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cgvmer
03-19-2008, 21:33
So I am in the process of studying my PADI rescue manual and I came across the suggestion that the Pocket should be carried while diving.

Do any rescue diver carry the Pocket mask? Where do you stow the mask? On a BP/W?

terrillja
03-19-2008, 21:35
So I am in the process of studying my PADI rescue manual and I came across the suggestion that the Pocket should be carried while diving.

Do any rescue diver carry the Pocket mask? Where do you stow the mask? On a BP/W?
Always carry mine, right now I keep it in the utility pocket on my Oceanic Probe Lx, but I will stow it in a pocket I made to fit when I get my BP/W. Though there are plenty of commercially available pockets out there.

CompuDude
03-19-2008, 22:18
They fit in a pocket, as long as you don't have a ton of other stuff to keep in it.

I keep mine in my bag. Too much other stuff in my pocket.

If I was a full time medical rescue diver, it would be one thing, but... I'm not. Mouth to mouth will have to suffice... in the unlikely event that I actually find myself needing to give it.

coyote
03-20-2008, 06:38
If I'm just diving with a regular buddy then most likely not. If I'm with a large group of divers with varying skill levels I might put it in a pocket just in case
If I'm helping with OW checkout dives then always – that’s something the local shop is adamant about.

On a regular BCD I have a dedicate pocket for it. Nothing else ever goes in there. 99% of the time any dive I use a BP/W on requires a drysuit, so the mask goes in a pocket on the suit.

cummings66
03-20-2008, 07:26
Coyote has said it in the manner my lds does it, plus it's how some shops down in south mo operate.

cgvmer
03-20-2008, 09:53
Thanks for the replies.

texdiveguy
03-20-2008, 09:56
I have one in my dive bag at the dive site.

SkuaSeptember
03-20-2008, 14:29
I keep mine in the first aid kit. If I have to do rescue breaths in the ocean, I'll take my chances.

MSilvia
03-20-2008, 15:22
I keep mine in a box of dive junk in my basement, but I do keep one of these (http://www.redcrosstoledo.org/cart/store.php?crn=205&rn=379&action=show_detail) handy.

DivingCRNA
03-20-2008, 16:13
If I carried every piece of equipment everyone had a reason for I would be so heavy I could not get to the water.

I do not carry a pocket mask. Nor a spare air, or a quacker, a tank banger, a SNORKEL, a mirror or any of the bazillion money making "safety" devices.

It is enough to get in with a drysuit, long hose, doubles, BP/W, reel and lift bag.

chris in the socal
03-20-2008, 19:14
Im a Naui diver i dont carry mine but im also an emt and have learned to do it 10 different ways.

Crimediver
03-22-2008, 09:16
I don't carry one while I dive, but I have one nearby. I also have O2 kit and a suction unit as well.

in_cavediver
03-22-2008, 12:59
To me, the times to need a pocket mask in the water are small. Lets be honest - most dives, getting the victim to shore/boat is more important than half-@$%@ rescue breathing in water. Now, if you can't reasonable get to shore/boat, its a different matter. (and honestly, if they ain't breathing, they have a VERY low probability of survival being stuck in the water)

I vote for keeping the pocket mask next to the emergency O2 kit. (of course if you an EMT/Paramedic - add a tec kit as well). Ideal case to me is that you deliver the victim to waiting rescuers who take over initial patient care while you exit the water. The victim can get effective rescue breathing and CPR faster.

On a related note - how does being wet and in a wet environment relate to use of an AED? Does it screw with the analysis phase or the shock phase? I am sure its unit dependent but wondered if anyone had first hand information about it.

coyote
03-22-2008, 14:29
On a related note - how does being wet and in a wet environment relate to use of an AED? Does it screw with the analysis phase or the shock phase? I am sure its unit dependent but wondered if anyone had first hand information about it.

That's a heck of a good question. Food for thought.

fkostyun
03-22-2008, 16:07
On a related note - how does being wet and in a wet environment relate to use of an AED? Does it screw with the analysis phase or the shock phase? I am sure its unit dependent but wondered if anyone had first hand information about it.

