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Scout
03-20-2008, 17:03
Most of the amateur pictures I've seen, and taken, of other divers are pretty uncomplimentary: mouths are messed up by the mask, eyes are squinty, and the gear just makes us look lumpy.

However, professional shots of men and women look really good. How do they do that?

Anyone have any tips about posing, lighting, angles, lenses, make-up etc?

CompuDude
03-20-2008, 17:23
They use professional models, with gear carefully chosen to LOOK good, rather than BE good.

Add a professional photographer, and you should get some great shots. ;)

skdvr
03-20-2008, 19:02
They use professional models, with gear carefully chosen to LOOK good, rather than BE good.

Add a professional photographer, and you should get some great shots. ;)

Sounds about right...

Phil

cummings66
03-20-2008, 21:34
Not to mention if it's like the place I work for they do tricks. We have a boat sales section to the store, one year we decided to do some advertising of boats more than normal so we hired this very nice looking woman for a layout.

Worked well, the pictures made you drool, and you should see the ones that don't get printed because too much shows, etc. We kept those around for a long time... The kicker was, it only worked because you chose the perfect model to go with the perfect bikini and boat. Nobody in real life would look that good, even she didn't until she dolled up.

I have seen few divers who could model scuba gear and look like the ads do, in fact only 2 come to mind.

DevilDiver
03-20-2008, 23:30
Most of the amateur pictures I've seen, and taken, of other divers are pretty uncomplimentary: mouths are messed up by the mask, eyes are squinty, and the gear just makes us look lumpy.

However, professional shots of men and women look really good. How do they do that?
Anyone have any tips about posing, lighting, angles, lenses, make-up etc?



There are articles in the dive mags from time to time with tips and some of the U/W photography books.

Here are some suggestions I will make for what it's worth.......

Basic model photo include silhouettes, portraits and action, maybe a near and far or any combination.
If you plan to photograph your DB talk about what types of pictures you plan to take in detail and discuss how you plan to do it. If you plan to take snapshots of anyone one the dive with you...it's a crap shoot and takes skill and luck and a very good eye on your part.
It helps if you have dove(dived...Oh, that's another thread) the spot before and know the terrain or locations that would work for backgrounds or interesting subjects for a divers to be photographed with. Find the spot and then put the diver in.
Work out hand signals to let the model know how you want them to swim into frame or hold steady and a signal to repeat and one to let them know you got the shot or give up and move on. Have a signal to let the model know you are set and ready to shoot as well.
If there is a current it helps to have them swim into it and ride it back to start over. This also slows the model down for the picture.
Have the would be model take a small light to illuminate interesting subjects to bring attention to.
The model should not look at the camera (unless this is what you want) but the subject. This takes practice and communication on both sides....
The model needs to have all hoses and gages clipped and not dangling, be able to hover without moving arms and legs awkwardly.
Make sure there are not other divers or something in background of the photo to take the viewers eyes off of your subject and ruin the perfect model photo.
Remember your rules of thirds, parallel lines and avoid backgrounds that will distract from you subject.As far as makeup, it's up to you. I am not judgemental......

Lighting is more of a basic photo question... Fill, ambient or whatever you need for the particular photo you want.

It's not uncommon to spend a whole dive in one spot working on getting the shot.

Get a big memory card and take lots of photos.........

bversteegh
03-21-2008, 00:05
First, you really need a wide angle lens, so the diver isn't nearly as far away as the forced perspective on most shots make it look. Find a nice scenic foreground with lots of blue water. Have your buddy or the model swim through your frame - and have them look at a subject - not the camera. Also, try to catch them between breaths. When the composition looks right, take the shot. Remember that if you want color/contrast on your model, they need to be relatively close - with a 15mm Fisheye lens - maybe 4 to 6 feet away.

jugglematt
04-07-2008, 05:05
i have modeled for a photographer . and some of her shots have won prizes in comps.
some of the previous points are very good .things that come to mind are .

clean gear no dangly bits.
good boyabcy, keep your legs together ,

work out signals that can be understood from a distance .
a model can sometimes see their reflection in the dome port of the photographers camera , and adjust their position in the water.

be patient a model may have to hover in one position sometimes for a whole dive and look like their happy doing so .

its worth wile getting it right as when it comes off the photos can look great

regards
Matt

Aussie
04-07-2008, 07:24
The other option is to try and get a great shot without having someone to pose and to have makeup. Being at the right place at the right time effect.

