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View Full Version : Diving at night...is it creepy?



Cichlid
08-01-2007, 18:31
I don't think it will be my cup of tea, seeing that getting into a dark pool gives me the creeps. Why do you guys do it? Is it just to see the nocturnal creatures or what?

ParrotHead
08-01-2007, 18:37
Let me tell you something - When I did my night dive (as part of my AOW class) - everything clicked. My buoyancy was spot on - my senses were heightened - it was just a great dive. It was the only night dive I've done, but I would definitely do another.

ScubaToys Larry
08-01-2007, 18:41
I'd trade one night dive for 4 day dives. It's so peaceful, so many neat critters you don't see during the day, fish sleeping, octos out hunting, lobsters and crabs crawling around, coral pollups out filtering... It's great!

And you see more. When you day dive, you are looking at the whole ocean - as far as the vis goes. When night diving, you are focused where you light is, so you get more concentrated on some of the neater and smaller things the ocean has to offer!

Try it! You won't be sorry! But report back!

Wolfie2012
08-01-2007, 18:42
I took my wife on her first night dive just a few weeks ago. Every day up until the point of entering the water she was very apprehensive about doing it. She had that innate fear of things she can't see.

The second she hit the water and went under she was in awe at how beautiful a night dive can be. She came up afterwards and as much as she hated to admit that I was right - she absolutely loved it.

TAH 73
08-01-2007, 18:50
Echoing the above statement's. A night dive becomes almost surreal, one piece of advice I might give is if you apprehensive about doing a night dive try and do it in an are where you have dove previously. I had the opportunity to dive in an area where I had done quite a few dives, (to the point where it had become boring and mundane) and diving at night refreshed the enthusiasm for diving in the area, and it seemed like it was a new dive area again.

DirtyWaterIL
08-01-2007, 18:51
you see so much more on a ngiht dive its incredible. i never got a creepy feeling while doing one. The only thing i don;t like is it canbe kind of a pain int he ass at the end breaking down your gear in the dark.

Queen
08-01-2007, 18:53
I adore night dives! It feels like flying and the nocturnal fishys are amazing! :thumb:

starfish sandy
08-01-2007, 18:57
I agree! Night dives are great - we did a night dive in Cozumel a few years back in a ripping current - stuff just flew by - it was a full moon - it was a great dive!

thesmoothdome
08-01-2007, 19:04
Nothing scary about night diving. If something creepy does come within range of your light, just turn it off and it's gone. No worries. :smiley2:

Cichlid
08-01-2007, 19:07
Nothing scary about night diving. If something creepy does come within range of your light, just turn it off and it's gone. No worries. :smiley2:

That's funny, does closing your eyes during day dives work the same? :)

Splitlip
08-01-2007, 19:08
I like them. They tend to be more low key. There is usually enough ambient light around to make out shapes. Then when you hit somehting with your light it explodes in color.
You get real close to sleeping fish that might otherwise run from you. (Please don't touch them and please don't everybody put your high beams on the little guys all at once).
I also enjoy very much, hitting the Brass Ring Pub afterwards for a cold pitcher and a burger.
Your apprehension is normal. Once you splash however it will fade quickly.

Splitlip
08-01-2007, 19:10
I'd trade one night dive for 4 day dives. It's so peaceful, so many neat critters you don't see during the day, fish sleeping, octos out hunting, lobsters and crabs crawling around, coral pollups out filtering... It's great!

And you see more. When you day dive, you are looking at the whole ocean - as far as the vis goes. When night diving, you are focused where you light is, so you get more concentrated on some of the neater and smaller things the ocean has to offer!

Try it! You won't be sorry! But report back!

What the Big Guy said.

WaterRat
08-01-2007, 22:03
The whole time I lived in FL we did the evening dives. 1st dive was just before dark and the second was a night dive. Those were the best dives.

