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mm2002
03-19-2008, 13:37
First of all, please don't turn this thread into something racist, as it's not meant to be. I see all people equal regardless of race, color, religion, etc.

What has puzzled me though, is that I never see any black folks diving. What's up with that? Any black members here?

Lake Diver
03-19-2008, 13:39
Black Angels Dive Club (http://www.blackangelsdiveclub.com/index.htm)

There's a club

cudachaser
03-19-2008, 13:52
And we cannot overlook these folks...

NABS (http://www.nabsdivers.org/)

caroln
03-19-2008, 13:53
One of the things I noticed at Beneath the Sea last year (a diving show) was how diverse the crowd was--old, young, fat, skinny, men, women, all different races, etc. This is a pretty diverse area in general though, so that wasn't too unusual. I would guess that the diving population in any given area would tend to be a mini representation of the population of the area in general

ChrisA
03-19-2008, 13:59
What has puzzled me though, is that I never see any black folks diving. What's up with that? Any black members here?

It's rare. I've only met a few, only three that I could name and that I see semi-regularly. But there are other under represented groups as well, like women.

ChrisA
03-19-2008, 14:04
... I would guess that the diving population in any given area would tend to be a mini representation of the population of the area

Yes you'd expect that. But we notice it is NOT that way. So we are asking "Why not?". It it were true then half of all the divers wuld be female. Many groups are under-represented.

Osprey
03-19-2008, 14:15
I've seen a handful of black members here on this board, but I also imagine it depends where you are in the world. No doubt there are populations where white or Latino divers aren't so common :)

DollFin
03-19-2008, 14:20
A friend of mine works in a motel right by Devil's Den in FL and she says one of the black dive clubs (I think it was the Angels but I'd have to ask her) was just there. My friends in St. T have had at least 2 black DM's working there.

Garrobo
03-19-2008, 14:21
DId you ever think that maybe many blacks and women just aren't interested in diving? It's primarily a guy thing in my opinion. I've dived with quite few women though. In almost 100 dives I have only run across one brown-skinned diver and he was originally from India. At the YMCA pool where I go to do laps women and men are about equal during the daytime hours. All the lifeguards are women though. ( Suits me. )

caroln
03-19-2008, 14:30
Yes you'd expect that. But we notice it is NOT that way. So we are asking "Why not?". It it were true then half of all the divers wuld be female. Many groups are under-represented.


Good point.

mm2002
03-19-2008, 16:37
I could definitely see that in an area where more diversity in race, etc., was prevalent, you'd surely see a more diverse group in any one sport, hobby, etc. I am looking at the big picture, and out of the many many scuba related pictures, articles, etc. that I've read, it seems that I see mostly white and asian people diving. I haven't even noticed the male vs. female aspect of it, as it seems to be pretty much 50/50 in my eyes. (Lots of female divers!) All in all, though, until one of the above posts I'd never even seen a black person wearing scuba gear!

Gombessa
03-19-2008, 16:48
I think it's because they're all diving on the PADI front page :)

mm2002
03-19-2008, 17:03
I think it's because they're all diving on the PADI front page :)

Ha! I never noticed that! Those can't be real divers though, probably just advertising models. :smiley36:

Garrobo
03-19-2008, 18:45
Wonder if black people wear white wetsuits?

FishFood
03-19-2008, 19:01
Wonder if black people wear white wetsuits?

:smilie39:

.... or bungee their second stage on a gold, "bling bling" chain :smiley20:

In all seriousness, a large majority of blacks I know are afraid of the water for some reason. Don't want to swim, much less dive...

cummings66
03-19-2008, 20:42
I have seen black divers during Project Aware at Branson, but outside of that I don't see them. As to women, I see a few but not many. It's mostly guys, and mostly younger guys from what I can see.

I know based on the members here that many of us have a few years on us, but you'd not see that in my area for the most part.

texdiveguy
03-19-2008, 20:50
In the DFW, Tx. area there is an active group/club of black divers.

Splitlip
03-19-2008, 20:51
.....

terrillja
03-19-2008, 20:53
Andre, he owns the St. Thomas Diving Club. Great shop to dive with.

