PDA

View Full Version : PADI Divemaster Swim Test Times



Warby
07-30-2007, 23:38
Hi Everyone,

I'm currently studying for my PADI Divemaster and am trying to find out the times that the points are awarded for completing the 400yd, 800yd, 100yd tow and the 15 mins tread water. I realize that the points awarded are 1-5 but need to know the times associated with each discipline. I need to know how much pool work to put in!

Thanks in advance!

Warby

ScubaSteve
07-31-2007, 19:44
Unless they've changed...

You must score a combined 12 points or greater. So, in other words you can't get by with a 2 on every skill.

400 yd swim:
< 6 min. - 5 points
6 - 8 min - 4 points
8 - 10 min - 3 points
10 - 12 min - 2 points
>12 - 1 points

15 min tread (hands out last 2 min):
completed - 5 points
completed, but hands not out last 2 min - 3 points
used side/bottom momentarily no more than twice - 1 points

800 yd snorkel:
< 13 - 5 points
13 - 15 - 4 points
15 - 17 - 3 points
17 - 19 -2 points
>19 - 1 points

100 yd tow:
< 2 - 5
2 - 3 - 4 points
3 - 4 - 3 points
4 -5 - 2 points
> 5 - 1 points

ScubyDoo
07-31-2007, 20:35
ScubaSteve has posted the times required for each point level. The only things I would add from my experience would be...

1. Pace yourself on all long swims. If you go out too fast, you WILL run out of gas. I run marathons so I know a thing or two about endurance.

2. Don't swim on a full stomach. You will regret it. Eat a moderate meal about 2 hours before your swim. This allows enough time for the food to be broken down, processed, and exchanged to energy. If you feel you need some extra energy before your swim, eat a banana (potassium keeps cramps at bay). Staying hydrated will also keep away cramps. Drink gatorade that day with your meals. You can also eat some energy gels (Hammer Gel or Gu Gel are popular) about 30 minutes prior to your swim. It will take your body about 30 minutes to process and absorb them.

3. If you have split fins, make sure you use them for the 800 yd. snorkel swim. I wore my regular fins on my first attempt and was very unhappy with the results. On the make-up swim I wore the splits and increased my time by over 4 minutes.

4. On the 400 yd. free swim, plan to swim multiple forms. Different muscles will get tired requiring you to switch back and forth from freestyle, butterfly, backstroke, etc.

5. Encourage your fellow divemaster candidates as they are swimming. Cheer them on. Listen to their cheers as you swim. It could give you that extra determination to dig just a little deeper and gain a few extra seconds of time. It could be the difference between how many points you earn.

Warby
07-31-2007, 22:06
Thanks for your posts, there is some great advice there. I'm determined to score max points so I better step up my training!

CompuDude
08-03-2007, 13:45
ScubaSteve has posted the times required for each point level. The only things I would add from my experience would be...

1. Pace yourself on all long swims. If you go out too fast, you WILL run out of gas. I run marathons so I know a thing or two about endurance.

2. Don't swim on a full stomach. You will regret it. Eat a moderate meal about 2 hours before your swim. This allows enough time for the food to be broken down, processed, and exchanged to energy. If you feel you need some extra energy before your swim, eat a banana (potassium keeps cramps at bay). Staying hydrated will also keep away cramps. Drink gatorade that day with your meals. You can also eat some energy gels (Hammer Gel or Gu Gel are popular) about 30 minutes prior to your swim. It will take your body about 30 minutes to process and absorb them.

3. If you have split fins, make sure you use them for the 800 yd. snorkel swim. I wore my regular fins on my first attempt and was very unhappy with the results. On the make-up swim I wore the splits and increased my time by over 4 minutes.

4. On the 400 yd. free swim, plan to swim multiple forms. Different muscles will get tired requiring you to switch back and forth from freestyle, butterfly, backstroke, etc.