When I went through my AED part of rescue/cpr - the persons chest will have to be dry for the shock pads to be able to adhere properly. The person should also be out of the water for obvious reasons.

You also have to remember, water can conduct electricity I personally don't think I want to use an AED with someone while there wet, laying in water, and me wet next to them.

in_cavediver
03-22-2008, 20:34
On a related note - how does being wet and in a wet environment relate to use of an AED? Does it screw with the analysis phase or the shock phase? I am sure its unit dependent but wondered if anyone had first hand information about it.

When I went through my AED part of rescue/cpr - the persons chest will have to be dry for the shock pads to be able to adhere properly. The person should also be out of the water for obvious reasons.

You also have to remember, water can conduct electricity I personally don't think I want to use an AED with someone while there wet, laying in water, and me wet next to them.

In the two classes I've had with AED's (AHA CPR and First Responder) some of that was discussed. Nothing though in a diving context where many if not all could be soaking wet. I think I'll ask our medical officer/medical director about it.

in_cavediver
03-22-2008, 21:27
Well, I just talked to our medical officer (fire dept and had a overcooked meal AFA run) and he was pretty sure that it wouldn't be an issue so long as you made sure to pat dry the pad attachment points. As for the shock transmittal to bystanders - even if it did propagate, you it wouldn't carry enough power to do anything. This is assuming the worst case. Most of the time, you'd be grounded via the boat as well.

scubasamurai
03-22-2008, 22:06
being an RN/Firefighter/american heart CPR instructor/rescue diver (haha) as for the aed it is Recommend that the person be reasonable dry. it is not so much as getting shock but the potential for arch of the current. this can cause injury to the patient and yourself. also if you can help it make sure that the aed unit is not in the water puddle, but above the diver like on a seat or towel. i did have someone get shocked due to arching because of the gel, but that is another story. basically use common sense with the electricity in the water setting

as for a pocket mask, i usually have it in the bag, the one way value if it was in the water usually will break down even with rising so your defeating the point of a barrier device. hopefully you will not be far from the boat so getting them out of the water , the diver has a better chance of survival. if i was on a shore dive or remote location and didn;t have the support of a close by boat i would carry it. thenew guidelines recommend more compressions to breaths they find that the body has a higher reserve of o2 than what was once thought before.











[quote=in_cavediver;148260]
On a related note - how does being wet and in a wet environment relate to use of an AED? Does it screw with the analysis phase or the shock phase? I am sure its unit dependent but wondered if anyone had first hand information about it.

When I went through my AED part of rescue/cpr - the persons chest will have to be dry for the shock pads to be able to adhere properly. The person should also be out of the water for obvious reasons.

You also have to remember, water can conduct electricity I personally don't think I want to use an AED with someone while there wet, laying in water, and me wet next to them.

In the two classes I've had with AED's (AHA CPR and First Responder) some of that was discussed. Nothing though in a diving context where many if not all could be soaking wet. I think I'll ask our medical officer/medical director about it.[/QUOT

comet24
03-22-2008, 22:24
I don't carry one when I dive. I do have one in my dive bag at the lake or one the boat. Doing rescue breathing in water over your head is not easy. Unless I am a good distance from removing the victim from the water I getting them out as quickly as I can.

AED and a wet environment can be cause for concern but not as much as some think. Dry the victims chest quickly with a towel or what ever is available and make show they are not laying in a puddle of water.

talonraid
04-01-2008, 00:00
I keep mine in the first aid kit back on the shore. If I have to give rescue breaths, then I would do it without the barrier. However, in most of the scenarios that I can think of in my usual local dive locations, I could get a victim back to shore very quickly. In those cases, it would be more valuable to get them on land and start chest compressions/defibrillation rather than wasting valuable seconds trying to give rescue breaths.

As a side note, I just left an EFR refresher and the instructor was telling us that they expect the breaths to go away and instead of doing 30 compressions and 2 breaths, it will be all compressions and no breaths. The reasoning is that the compressions will circulate oxygen enriched blood but the breaths don't tend to do much for someone who doesn't have a pulse anyway. The instructor said he expected the Red Cross to adopt this practice in the next few weeks/months.