Splitlip
03-19-2008, 21:03
I just read through this entire thread. Mods, get rid of it.

texdiveguy
03-19-2008, 21:11
I just read through this entire thread. Mods, get rid of it.

There is a little Report Thread buttom you can push. I don't see anyone stepping out of bounds..?

Splitlip
03-19-2008, 21:20
Bling bling? Afraid of the water?
deleted I am not going to make this an episode of Seinfeld.
If I have to explain, you would not understand.
Thanks.

texdiveguy
03-19-2008, 21:25
Black Coral Sea Divers of Dallas
Scuba Gear and Scuba Diving Equipment - Discount dive gear (Cheap online!) (http://www.nubiandiveclub.org/index.html) (Houston, Tx.)

FishFood
03-19-2008, 21:29
Bling bling? Afraid of the water?
deleted I am not going to make this an episode of Seinfeld.
If I have to explain, you would not understand.
Thanks.

Bling bling...? A little humor. Afraid of the water? A fact that seems to be obvious around my neck of the woods. Nothing "racist" about my statements... Someone asks why one group seems to be more active than another, and fear of the water would be a big reason.

EDIT:

Split, you seem like a good person. If you think my humor crossed the line, then I do apologize. Even though Im sure if the joke were turned around it be okay, I don't want to offend anyone.

As for the water phobia, again, there was no humor there. It's a theme Ive noticed as long as I can remember.

mm2002
03-19-2008, 22:14
Bling bling? Afraid of the water?
deleted I am not going to make this an episode of Seinfeld.
If I have to explain, you would not understand.
Thanks.

Well, I see you're from Jupiter. At least now I know that Jupiterians dive. I never knew that! :smiley36:

torrey
03-20-2008, 08:23
Personally, I don't think you should race while diving. It uses up too much air.

TX1Chica
03-20-2008, 08:44
As a woman, one thing I have noticed is that a lot of guys want to make a compitition out of things and push the limits a lot faster. I love to dive. But while On vacation with my family (brothers and sisters) I don't dive every day. I like to go see the sites with my husband (non-diver) too. And I will get comments like your not a "real" diver. Or if I don't feel that I am ready for Devils Throat in Coz that makes me less of a diver. I don't want to compete. I just want to see what it looks like underwater and relax and continue to improve my skills. I have been the only woman on a boat before. Its kinda uncomfortable. I'm a pretty conservative kinda gal and these guys from up north kept making a lot of jokes with the bannanas that were provided. I just ignored them.

Osprey
03-20-2008, 10:31
I have to say that currently, most of the folks signing up for classes around here are female

And I agree with TX1, it seems many people think that they have to be a macho superstar to dive. That's a danger not only to themselves, but the people who have to go drag them back to the surface when they do something stupid.

cmburch
03-20-2008, 12:00
I thought this thread was about racing. I love going fast and sucking up air for the pure pleasure of it. My gear is configured for speed and max bottom time - I know it may not make sense. My wife actually got me re-interested in diving. She and her friends are into discovering and enjoying nature. I am into killing and eating it. They like eating it too. She use to get perturbed at me for sucking up all my air and having to surface thus cutting everyone else's enjoyable dive short. About 10 years ago I got a steel HP100 and solved the problem. My wife would tell the guys what to do with their bananas - she is verbal with a short fuse. My buddy from Jr HS is black and SCUBA dives. Also one of my neighbors is black and free dives.

mitsuguy
03-20-2008, 12:09
it's going to vary depending on where you are... and also, the people you dive with will tend to be people like you... kinda like you subconsciously pick friends who are like you in one way or another...

that being said, I have a good number of black friends, and grew up with a lot... they do not like water as a general rule, and the ones that don't like the water are not afraid or embarrassed by it at all, at least the guys I know... the same group of guys, when going tubing on the river, wear life preservers, when it's 3-8 feet deep the whole way and they are sitting on tubes...

but then again, they grew up in the midwest where you have to really make an effort to get in the water...