5. Encourage your fellow divemaster candidates as they are swimming. Cheer them on. Listen to their cheers as you swim. It could give you that extra determination to dig just a little deeper and gain a few extra seconds of time. It could be the difference between how many points you earn.
Excellent advice. I actually did all of those things to get through my tests. I found all of them quite easy except for the 400 yd swim, which was definitely the most challenging of the group.

ScubaSteve
08-03-2007, 22:55
ScubaSteve has posted the times required for each point level. The only things I would add from my experience would be...

1. Pace yourself on all long swims. If you go out too fast, you WILL run out of gas. I run marathons so I know a thing or two about endurance.

2. Don't swim on a full stomach. You will regret it. Eat a moderate meal about 2 hours before your swim. This allows enough time for the food to be broken down, processed, and exchanged to energy. If you feel you need some extra energy before your swim, eat a banana (potassium keeps cramps at bay). Staying hydrated will also keep away cramps. Drink gatorade that day with your meals. You can also eat some energy gels (Hammer Gel or Gu Gel are popular) about 30 minutes prior to your swim. It will take your body about 30 minutes to process and absorb them.

3. If you have split fins, make sure you use them for the 800 yd. snorkel swim. I wore my regular fins on my first attempt and was very unhappy with the results. On the make-up swim I wore the splits and increased my time by over 4 minutes.

4. On the 400 yd. free swim, plan to swim multiple forms. Different muscles will get tired requiring you to switch back and forth from freestyle, butterfly, backstroke, etc.

5. Encourage your fellow divemaster candidates as they are swimming. Cheer them on. Listen to their cheers as you swim. It could give you that extra determination to dig just a little deeper and gain a few extra seconds of time. It could be the difference between how many points you earn.
Excellent advice. I actually did all of those things to get through my tests. I found all of them quite easy except for the 400 yd swim, which was definitely the most challenging of the group.

Yep, I'd agree with that!

bubbles
08-05-2007, 16:56
I also found that I tend to overbreathe my snorkel on long swims...so i bought the Scubapro Shotgun 2 snorkel which has a "double barreled" area....you can't overbreathe it! Made a huge difference in my performance.

gtjason2000
08-17-2007, 08:56
I would recommend full footed fins for the 800yd. I was lucky that the local indoor pool we did the swims at had a bunch of full footed fins for the swim team. I had wanted to get a 5 on everything but the 800 was too slow with my regular fins but I was able to do it with the full footed.

ScaredSilly
08-17-2007, 12:39
I'm determined to score max points so I better step up my training!

I stroved for mediocracy ... went for 4s and enjoyed my self :D

CompuDude
08-17-2007, 13:35
I'm determined to score max points so I better step up my training!

I stroved for mediocracy ... went for 4s and enjoyed my self :D
I have no idea what my scores were... my instructor didn't actually tell us. I just know I passed and "did just fine", which is good enough for me. :)

namabiru
08-17-2007, 17:45
3. If you have split fins, make sure you use them for the 800 yd. snorkel swim. I wore my regular fins on my first attempt and was very unhappy with the results. On the make-up swim I wore the splits and increased my time by over 4 minutes.



So have people found it is better to wear splits or full-foot fins vs. a snorkeling fin or swimming fin (aka plastic vs. sturdier scuba fin)? I've not trained for the 800 yd snorkel before (I only started doing a bit for the 400), so haven't had a chance to try anything out.

I'm assuming that you not only had greater speed, but didn't see as much leg fatigue due to less movement required to get through the water. Does that sound right?

CompuDude
08-17-2007, 17:52
3. If you have split fins, make sure you use them for the 800 yd. snorkel swim. I wore my regular fins on my first attempt and was very unhappy with the results. On the make-up swim I wore the splits and increased my time by over 4 minutes.


So have people found it is better to wear splits or full-foot fins vs. a snorkeling fin or swimming fin (aka plastic vs. sturdier scuba fin)? I've not trained for the 800 yd snorkel before (I only started doing a bit for the 400), so haven't had a chance to try anything out.