Here is some of my shots which I like. They are not professional but gives you an idea.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3271/2395865990_d45786fcd4.jpg

"Sarah & Monty" ......Monty is a friendly Blue Grouper who is missing his left fin.

Diver Dennis
04-23-2008, 18:58
These are some un-posed shots from a Deep dive on the Princess of the Orient here in the Philippines a couple weeks ago. We had 2 teams that did the 120M dive on each of two dive days. One of the things I did was make sure of my setting before I went in, I had 2 basic settings, one for near the surface and one for deeper, the first shot I was at 50M which is the deepest I went. Since these are more action than just posed shots, you have to be very comfortable in the water with your camera and I end up taking shots from all angles. A lot of the stuff I shoot upside down as in one of the shots here. Planning can give you some good shots without having to fumble with settings, especially when the subjects aren't going to stop just for a photo.

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j182/DiverDennis/_MG_3164.jpg

Deco is a lot easier to shot than descent...
http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j182/DiverDennis/_MG_3568copy.jpg

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j182/DiverDennis/_MG_3583copy.jpg

This is Ross Hemingway, the guy who did V-Planner, doing support and trying not to get sunburned...
http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j182/DiverDennis/_MG_3573copy.jpg

This was shot by a support diver of me with a couple of used stage bottles. Being upside down gives me an easy way to follow the rule of shooting up.
http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j182/DiverDennis/IMG_2091copy.jpg

Diver Dennis
04-23-2008, 19:05
This is a shot I took of my girlfriend at the time during the first ever trip I took with my camera. I took a course from Mike Veitch in Yap which was a huge head start for me as when I first got there I hadn't even taken the housing out of the shipping box. This shows the use of angles and shooting up. Both were taken in Truk. Not too bad but I still had a lot to learn at that point and I'm still learning today and trying new things. They are both a bit blown out with the bright sun. I almost exclusively shoot macro so my WA needs work.

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j182/DiverDennis/_MG_8493copy.jpg

http://i80.photobucket.com/albums/j182/DiverDennis/_MG_8567copy.jpg

CompuDude
04-23-2008, 19:10
Nice shots, Dennis!

mixahl
04-23-2008, 19:14
Diver dennis, what camera were you using?

harb99
04-23-2008, 23:09
those look very nice Diver Dennis.

Diver Dennis
04-24-2008, 06:56
Thanks. I'm using Rebel XT, 350D, which is only an 8 MP camera but it works for me. Over 90% of the shots I take are macro and I try to frame shots while shooting so I rarely crop any more. None of the shots there are cropped. I'm thinking of moving up to a 5D but that means a new housing as well...:D




My wife will kill me, if she finds out... he he he

Aussie
04-24-2008, 22:10
Heres a pic of a young French lad who was on the Liveaboard last week. Right place at the right time.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2132/2440307238_faaa7cb00c.jpg

mixahl
04-24-2008, 23:08
Thanks. I'm using Rebel XT, 350D, which is only an 8 MP camera but it works for me. Over 90% of the shots I take are macro and I try to frame shots while shooting so I rarely crop any more. None of the shots there are cropped. I'm thinking of moving up to a 5D but that means a new housing as well...:D




My wife will kill me, if she finds out... he he he

Those pics are just amazing....what lens are you using? Im thinking of getting the new rebel xsi....looks good

Diver Dennis
04-25-2008, 20:11
Thanks! Canon 10-22mm. I'm jealous of the new Canons. I'd would definitely buy an xsi if it fit my housing.

texdiveguy
04-25-2008, 20:33
Very sweet job Dennis!

diver 85
04-27-2008, 00:04
They use professional models, with gear carefully chosen to LOOK good, rather than BE good.