Garrobo
03-20-2008, 16:16
To the few here who don't like to read a discussion like this involving comments about differences in the races, that's part of the problem. Everyone is afraid to talk about it. The other thing about some juvenile di**weeds bothering a female on the boat with inuendos about a banana, the captain should step in and tell them to knock it off or they are going back to the dock (or just throw them overboard).

mm2002
03-20-2008, 18:37
it's going to vary depending on where you are... and also, the people you dive with will tend to be people like you... kinda like you subconsciously pick friends who are like you in one way or another...

that being said, I have a good number of black friends, and grew up with a lot... they do not like water as a general rule, and the ones that don't like the water are not afraid or embarrassed by it at all, at least the guys I know... the same group of guys, when going tubing on the river, wear life preservers, when it's 3-8 feet deep the whole way and they are sitting on tubes...

but then again, they grew up in the midwest where you have to really make an effort to get in the water...

Yep, and I've seen it all my life. For some reason a good majority of black people just hate the water. I think that it's got to be something instilled in the genes of that certain race. It's not a bad thing, just interesting.
I will promise you one thing; there are a lot of black guys who play some serious basketball at the Y I go to, and there ain't no way this cracker is stepping on the court to compete with any of them! :smiley36:

And hey, about the "racism" thing. Ya know folks, we're all the same inside. I'm not afraid to talk about it, but then again, I grew up in very mixed company. In my crowd, you couldn't even imagine everyone being one color, religion, etc. We were all who we were, and that's the deal. Anyone uncomfortable with that needs to take a good long look at life in general.

mm2002
03-20-2008, 19:02
Oh, and here's a pic of my best friend and I last summer (I call him "Beaner")
Funny, we're different colors, different country's of origin, different religions, etc., but somehow we're true brothers.
How's that for racist! :smiley36:

http://www.mm-restoration.com/scuba/mebeaner.jpg

mark44883
03-20-2008, 19:58
As a woman, one thing I have noticed is that a lot of guys want to make a compitition out of things and push the limits a lot faster. I love to dive. But while On vacation with my family (brothers and sisters) I don't dive every day. I like to go see the sites with my husband (non-diver) too. And I will get comments like your not a "real" diver. Or if I don't feel that I am ready for Devils Throat in Coz that makes me less of a diver. I don't want to compete. I just want to see what it looks like underwater and relax and continue to improve my skills. I have been the only woman on a boat before. Its kinda uncomfortable. I'm a pretty conservative kinda gal and these guys from up north kept making a lot of jokes with the bannanas that were provided. I just ignored them.
my heart is broken I can not come here any more she is married lol:smiley19::smiley19::smiley19::smiley19::smilie 39::smilie39::smilie40:

mark44883
03-20-2008, 19:59
all right witch one are you in the pic lol

mark44883
03-20-2008, 20:00
Oh, and here's a pic of my best friend and I last summer (I call him "Beaner")
Funny, we're different colors, different country's of origin, different religions, etc., but somehow we're true brothers.
How's that for racist! :smiley36:

http://www.mm-restoration.com/scuba/mebeaner.jpg
witch one are you in the pic lol

Garrobo
03-20-2008, 20:12
Marc44883::: You beat me to it.

cummings66
03-20-2008, 20:43
Here's an interesting profile I know of. Check it out, plus the other hobbies he has.

http://www.usaswimming.org/USASWeb/ViewMiscArticle.aspx?TabId=515&Alias=Rainbow&Lang=en&mid=850&ItemId=1146

To turn it around, I'm not where they are either. What's up with that?

The thing about it is this, it's not bad to wonder about the other side. Curiosity is a natural part of life, we're all that way. To forbid questions of what the other half is doing is simply not right. It's not racist to wonder why one race is so good at something and another isn't. There are studies which have proven that each race has something it excels at compared to the others. It's not racist to point out the truth or to even question it.

It's racist to say that white people are superior to all others, more so if you really believe that. Would it be racist to say women excel at having babies? No, it's a fact.

I don't believe anybody here is acting like a racist, merely stating what they have observed and wondering why.

mm2002
03-21-2008, 09:35
witch one are you in the pic lol

I'm the good looking one.

Garrobo
03-21-2008, 10:37
You're also blind.

hoobascooba
03-21-2008, 10:50
i dive with a black guy.

he's also a cop/detective in my town. not that that has anything to do with the subject at hand, but he's a great diver.

mm2002
03-21-2008, 16:28
You're also blind.