Ron

Moxie
08-01-2007, 22:20
I've not done enough of them, but I do like them. I prefer them in familiar areas though so I don't fall on my face getting into the water.

Centerius
08-01-2007, 22:21
I'll be doing my first night dive in a few days in Key Largo. I'll be sure to post how it went!

dmdoss
08-01-2007, 22:22
When night diving, you are focused where you light is, so you get more concentrated on some of the neater and smaller things the ocean has to offer!

Try it! You won't be sorry! But report back!


Larry has been diving naked to?

TxHockeyGuy
08-01-2007, 22:37
Guess I'll be the one to report the opposite, at least for my first dive. I hated my very first night dive. I initially was a little apprehensive about the dive but calmed down when I got under, until something very slimy started to brush up against my leg. I don't know who was more scared, me or the catfish. Although I got a good chuckle about it later the entire rest of the dive was not fun for me.

That being said all subsequent night dives have been exactly as everyone else has said, they are now much more enjoyable than my day dives.

bversteegh
08-02-2007, 00:15
I agree with majority above - night dives are awesome; I never miss an opportunity for a night dive.

Lot's of corals only feed at night to keep from being eaten by the fish - you will be amazed at the difference when you see a familiar hard coral with open polyps at night - truly amazing.

Another interesting time to dive is at dusk - lot's of fish spawn as the sun is setting; also very neat to watch.

A couple of pieces of advice for night diving:

Always carry a spare light; even one of the small 3A lights is fine for a backup. Wear a wetsuit, even if the water is warm. More stinging stuff is out at night (jellyfish, sea wasps, etc), an ounce of prevention......

the gooch
08-02-2007, 01:20
Night dives are awesome. When I was in Roatan we did a night dive right off of West Bay Beach and towards the end of the dive we shut our lights off and enjoyed the bioluminescence, it was very peaceful.

picxie
08-02-2007, 04:26
As most of the others have said, night dives can be very different to day dives. Very peaceful and surreal. I do tend to get a little bit jumpy at first though. I think my last night dive left me very jumpy - turned around at one point and came face to face with a stingray (my 'ocean creature I'm afraid off') which freaked me out a bit. Then when we surfaced we had a bit of a swim to the boat. It was dark, in the middle of the ocean, and you could hear the seagulls flying around (yep, at night). A bit unsettling. But the dive itself was fantastic.

edger
08-02-2007, 09:25
My only experience close to a night dive was two cenote dives in the Yucatan. It was a bit creepy for me, especially when you look up and only see rock. A lady on our dive couldn't get her buoyancy right and kept smacking into the ceiling or stirring up the silt.

No Misses
08-02-2007, 10:18
Here is a copy of a recent email ref; Night dives

During one of our nocturnal libation sessions, someone put forth the proposition that “we should start the first day of lobster mini-season with a midnight dive”. At the time this seemed like a brilliant idea. All too quickly, the days ticked by. This idea started sounding a little crazy. None of us had done a night dive in several years. Some of us had never done a night dive. But, we were all too proud to back out now. The time came and out we went, into the black abyss. There was a 3/4 moon overhead and almost no clouds in the sky. It is an eerie feeling, wondering what lurks outside of your flashlights beam. Hunting Lobsters at night is 180 degrees different from daylight hunts. During the day, you look for ledges, coral heads and holes for the lobsters to be hiding in. At night they freely roam the reef. This is a good thing, since finding “structure” is very difficult at night. As you sweep your light across the reef, you need to look for the reflection of their eyes. Once you spot a bug, you must keep your light on it. If you shine the light away, they run and hide. While keeping them frozen in your light, you just swim up and grab them from behind. It’s almost too easy. Finding the lobster this way is the only hard part. There is no rhyme or reason as to where they will be. Although I have never seen it, I have heard tales of people witnessing “lobster walks”. This is where dozens of bugs are walking single file down the reef. Supposedly, you can just grab your limit as they pass by. We did not find any congregation of bugs. Every one was out by itself. We didn’t come anywhere close to our limit of 12 lobsters per person. I think we averaged about 4 per person. On the flip side, these night dives were way cool. We saw numerous fish sleeping on the reef. They didn’t even wake up when you held your light 6 inches from them. The colors that are usually muted by the waters depth were vibrantly illuminated by our lights (red is the first color to be filtered out by sea water). All of the animals that we saw were at close range. They did not seem to fear the light. We saw turtles, basket stars, eels, a spotted eagle ray, and many more. On our accent to the surface, Ed and I made the customary safety stop at 15-20 feet. While slowly kicking to hold my depth, I looked down and noticed all of the dinoflagellates illuminating. The turbulence from my fins was causing them to light up and spiral down. It was like swimming in stars. We turned off our lights and enjoyed the show while completing our safety stop.