I'm assuming that you not only had greater speed, but didn't see as much leg fatigue due to less movement required to get through the water. Does that sound right?
Whether splits are as good as paddles for general diving is a matter of much debate, but I was happy to have them for my 800 yd DM swim. The one thing they excel at is a speedy, low-effort kick... perfect for a pool swim where you are very unencumbered so drag is not an issue. They're not quite at full efficiency that close to the surface, but they still do their thing well. Since you aren't putting as much energy into the kicking, you can go long without getting too winded... and the 800 yd swim is all about a nice steady pace, not sprinting.

chinacat46
08-17-2007, 18:04
Just glad I don't have to do those swims again. To me they should adjust time for age but they don't. Lets face it a 20 year old kid in decent shape will run rings around 50 year old in decent shape but the times don't get adjusted for age. I got 4's on the 400 and 800 yard swims but when I was younger would have had no problem getting 5's. In fact if I had really really trained I probably could have gotten 5's but just didn't see the point.

When going to instructor you have to do the 800 yard swim again but it's untimed.

CompuDude
08-17-2007, 19:26
Just glad I don't have to do those swims again. To me they should adjust time for age but they don't. Lets face it a 20 year old kid in decent shape will run rings around 50 year old in decent shape but the times don't get adjusted for age. I got 4's on the 400 and 800 yard swims but when I was younger would have had no problem getting 5's. In fact if I had really really trained I probably could have gotten 5's but just didn't see the point.

When going to instructor you have to do the 800 yard swim again but it's untimed.
Yeah. I consider myself to be in not-especially-good shape (I'm not heavy, but I don't have any normal exercise regime). I was on the swim team for a time in high school, so I have some experience swimming that others don't. That said, I haven't done any real swimming (other than diving) in the past 20 years since then.

The fact that, at 30-something, I finished well ahead of the low-20-somethings in my DM class (and they were all reasonably fit, by comparison), definitely gave me pause.

IMO, if you have a real hard time passing (3's or better) these tests, you might not be cut out to be a dive professional who may need to take lead in a rescue.

JugglingMonkeys
08-18-2007, 09:21
avoid butterfly - the most rigorous of the strokes!

gtjason2000
08-20-2007, 12:46
The fastest fin would be what we called a zoomer which was a full footed fin cut down to about an inch past the toes. Scuba fins offer a lot of power but are far too long for the rapid kicks required to go fast. I also found trying to kick fast with a scuba fin put a lot of stress on my knees and ankles so I could not maintain a rapid kick for too long.

namabiru
08-20-2007, 13:21
Yeah. I consider myself to be in not-especially-good shape (I'm not heavy, but I don't have any normal exercise regime). I was on the swim team for a time in high school, so I have some experience swimming that others don't. That said, I haven't done any real swimming (other than diving) in the past 20 years since then.

IMO, if you have a real hard time passing (3's or better) these tests, you might not be cut out to be a dive professional who may need to take lead in a rescue.

Yeah, but then again, form is just as important as speed. So your being on the swim team helped you out quite a bit. Take someone like me, on the other hand, who has heart but no technique. I unofficially started training for the 400 as a fitness routine, and this was after no form training, and I was pleased the day I broke 11 minutes on a 440 (freestyle, no wall touches but swimming circles in the lane... okay, I may have touched the wall with my foot, but that's all). That would barely put me in the 3 range. Out of shape, maybe. Lack of form, definitely.

I read once where someone got back in the pool after a hiatus similar to yours, and was still able to eek out an 8 minute time or something because they remembered form.

Not trying to justify that I should be a dive professional due to this by any means, but it would definitely help one's cause to be able to do some swim training.

CompuDude
08-20-2007, 15:22
Yeah. I consider myself to be in not-especially-good shape (I'm not heavy, but I don't have any normal exercise regime). I was on the swim team for a time in high school, so I have some experience swimming that others don't. That said, I haven't done any real swimming (other than diving) in the past 20 years since then.

IMO, if you have a real hard time passing (3's or better) these tests, you might not be cut out to be a dive professional who may need to take lead in a rescue.