Add a professional photographer, and you should get some great shots. ;)


....and add about 1000 shots per 'great pic'(@ least in the old days, now we have P-h-o-t-o-s-h-o-p......:))

TxScubaBear
04-30-2008, 21:01
Dennis, very nice! Thank you for sharing with us!

elijahb
04-30-2008, 21:21
have not found a complementary picture of a diver done by a none pro photographer. It is hard cause of the mask glare from the strobes.

Aussie
04-30-2008, 23:41
I am not a pro but I think this shot of Ewan (Spirit of Freedom tour director) is a Complimentary shot.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3247/2455443957_bd30d7806c.jpg

Nikon D80 with Tokina 10-17mm


Aussie

CompuDude
05-01-2008, 15:53
Not fair, Aussie, you're not a pro but probably could be if you wanted. :P

Ewan needs to clean up his dangling console!

Sounder
05-01-2008, 17:33
Ewan needs to clean up his dangling console!
Funny, I thought the same thing. :smilie39:

allison finch
05-05-2008, 22:18
a couple of mine....

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1218/1362674063_d7920f6433_o.jpg


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2300/2074673835_667282f473_o.jpg

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2296/2075535014_faa4d381dd_o.jpg

Aussie
05-06-2008, 09:01
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2353/2429830253_f74c4b437a.jpg

Self taken photo. Its not the best shot as its an effort to hold in one hand a dSLR with twin ikelite ds125 strobe and shoot at the same time, but I am getting better at it. Also i didnt handle the Patato Cod in any manner.

aussie

fisheater
05-11-2008, 09:51
This one didn't turn out too bad.

The diver's name is Pablo and he's on his second OW dive, during his NAUI class. The instructor was kind enough to allow me to dive with the class. We're at Gerstle Cove in Salt Point State Park on the Sonoma, California coast. Pablo's going to be a great diver. Not only are his skills together, but he's having fun in 44 degree water.

http://www.scubaboard.com/gallery/data/500/medium/GerstleCove051008_060.jpg

Geoff_T
05-11-2008, 22:33
One thing to remember that was only touched on is the quality of the camera. IE. megapixl count and lense quality. I can tell you from experiance as a surface photographer that the change in clarity from a consumer grade $100 lense to a high end $1200 lense is immense in terms of color and clarity. Another major facter that people have hinted on is knowing the location in many cases scouting it ahead of time going without the model and diving or on land walking it to see what it is like at the time of day you are shooting.

fisheater
05-13-2008, 00:24
I used GIMP 2 (free photo editing software, that I'm just now learning a little bit about) to improve the color, contrast and brightness of the above photo.

http://www.scubaboard.com/gallery/data/500/medium/Gestle_Pablo_edited.jpg

dannybot
05-19-2008, 20:13
Found a couple: Sorry about hte backscatter and color, just got a flash.

coral cowgirl
05-21-2008, 16:45
Most of the amateur pictures I've seen, and taken, of other divers are pretty uncomplimentary: mouths are messed up by the mask, eyes are squinty, and the gear just makes us look lumpy.

However, professional shots of men and women look really good. How do they do that?
Anyone have any tips about posing, lighting, angles, lenses, make-up etc?



There are articles in the dive mags from time to time with tips and some of the U/W photography books.

Here are some suggestions I will make for what it's worth.......