P.S. the lobsters were tasty ;-)

…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… …
Here is an excerpt from; http://www.geo.ucalgary.ca/~macrae/palynology/dinoflagellates/dinoflagellates.html
What are dinoflagellates?

Dinoflagellates are microscopic, (usually) unicellular, flagellated, often photosynthetic protists, commonly regarded as "algae" (Division Dinoflagellata). They are characterized by a transverse flagellum that encircles the body (often in a groove known as the cingulum) and a longitudinal flagellum oriented perpendicular to the transverse flagellum. This imparts a distinctive spiral to their swimming motion. Both flagella are inserted at the same point in the cell wall, by convention defining the ventral surface. This point is usually slightly depressed, and is termed the sulcus. In heterotrophic dinoflagellates (ones that eat other organisms), this is the point where a conical feeding structure, the peduncle, is projected in order to consume food.
Dinoflagellates possess a unique nuclear structure at some stage of their life cycle - a dinokaryotic nucleus (as opposed to eukaryotic or prokaryotic), in which the chromosomes are perminently condensed. The cell wall of many dinoflagellates is divided into plates of cellulose ("armor") within amphiesmal vesicles, known as a theca. These plates form a distinctive geometry/topology known as tabulation, which is the main means for classification.
Both heterotrophic (eat other organisms) and autotrophic (photosynthetic) dinoflagellates are known. Some are both. They form a significant part of primary planktonic production in both oceans and lakes. Most dinoflagellates go through moderately complex life cycles involving several steps, both sexual and asexual, motile and non-motile. Some species form cysts composed of sporopollenin (an organic polymer), and preserve as fossils. Often the tabulation of the cell wall is somehow expressed in the shape and/or ornamentation of the cyst.

Wolfie2012
08-02-2007, 10:26
One of the cool things about night dives is seeing the bioluminescence. Try covering your light entirely, wait a minute for your eyes to adjust, and then wave your hand in front of your face... you'll excite the little glowies and it looks pretty cool :)

torrey
08-02-2007, 10:44
Ocean night dives are my favorite dives. I've seen people who were absolutely terrified to try it and the DM actually had to hold their hand to get them in the water...but once in, they loved it. You just have to get past that initial fear and join the club. I'm willing to bet it will become the hi-lite of your dives.

tremtech
08-02-2007, 11:07
We most of the time before making a night dive try to do an orientation dive, this will take most of the fear away from the new night diver as well as letting them prep their gear in the light , it also lets them find the area's that are of interest when the lights go out.

Wolfie2012
08-02-2007, 11:11
We most of the time before making a night dive try to do an orientation dive, this will take most of the fear away from the new night diver as well as letting them prep their gear in the light , it also lets them find the area's that are of interest when the lights go out.

It also helped my wife when she did it that we arrived at the site shortly before it got dark and had the opportunity to snorkle around the boat just to check the layout.

GlockGuy
08-02-2007, 16:38
I absolutely LOVE to dive at night. Actually, dusk and dawn are best, as one set of critters is going to bed while another set is just getting active.