Yeah, but then again, form is just as important as speed. So your being on the swim team helped you out quite a bit. Take someone like me, on the other hand, who has heart but no technique. I unofficially started training for the 400 as a fitness routine, and this was after no form training, and I was pleased the day I broke 11 minutes on a 440 (freestyle, no wall touches but swimming circles in the lane... okay, I may have touched the wall with my foot, but that's all). That would barely put me in the 3 range. Out of shape, maybe. Lack of form, definitely.

I read once where someone got back in the pool after a hiatus similar to yours, and was still able to eek out an 8 minute time or something because they remembered form.

Not trying to justify that I should be a dive professional due to this by any means, but it would definitely help one's cause to be able to do some swim training.
I agree, form helps.

I posted just this morning in another thread about this: If you are comfortable swimming , and consider yourself a decent swimmer, cardio and being in shape are going to be more important than swim practice. The exercise bike will help you as much as swimming laps. You may or may not score a 5 but you'll pass just fine. OTOH, if you're not an especially strong swimming, cardio or not you're going to want to log some serious swim practice and perhaps get some lessons (which will also help take care of the cardio, needed or not).

cgvmer
08-20-2007, 16:11
Anyone planning to be a dive pro, should consider these distances and times as being just below adequate.

EMTGIRL86
03-16-2008, 19:24
I have already done my Mask, fin, snorkel swim for my DM. I did it with my aqualung blades (the original) and passes the 800m swim in 7:59. I am not in the best of shape by any means, though I have reasonably strong legs. So, moral of the story, it can be done with regular scuba fins. Dont forget to have fun with this either! :smiley2:

DivingCRNA
03-16-2008, 19:53
Anyone planning to be a dive pro, should consider these distances and times as being just below adequate.

Because a diver spends so much time swimming....

When is the last time a DIVER had to swim FAR and FAST?

:smilie39::laugh::scratchchin:

Anyone who thinks good swimming is needed for rescue needs to rethink their primary rescue plans, BTW...

As for split fins... They suck for the 800 yd snorkel. I used my POS Oceanic V12 vortexes (floppy and heavy as heck) and scored 2 points. I run and am in decent shape.

I got some Aqualung Blade 2s (long, light and stiff) before doing the inert diver tow and just missed 4 points. I am gonna redo the snorkel in these because splits blow on the surface.

cummings66
03-17-2008, 07:26
A DM I know had to swim to rescue a swimmer who was drowning. He had just showed up at the dive spot and noticed a person drowning, too far to toss a flotation aid to so he swam it out to them.

It might come in handy in ways you don't know.

DivingCRNA
03-17-2008, 08:24
A DM I know had to swim to rescue a swimmer who was drowning. He had just showed up at the dive spot and noticed a person drowning, too far to toss a flotation aid to so he swam it out to them.

It might come in handy in ways you don't know.

I knew there would be a few "I knew this one guy" stories. But how often does a DM really need FAST swimming skills? Does it count if you train your butt off for the test, and then stop when you pass?

OTGav
03-18-2008, 07:14
Last trip I was on I ended up doing 2 tired diver tows on the same dive, got one close enough to the boat and then went back for the other one - endurance was important then. Bit of current to fight, probably 80m from boat, so that's about 150m against current and 80 with - sure felt like 400m+ by the end.

I've also had an anchor get stuck, and the prop pick up the anchor line. A high speed swim would have been important under those circumstances if someone had got in trouble - the boat isn't going to be able to move for 10-15 minutes.

How is it bad to be fast and have good endurance in the water?

Sure helps you zip about from student to student in herding mode when they do a "gang of cats + firework" impression when they first get in the water. And no, slacking off completely after the test doesn't help - same as the learning side, you don't stop learning new stuff just becuase you passed the exam.

tclark
11-24-2008, 11:51
I've got my rescue diver and am going to work on my dive master. These swim tests seem to be the biggest part of it all.
I'm going to get a membership at the local club with an indoor lap pool, since its now winter, and work on my skills.
T.

teerlkay
11-24-2008, 15:18
.