Basic model photo include silhouettes, portraits and action, maybe a near and far or any combination.
If you plan to photograph your DB talk about what types of pictures you plan to take in detail and discuss how you plan to do it. If you plan to take snapshots of anyone one the dive with you...it's a crap shoot and takes skill and luck and a very good eye on your part.
It helps if you have dove(dived...Oh, that's another thread) the spot before and know the terrain or locations that would work for backgrounds or interesting subjects for a divers to be photographed with. Find the spot and then put the diver in.
Work out hand signals to let the model know how you want them to swim into frame or hold steady and a signal to repeat and one to let them know you got the shot or give up and move on. Have a signal to let the model know you are set and ready to shoot as well.
If there is a current it helps to have them swim into it and ride it back to start over. This also slows the model down for the picture.
Have the would be model take a small light to illuminate interesting subjects to bring attention to.
The model should not look at the camera (unless this is what you want) but the subject. This takes practice and communication on both sides....
The model needs to have all hoses and gages clipped and not dangling, be able to hover without moving arms and legs awkwardly.
Make sure there are not other divers or something in background of the photo to take the viewers eyes off of your subject and ruin the perfect model photo.
Remember your rules of thirds, parallel lines and avoid backgrounds that will distract from you subject.As far as makeup, it's up to you. I am not judgemental......

Lighting is more of a basic photo question... Fill, ambient or whatever you need for the particular photo you want.

It's not uncommon to spend a whole dive in one spot working on getting the shot.

Get a big memory card and take lots of photos.........

Wow, pretty well sums it up. Especially liked the tip on model swimming into current for shot. And, add....Lose the snorkel...it ruins shots quicker than anything. Think I'll print it out for future ref.!

RoyN
05-21-2008, 16:52
http://inlinethumb24.webshots.com/39383/2827462290101309303S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2827462290101309303ynQFzR)

http://inlinethumb49.webshots.com/35184/2882897020101309303S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2882897020101309303eNnexh)

DevilDiver
08-30-2008, 18:54
This Grouper just came up and nuzzled her like a puppy.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3060/2811757847_466d285cfa.jpg

Exposure:0.001 sec (1/1000)
Aperture:f/5.1
Focal Length:5.1 mm
ISO Speed:200
Exposure Bias:0/10 EV

Flatliner
08-30-2008, 19:31
This Grouper just came up and nuzzled her like a puppy.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3060/2811757847_466d285cfa.jpg

Exposure:0.001 sec (1/1000)
Aperture:f/5.1
Focal Length:5.1 mm
ISO Speed:200
Exposure Bias:0/10 EV

Great shot, but what's with the clip on her right arm?

DevilDiver
09-02-2008, 15:20
Ahhh... The Zeagle does not have a D-Ring on the shoulder strap so she has a suicide clip on the end of the strap to clip a mask or whatever to while on the boat. Good catch, never noticed it hanging like that, could be the angle.

Thanks for the compliment!

CompuDude
09-02-2008, 19:32
Nice shot!

Touching the fishies is bad, though.

DevilDiver
09-02-2008, 22:39
Nice shot!

Touching the fishies is bad, though.

Thanks!

I agree that touching any fish is a bad practice but someone forgot to tell these grouper. They would come up and nuzzel you in mid water, 2 or 3 of them at times. If you came to rest in a sand flat they would swim up and lay in your lap like a puppy.:smiley5: Some of these were 35lb fish. I am sure if the fish wanted to it could leave at any time.

DevilDiver
09-02-2008, 22:45
Here is a diver photo that I really like. This is Illini_Fan diving a working oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3087/2751969046_e1e36c9e2e.jpg
Exposure:0.008 sec (1/125)
Aperture:f/6.8
Focal Length:6 mm
ISO Speed:100
Exposure Bias:0/10 EV

DevilDiver
09-02-2008, 23:01
I like this one as well, I know it isn't going to win any contest but I always stop and look at it.