:smilie39:

MSilvia
03-21-2008, 16:55
he's also a cop/detective in my town. not that that has anything to do with the subject at hand, but he's a great diver.
Maybe it does have something to do with it... he's in a line of work that makes it possible for him to afford diving as a hobby. It's an unfortunate fact that demographicly speaking, all races aren't on equal economic footing. There are a lot more Asians and Caucasians able to pay the high financial cost of being a diver, and I'd guess that's a big factor in why there seem to be a lot more Caucasian and Asian divers.

I'm a bit suprised it hasn't been mentioned yet.

hoobascooba
03-21-2008, 17:08
well i really don't know what his salary is, but it's safe to say that I make a heck alot more money than he does.

maybe he's training to be a PSD?

also noteworthy of mentioning... i know another black guy that I work with, that makes more money than I do, but he can't afford to move out of his mother's house...??? he's 35 yrs old.... never been married, leaves old food laying on his office floor under his desk, walks the halls like he's got nothing to do, etc...

just something to think about.

snarkyone
03-21-2008, 17:09
I have to say I think diving tends to draw people not only who are comfortable in water, etc but people of a certain socio-economic background. My (very white) SIL could never afford to dive, even if she wanted to. She made choices and is living with them, but wouldn't have the money to go through O/W let alone a trip. Out here in AZ at least, salary and profession have a lot to do with diving. Not only do you need the money, but to some extent you need the flexible vacation time and schedule for trips. In my experience, I've met quite a few female divers and quite a few hispanic divers here in Phoenix.

mm2002
03-21-2008, 17:33
i dive with a black guy.


Ok, pic please?

You could call your dive club Salt-n-Pepper.

We're going to call ours Beans-n-Crackers. (that is IF I ever talk beaner into diving)

We're gonna blow this "racist" crap clean out of the water. (pun intended)

hoobascooba
03-21-2008, 17:53
i dive with a black guy.


Ok, pic please?

You could call your dive club Salt-n-Pepper.

We're going to call ours Beans-n-Crackers. (that is IF I ever talk beaner into diving)

We're gonna blow this "racist" crap clean out of the water. (pun intended)

well maybe i should have typed DIVED with a black guy only twice.

didn't take pics.

but i'd definitely dive with him again... but never will i dive with the black guy that i work with!

Garrobo
03-21-2008, 21:07
I don't know about the idea that people other than whites on average don't dive because they don't make enough money. I worked over 40 years in the electrical construction trade as a union journeyman electrician along side of many blacks, a few Mexicans and one or two Vietnamese, all of who made top wages, and none of them that I can remember was a diver. And diving was pretty often a topic of conversation around coffee break table since a lot of the white guys in the trade did dive simply because they could afford it. The only thing that I remember was a couple of them saying that they had done a vacation dive or two and some snorkeling.

scuba Widow
03-22-2008, 00:20
Has anybody stop to consider that maybe it has nothing to do with the color of your skin or the amount of money that you make that makes you want to dive or not? There are alot of reasons why someone chooses not to dive. I know within my own household my husband dives, but I do not simply because I don't want to. It has nothing to do with what I make or that I'm a white female. My husband would love nothing better than for me to learn to dive, but I have no understanding of the concept of the enjoyment of doing all the hard work it takes to get ready for a dive, do the dive and then have to unpack after the dive...all with possibility of something going wrong I me dying for all my trouble, but if that is what you want to do then that is up to you.

I have read this thread and the things I have read from both sides is not the Scuba Toys forum members that I have grown to love. I hear people knocking each race and making comments that aren't exactly politically correct and feelings getting hurt because of it and that isn't right. I also hear comments about the amount of money in someone wallet and place that they live having something to do with it....well, that to is wrong to say...Keep in mind that the only one holding someone back is themselves. You can live in the poorest section of a city and still be the richest person in the world.

With that being said I am not a racist...but I will say this there would alot less conflict in this world if everyone would stop wearing their hearts on their sleeves and let everyone have equal pride in their heritage. It doesn't matter what color you skin is, if you get cut you still bleed red.