3. If you have split fins, make sure you use them for the 800 yd. snorkel swim. I wore my regular fins on my first attempt and was very unhappy with the results. On the make-up swim I wore the splits and increased my time by over 4 minutes.




I assume the poster meant "decreased my time" ?????

cummings66
11-25-2008, 16:34
That's a good catch, I'd hate to go for my DM swim test and try to increase my times.

cjwaid
12-30-2008, 17:04
If you can swim, no worries.

I am solid muscle, so I have a tendency to sink like a brick. I consider myself to be a sh-ty swimmer at best. It's not that hard.

Get your breathing down, I take a break every 2 stroke cycles, or on my 4th stroke. (left, right, left, right, Breathe on my left)

As far as floating, treading, I have to keep my lungs filled or I sink like a brick.

If your not a strong swimmer, you'll need to spend time working at it. Unfortunately, swimming is one of, if not THE hardest sport for your body to adapt to. So it takes a lot of practice if your not a natural. Swimmers generally practice several hours a day, sometimes twice a day.

Your body has a lot to get use to when you are challenging it from that many different angles (pulling body through water), so spend time on it.

Lulubelle
12-30-2008, 19:06
If you can swim, no worries.

I am solid muscle, so I have a tendency to sink like a brick. I consider myself to be a sh-ty swimmer at best. It's not that hard.

Get your breathing down, I take a break every 2 stroke cycles, or on my 4th stroke. (left, right, left, right, Breathe on my left)

As far as floating, treading, I have to keep my lungs filled or I sink like a brick.

If your not a strong swimmer, you'll need to spend time working at it. Unfortunately, swimming is one of, if not THE hardest sport for your body to adapt to. So it takes a lot of practice if your not a natural. Swimmers generally practice several hours a day, sometimes twice a day.

Your body has a lot to get use to when you are challenging it from that many different angles (pulling body through water), so spend time on it.

Find yourself a master's swimmer at a swim club to give you some stroke advice and you may amaze yourself at how fast you can go. It is as much about finesse as power. Certainly helps if you are tall and skinny. Brother was a freestyle sprinter at the Olympic level and he loves advising other athletes on their stroke. Hey, and you get to use FINS.

DMWiz
12-30-2008, 21:02
Just out of curiosity... How many of you did your swim tests in a pool and who did it in the ocean or other natural body of water?

I'm a sinker and poor swimmer, but have good endurance so I elected to test in the ocean 'cause I would have failed every single one of those in a pool. It worked!

Skred
12-30-2008, 21:26
Just out of curiosity... How many of you did your swim tests in a pool and who did it in the ocean or other natural body of water?

I'm a sinker and poor swimmer, but have good endurance so I elected to test in the ocean 'cause I would have failed every single one of those in a pool. It worked!

I was not given a choice...did them in a pool.

I was never a really proficient swimmer so I booked a couple of sessions with an instructor at the local Y to learn stroke technique. After that, I practiced my tail off at my gym and at the neighborhood pool all summer.

DMWiz, did you do all 4 in the same day?

DMWiz
12-30-2008, 22:30
Nope, I did treading and 800 yd. in lovely washing machine-like conditions on a Saturday. Then 400 yd the following week. I did a bunch of tows during my training specially during shore entries just for kicks and giggles that was the easiest part for me.

scubasamurai
01-03-2009, 01:05
did all the swims in the pool and all on the same day. most of the swims i did in rescue in the open water as well. my advice is just practice swimming. if your not in too good of shape stick to the breast stroke. most important take your time and focus on your swimming, not on what the other person is doing of your time, you will be surprised how fast you really can go good luck

cjwaid
10-19-2009, 10:40
A DM I know had to swim to rescue a swimmer who was drowning. He had just showed up at the dive spot and noticed a person drowning, too far to toss a flotation aid to so he swam it out to them.

It might come in handy in ways you don't know.

I knew there would be a few "I knew this one guy" stories. But how often does a DM really need FAST swimming skills? Does it count if you train your butt off for the test, and then stop when you pass?