"Follow the diver...."
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3270/2813655579_f52330ba07.jpg
Exposure:0.008 sec (1/125)
Aperture:f/6.5
Focal Length:5.1 mm
ISO Speed:100
Exposure Bias:0/10 EV

CompuDude
09-02-2008, 23:38
I can't take credit for this (obviously), but here's a shot my buddy took of yours truly this past weekend, diving some SoCal oil rigs.

http://scottpenny.smugmug.com/photos/363775939_7sJb3-L.jpg

bversteegh
09-03-2008, 21:48
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3001/2783330200_05abab02b6_o.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3011/2783330554_c17c841a9b_o.jpg

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3022/2783330446_69020b7867_o.jpg


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2383/2233641859_c31835ebb2_o.jpg


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2103/2234429440_552151b292_o.jpg

jugglematt
09-04-2008, 00:13
some nice shots ,

im also trying hard to get some nice shots with divers in them

what i did on my last trip to Malaysia was , i set up at a likley looking subject ect a gorgonia or soft coral , and shot off a few frames to get the foreground and background exposure correct , then i lay in wait to snap like crazy if a diver swims past . they probally do get blinded by me shooting off multiple frames as they pass by .

a suggestion we made in our group was , if your swiming along and see somone lining up a shot just keep swiming as usual that way if the photographer wants to they can shoot you in the frame , and if they dont want you in the shot you pass through fairly quickly , it seemed to work really well for us .

anyway here are a few of my recent shots

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3024/2703502484_52e5642b2d.jpg



http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3021/2703503128_ed55677fe8.jpg



http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3190/2703499118_d740f1827e.jpg



comments walcome


regards
Matt

bversteegh
09-06-2008, 21:39
some nice shots ,

im also trying hard to get some nice shots with divers in them

what i did on my last trip to Malaysia was , i set up at a likley looking subject ect a gorgonia or soft coral , and shot off a few frames to get the foreground and background exposure correct , then i lay in wait to snap like crazy if a diver swims past . they probally do get blinded by me shooting off multiple frames as they pass by .

a suggestion we made in our group was , if your swiming along and see somone lining up a shot just keep swiming as usual that way if the photographer wants to they can shoot you in the frame , and if they dont want you in the shot you pass through fairly quickly , it seemed to work really well for us .

anyway here are a few of my recent shots

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3024/2703502484_52e5642b2d.jpg



http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3021/2703503128_ed55677fe8.jpg



http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3190/2703499118_d740f1827e.jpg



comments walcome


regards
Matt

I like them - I'd be happy with any of them. I've yet to ever do a dive with someone actually modeling, mine are all just targets of opportunity - plus, I shoot macro 80% of the time.

If anything, I'd have the model even closer. That's the problem with wide angle - stuff gets small in a hurry. But again - these are sure a really nice start.

megzuwo
09-06-2008, 23:44
Love all of the tips everyone! I do videography for my job and we just got an ikelite housing kit for my Sony PD 170, plus we're working with the Nikon D80's. I'm trying to incorporate the photo help with the D80, but does anyone have any advice on the filming factor? I've been doing above-ground video for about 6 years, but underwater is a whole new world for me. Is there a time of day to get the best composition? Best way to attempt a steady shot? Any help would be absolutely amazing, thanks!!

DevilDiver
09-07-2008, 02:07
some nice shots ,

im also trying hard to get some nice shots with divers in them

what i did on my last trip to Malaysia was , i set up at a likley looking subject ect a gorgonia or soft coral , and shot off a few frames to get the foreground and background exposure correct , then i lay in wait to snap like crazy if a diver swims past . they probally do get blinded by me shooting off multiple frames as they pass by .

a suggestion we made in our group was , if your swiming along and see somone lining up a shot just keep swiming as usual that way if the photographer wants to they can shoot you in the frame , and if they dont want you in the shot you pass through fairly quickly , it seemed to work really well for us .

anyway here are a few of my recent shots

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3024/2703502484_52e5642b2d.jpg



http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3021/2703503128_ed55677fe8.jpg



http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3190/2703499118_d740f1827e.jpg



comments walcome


regards
Matt


Great shots!! I love the exposure. This is really nice work....:smiley20:

reeldive
09-08-2008, 15:11
I'll go with the "All you need is a great model." theory.

Here's proof your truly - and taken by my wife

roby jeff
12-30-2008, 06:40
http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/1/0/3/5/0/imag0184_copy.jpg
i used this in a photo story and slowly zooming in made this pick look great.