Sorry to high jack the thread but come on guys...get back to being the Scuba Toys forum members that makes divers and non divers alike proud to be associated with.

DollFin
03-22-2008, 01:29
You're also blind.

Huh?? Oh, sorry, thought you were talking about me! :smilie39:

Judge
03-22-2008, 02:54
The majority of the guys in my motorcycle club that are black do NOT want anything to do with watersports. Boats, diving, swimming etc....they just don't like it.

DRNightdiver
03-22-2008, 06:59
We will never get past this racism crap until society gets over the ultra sensitivity about even asking a question about another race. News flash!...We are all different. That's what makes life fun. I'm a curious person by nature. I want to know how things work, why things are the way they are. Maybe that's why I was drawn to scuba diving. As you all know, the underwater world is fascinating. If I'm going to be branded a racist everytime I ask a question about something that I don't understand them I'm going to stop asking the question. That's only going to make me more curious. I believe that fear of the unknown and ingnorance is the bases for racisism. Scuba divers by nature are curious. We are also very accepting of those that are different. If you love diving, no matter what other differences we have, we will always having something to talk about.

mm2002
03-22-2008, 08:41
We will never get passed this racism crap until society gets over the ultra sensitivity about even asking a question about another race. News flash!...We are all different. That's what makes life fun. I'm a curious person by nature. I want to know how things work, why things are the way they are. Maybe that's why I was drawn to scuba diving. As you all know, the underwater world is fascinating. If I'm going to be branded a racist everytime I ask a question about something that I don't understand them I'm going to stop asking the question. That's only going to make me more curious. I believe that fear of the unknown and ingnorance is the bases for racisism. Scuba divers by nature are curious. We are also very accepting of those that are different. If you love diving, no matter what other differences we have, we will always having something to talk about.


I couldn't have said it better! :smiley32:

Crimediver
03-22-2008, 08:47
I have a partner on my PSD team who is black. I gave him a nick name "Cookie" after the one used by Master Diver Carl Brashear (Men of Honor). He liked the nick name but it worried him a little when I told him I would need to amputate his leg for him to be called that.

obrules15
03-22-2008, 09:08
I am black and I am a Diver, actually a divemaster, and I am on this forum

1. This thread is fine if you ask me, it is just asking questions.

2. The first issue is that many/most blacks don't swim and traditionally we don't learn to swim because our mothers don't swim mostly because of the amount of work involved in doing our hair. While it doesn't seem like a big deal trust me if everytime it got wet it required 3 hours in the bathroom or a $100 outlay to the beauty shop you wouldn't want to get it wet either.

3. You don't see a lot of black divers separately because we tend to clump in groups. I prefer to go on dive trips where I know I am welcome and tend to go back to the same hotel in Cozumel because I know exactly how I will be treated. I shop at Scubatoys (used to be 2Dive4) because I know how I will be treated. There is also an LDS owned by a black woman on the east coast that many of us use. If you talk to a alot of the members of the National Association of Black Scuba Divers which has a chapter in almost every major city most have been treated ****ty at one point or another so we tend to group. But Dr. Jose Jones has been recognized nationally as have many other members of that group. Just because you don't see us doesn't mean we aren't there. And trust me, dive gear is an equal opportunity money sucker :).

mm2002
03-22-2008, 09:32
I am black and I am a Diver, actually a divemaster, and I am on this forum

1. This thread is fine if you ask me, it is just asking questions.

2. The first issue is that many/most blacks don't swim and traditionally we don't learn to swim because our mothers don't swim mostly because of the amount of work involved in doing our hair. While it doesn't seem like a big deal trust me if everytime it got wet it required 3 hours in the bathroom or a $100 outlay to the beauty shop you wouldn't want to get it wet either.

3. You don't see a lot of black divers separately because we tend to clump in groups. I prefer to go on dive trips where I know I am welcome and tend to go back to the same hotel in Cozumel because I know exactly how I will be treated. I shop at Scubatoys (used to be 2Dive4) because I know how I will be treated. There is also an LDS owned by a black woman on the east coast that many of us use. If you talk to a alot of the members of the National Association of Black Scuba Divers which has a chapter in almost every major city most have been treated ****ty at one point or another so we tend to group. But Dr. Jose Jones has been recognized nationally as have many other members of that group. Just because you don't see us doesn't mean we aren't there. And trust me, dive gear is an equal opportunity money sucker :).