WELL... I KNEW THIS ONE GIRL... My girlfriend is a certified rescue diver, and she is also a heck of a swimmer (volusia county lifeguard, big waves, heavy surf, lot's of non-swimmers wondering into the rips)... For her part, When I put on her rescue class (yeah, I was her instructor), I did so in overhead waves, she was the strongest swimmer out of all of us, which shined through when she was the only person that could handle controlling the victim, and delivering accurate and deliberate rescue breaths while removing equipment in those conditions (yeah, I made her do what is to be done in only calm waters while dealing with 6-8' waves and heavy current... Her swimming ability is what gave her the upper hand, no doubt about it, those legs never quit kicking to control the rescue.

Another thing is that a well trained DIVER should be completely comfortable in the water, it's what separates a divemaster from an open water diver, the divemaster must be someone that people can look to when things get tough.

As far as the swimming ability goes, why wouldn't a divemaster want to be a good swimmer??? if they don't want to work hard at becoming a swimmer what makes you think they will work hard at anything else that is challenging???

Tom H
10-27-2009, 20:25
There has been some talk about swimming vs. diving, etc. Swimming involves strength (particularly arms), good cardio, stamina, etc.--but most important is form. I don't think it is really a true test for divers. About the 3rd thing you learn in Rescue is keep mask, fins, snorkel ready at all times. When would you ever be without those--even if they were still in the car when you arrived to see someone in need of rescue. Where does swimming without these tools come in here? I agree that all LDS's should allow the tests to be done in salt water as well--I, too am a sinker. Still can't figure out how to keep my hands out the last 2 minutes on the float. But I WILL....Then when my boat sinks in the middle of the Pacific and it's just me floating with no aid, after 3 hours I can stick my hands out of the water for 2 minutes just to make it a bigger challenge! So--elliminate the 400 swim and the hands out thing. But make HARDER (longer) the 800, the tired diver tow and the floating (yes, I figured out how to do this in the pool, but it's way harder for me than just lying on my back with no movement at all in the ocean). These are things that a divemaster will at some point have to do to rescue someone....Although since the diver is only tired, not panicked, the need for speed is questionable. And I know it's possible, but try to think of a scenario where you are in bathing suit only and must float--and in fresh water to boot....

CompuDude
10-27-2009, 20:44
There has been some talk about swimming vs. diving, etc. Swimming involves strength (particularly arms), good cardio, stamina, etc.--but most important is form. I don't think it is really a true test for divers. About the 3rd thing you learn in Rescue is keep mask, fins, snorkel ready at all times. When would you ever be without those--even if they were still in the car when you arrived to see someone in need of rescue. Where does swimming without these tools come in here? I agree that all LDS's should allow the tests to be done in salt water as well--I, too am a sinker. Still can't figure out how to keep my hands out the last 2 minutes on the float. But I WILL....Then when my boat sinks in the middle of the Pacific and it's just me floating with no aid, after 3 hours I can stick my hands out of the water for 2 minutes just to make it a bigger challenge! So--elliminate the 400 swim and the hands out thing. But make HARDER (longer) the 800, the tired diver tow and the floating (yes, I figured out how to do this in the pool, but it's way harder for me than just lying on my back with no movement at all in the ocean). These are things that a divemaster will at some point have to do to rescue someone....Although since the diver is only tired, not panicked, the need for speed is questionable. And I know it's possible, but try to think of a scenario where you are in bathing suit only and must float--and in fresh water to boot....

I'm afraid I have to disagree with nearly everything you said.

But I'll leave it at that.

mitsuguy
10-28-2009, 08:59
Lets play out a scenario that happened here recently. An instructor was out with two discover scuba diving participants. One was having ear issues, so, they were on the surface discussing it, approximately 200 feet from shore. A call for help is heard farther out from their location. The instructor has the DSDers inflate their BC's all the way and swim towards shore, as she swam full speed towards the person in trouble... He was actively having a heart attack (though he was just snorkeling, not diving) She towed him all the way back to shore, where help was waiting...

I'd like the process in rethinking those rescue plans? The only alternative would have been to spend 10 minutes putting one of our boats in the water...