See, people were blaming economics, culture, etc., and all the time it's the hair! :smiley36: Whooda thunk it??

I've never heard of the National Association of Black Scuba Divers, and I think it's total crap that they should be treated any differently than other dive clubs. Oh well, it is what it is.......even though it sucks a lot of the time. Some day people are going to wake up and realize that we must all stick together, or this world is going to be a terrible place to be in the future.

hoobascooba
03-22-2008, 10:00
Has anybody stop to consider that maybe it has nothing to do with the color of your skin or the amount of money that you make that makes you want to dive or not?

yes I believe it has been considered. especially the money part.

I got certified in 2002, 5 total dives until 2007. The large gap in between was due to "amount of money" I made. Most everybody else I talk to, can't dive also because of this costly sport.

Next year my daughter is not gonna be able to be in dance company because of the outrageous costs.

hoobascooba
03-22-2008, 10:03
I am black and I am a Diver, actually a divemaster, and I am on this forum

1. This thread is fine if you ask me, it is just asking questions.

2. The first issue is that many/most blacks don't swim and traditionally we don't learn to swim because our mothers don't swim mostly because of the amount of work involved in doing our hair. While it doesn't seem like a big deal trust me if everytime it got wet it required 3 hours in the bathroom or a $100 outlay to the beauty shop you wouldn't want to get it wet either.

3. You don't see a lot of black divers separately because we tend to clump in groups. I prefer to go on dive trips where I know I am welcome and tend to go back to the same hotel in Cozumel because I know exactly how I will be treated. I shop at Scubatoys (used to be 2Dive4) because I know how I will be treated. There is also an LDS owned by a black woman on the east coast that many of us use. If you talk to a alot of the members of the National Association of Black Scuba Divers which has a chapter in almost every major city most have been treated ****ty at one point or another so we tend to group. But Dr. Jose Jones has been recognized nationally as have many other members of that group. Just because you don't see us doesn't mean we aren't there. And trust me, dive gear is an equal opportunity money sucker :).

Some day people are going to wake up and realize that we must all stick together, or this world is going to be a terrible place to be in the future.


I just thought last night, the person next to you is just like you, only in a different way. In other words, "You're unique, just like everybody else."

mm2002
03-22-2008, 10:17
I just thought last night, the person next to you is just like you, only in a different way. In other words, "You're unique, just like everybody else."


Yep. It's not like we're totally different species who can't physically exist in the same environment. We're all human beings.

Garrobo
03-22-2008, 11:21
The ocean's a big place folks. There's room for all of us. And as far as being treated '****ty' I experienced that one time when I was on a boat with a bunch of young DIR divers. Of course I'm an old fart and didn't have many dives under my belt along with the fact that I'm pretty much of a Dork Diver and my gears shows it. But when I kept up with the youngies they lost the stupid crap after a couple dives.

coyote
03-22-2008, 14:35
We will never get passed this racism crap until society gets over the ultra sensitivity about even asking a question about another race. News flash!...We are all different. That's what makes life fun. I'm a curious person by nature. I want to know how things work, why things are the way they are. Maybe that's why I was drawn to scuba diving. As you all know, the underwater world is fascinating. If I'm going to be branded a racist everytime I ask a question about something that I don't understand them I'm going to stop asking the question. That's only going to make me more curious. I believe that fear of the unknown and ingnorance is the bases for racisism. Scuba divers by nature are curious. We are also very accepting of those that are different. If you love diving, no matter what other differences we have, we will always having something to talk about.

Very well said. Bravo.:smiley32:

mm2002
03-22-2008, 20:58
I just thought last night, the person next to you is just like you, only in a different way. In other words, "You're unique, just like everybody else."

I couldn't have said it better bro.

http://www.mm-restoration.com/scuba/unique.jpg
















okay, sorry. just thought I'd bust up the monotony a bit. :smiley5:

Judge
03-23-2008, 11:04
I prefer to go on dive trips where I know I am welcome and tend to go back to the same hotel in Cozumel because I know exactly how I will be treated. .