Also, about the option of doing it in salt water versus freshwater... You should be able to do the tests in the scenario you intend on working in. Salt water makes us naturally more buoyant. I did all of mine in a pool, because at the time, I would be assisting with courses in freshwater. If you can do them in freshwater, however, saltwater is even easier...





Anyone planning to be a dive pro, should consider these distances and times as being just below adequate.

Because a diver spends so much time swimming....

When is the last time a DIVER had to swim FAR and FAST?

:smilie39::laugh::scratchchin:

Anyone who thinks good swimming is needed for rescue needs to rethink their primary rescue plans, BTW...

As for split fins... They suck for the 800 yd snorkel. I used my POS Oceanic V12 vortexes (floppy and heavy as heck) and scored 2 points. I run and am in decent shape.

I got some Aqualung Blade 2s (long, light and stiff) before doing the inert diver tow and just missed 4 points. I am gonna redo the snorkel in these because splits blow on the surface.

Tom H
10-28-2009, 13:28
mitsuguy, I can't think of any better way to do that rescue. It sort of makes my point, that though obviously strength and stamina are very important, the Instructor did the recsue in full scuba gear, not swimming in her bathing suit. Towing him back without fins 200 yards would have been interesting.

Jack911
06-10-2010, 05:34
400 yd swim:
800 yd snorkel:
100 yd tow:


Does anyone know what the distances are in the UK?

I assume they're in metric, although the UK seems to have a lot of trouble deciding whether it's metric or imperial.

Also, for the diver tow, can you use fins?

DMWiz
06-10-2010, 05:42
The instructor manual says, "meters/yards" so you could do either no matter where in the world you are.

400 meters/yards non-stop w/o swimming aids using any stroke
800 meters/yards non-stop using mask snorkel and fins no flotation devices or hands
100 meters/yards tow non-stop in full scuba gear

mitsuguy
06-10-2010, 06:08
you do get a little more time if you do it in meters though...

Bill A
06-17-2010, 21:57
I did all my swim tests after basic open water in the ocean, and for the rescue class I took the instructor looked at the surf/ weather report and we went to the beach having the biggest surf for our tests, twas a bitch. He also taught my DM class
Bill

BuzzGA
06-19-2010, 00:00
I have to agree with the encouragement of the others. A couple of the folks in my class were gassed before the end of the swims and they said when they heard a bunch of us yelling for them it got them through. And remember you don't have to set a speed record so relax and get through it...steady all the way

rawalker
06-19-2010, 01:44
Just glad I don't have to do those swims again. To me they should adjust time for age but they don't. Lets face it a 20 year old kid in decent shape will run rings around 50 year old in decent shape but the times don't get adjusted for age. I got 4's on the 400 and 800 yard swims but when I was younger would have had no problem getting 5's. In fact if I had really really trained I probably could have gotten 5's but just didn't see the point.

When going to instructor you have to do the 800 yard swim again but it's untimed.
Yeah. I consider myself to be in not-especially-good shape (I'm not heavy, but I don't have any normal exercise regime). I was on the swim team for a time in high school, so I have some experience swimming that others don't. That said, I haven't done any real swimming (other than diving) in the past 20 years since then.

The fact that, at 30-something, I finished well ahead of the low-20-somethings in my DM class (and they were all reasonably fit, by comparison), definitely gave me pause.

IMO, if you have a real hard time passing (3's or better) these tests, you might not be cut out to be a dive professional who may need to take lead in a rescue.

Just consider what they call a Doctor that finished last in his class....................DOCTOR.
We all have our strengths and weaknesses and that is why you need to finish each of the tests and have a total of 12 or more points.
I scored 5s on Float/tread and tired diver tow I only needed to finish the swim and snorkel I did a 2 on the swim and a 3 on the snorkel guess what?
I can probably get a 4 on each if I did them again today but hey I'm already a divemaster and I'll go through IDC in a few more months.
As a dive leader you'll have fins to use anyway the swim is just a general condition test and as I started my remarks with we all have our strengths and weaknesses.