Not to completely bastardize the thread but I tend to go places where I know I will be treated well too. I am a "biker" tattood heavily/pierced/just one of the people that get security to follow them in high dollar stores. I am used to it...so I mess with them when I can

DollFin
03-23-2008, 13:31
My visual impairment has, at many times in my life, been the cause of discrimination and there were many times in my youuger days I was just flat out not allowed to do something because I was "different". It caused a lot of scars, however it left me with a deep understanding of how it feels to be discriminated against and not even allowed to prove I could do something. (There is a part of me that is just waiting for someone to tell me they don't want to dive with me because of my vision) It is such a shame that in this age of technological marvels, scientific discovery and all of the "progress" we pat ourselves on the back for, that there are still so many people who think anyone's skin color, disability, orientation, religion etc is cause to treat that person with less respect than someone else.

Rockhound76
03-24-2008, 07:28
One of the ladies at my gym in Houston is a member of an all black divers club. While I wish such clubs would go the way of all-white clubs, I understand the need.

They just got back from a trip, where (if I recall) they had about 80 divers.

I sail, and the sailing community has often lamented that too few blacks are into sailing. At first, it was blamed on the perception that most yacht clubs are racist (some are, sadly, but MOST modern successful clubs are not). Then, it was thought it was a socio-economic problem.

"Free" sailing clinics and clubs have popped up around the country to try and generate interest in sailing among the black community, but I know of none that have been successful, long-term. These days, many African-Americans or blacks or people of color or whatever are affluent enough to pursue sailing or diving, but few do.

I asked a long-time friend from Trinidad why he never learned to dive or evne swim (an educated, VERY affluent man). He told me, he grew up in a culture in Trinidad where it was not important. His friends didn't do it, his family didn't do it, so why should he?

I disagreed with his reasoning in part, but I got the point. It's sad, though. (Note: He now lives here and says he wants to learn to dive, just to see "what it's about".)

I will say, for example, that I now run across more and more blacks who dive, but most of them have been professionals in resorts.

Regarding women: More women go through classes each year than men, at least from my experience. When I lived in New Orleans, I was member of a 20 person dive club. 18 were women. Oddly enough, NO ONE in the club had a diving spouse, which made our trips a lot of fun for the non-divers (we planned for them, as well).

It was also one of the few times I had buddies with SAC rates similar to mine. No offense, but I told them it was their "spare lungs".

Garrobo
03-24-2008, 08:05
I discussed this issue with a black fellow I used to work with yesterday. He had shown an interest in diving when we talked about it several times before and that he is going ahead with it in April. He said that in his case and probably other blacks that he was worried that he would not be welcomed by the whites in the diving community especially down South. He's getting his pool stuff done at a local LDS and wants to go to the Keys with me on one of my monthly trips down there to do his OW and some reef diving. From what he has heard of the South from his friends and family he's worried about some cracker down there givng him some static. I explained to him that I doubted that that would be the case and that if he was with me I'd take care of any problems he couldn't solve on his own. I know that a lot of whites are predjudiced toward blacks, Latins and Asians, myself included to a degree, but what I have seen of the divers who I have been assocated with and the business people who I have been in contact with I am sure that he will have no problems at all and told him that he is welcome to accompany me at any time.

Rockhound76
03-24-2008, 09:15
As a southerner, I can tell you that we don't have the market on ignorance and prejudice all wrapped up, it's our marketing that's superior.

My southern accent labels me in the minds of folks who fail to see the irony.

Crackers, rednecks and "homeboys" come in all flavors and colors and are as likely to live in New Jersey or Ohio as in Alabama. No offense taken, but I want you to pass this along to your friend. He will be as welcome in many parts of the "developed" south as he would anywhere else.

DivingCRNA
03-24-2008, 09:40
This sure is a long thread for a simple topic....

SCUBA is a leisurely, relaxed activity! People usually do not race while SCUBA diving. It scares the fish and uses your air up too fast! Though, the DM swim tests feel like racing to me!

The only racing I see is to the buffet and the bar!

Oh... you are discussing something else... Never mind...