On the cheap - Some of the best markers we found were the cylume bracelets that we get 15/$1 at Dollar General. Brake 'em, shake 'em and snap them around your tank valve. Not so bright as to ruin your night vision, but easy to identify those in your group.

I'm also a fan of spending a few minutes with your light off, stirring up the water for the light show.

My last night dive, we hovered on our backs at 30' and just stared at a full moon... AWESOME!

CompuDude
08-02-2007, 18:56
Nights rock. LOVE them... it's often tough to decide which I like better.

I've loved it since my first one. A little nervous getting in the first time, and then it was like "Oh, is that it? Hey, COOL!"

Wear exposure protection... it's a lot easier to brush against something sharp at night, like sea urchins, and they can hurt to get poked by.

If you're in an area with bio-luminescence, be sure to settle in somewhere safe and cover your lights for a minute to two to play with it... it's awesome!

Enjoy the colors and life you never see during the day... the ambient light washes out your dive light during the day, so the most vibrant colors come out at night, illuminated only by your dive light.

Night diving rocks. :-)

PlatypusMan
08-02-2007, 20:24
My personal preference is to catch the setting sun slowly leading into darkness. That's the time when there is a "changing of the guard", as the daytime group goes to sleep and the night group takes over the reef.

Some great photographic opportunities occur at this time.

Splitlip
08-02-2007, 20:29
When night diving, you are focused where you light is, so you get more concentrated on some of the neater and smaller things the ocean has to offer!

Try it! You won't be sorry! But report back!


Larry has been diving naked to?

Thanks for the visual guy. TMI

bperrybap
08-02-2007, 20:35
I don't think it will be my cup of tea, seeing that getting into a dark pool gives me the creeps. Why do you guys do it? Is it just to see the nocturnal creatures or what?

You might try a twilight dive to help break the ice.
You enter the water just about sunset while it is still
a little bit light and then it gets dark during your dive.
It keeps you from having to jump into the black abyss.
You won't see some of the night creatures because many
of them don't come out until a few hours after dark but
you still will get to see some things that are not out
during full daylight.

The other thing my wife likes are sunrise dives.
You enter the water while its still dark and by the time
you end the dive, it is daylight and you don't even
need your light anymore.

Both of these are nice because you get to see a
little bit of both night and day creatures.

--- bill

JodiBB
08-02-2007, 21:04
I like night dives, but I will admit that descending in Catalina Kelp Forests at night does give me the creeps. The kelp is so large that hitting a light unexpectedly on a stalk can look a bit like a large monster in the night. Freaked me out the first time until I realized what I was looking at.

I just did a night dive in Jamaica...now that was such a pleasure!!!

94GTStang
08-03-2007, 00:43
We just came back from Coz and did two night dives. Last year we did one and afterwards wanted to do more next year... which we did. It's so amazing at night and there is nothing to be afraid of. Plus it's really peaceful coming back up and sitting on top of the surface looking down.

Dive-aholic
08-03-2007, 02:46
It's like a new shift of marine life comes out at night. The later the night dive, the better. Some of my best dives have been night dives. In fact, I saw 3 very large eels on 1 night dive once. It was a great dive! Besides, a lot less divers are diving at night so it's usually much less crowded. I even prefer to dive caves at night sometimes.

Skinsfan1311
08-03-2007, 11:16
It's surreal. I love night dives!

Just don't blind your buddy!

quarrydiver
08-11-2007, 18:17
much creepier to dive in a murky lake than to night dive in the ocean. new set of critters come out after dark. once you get in the water the fear will be gone.

DivingsInMyBlood
08-11-2007, 18:33
I cant wait untill i do a night dive.

plot
08-11-2007, 20:55
i enjoy night dives more than day dives just becuase you're focused into an area and if you do it right you can keep track of your buddy pretty easily (since it's a bright light glaring around you)

its only creepy/scary if you're in the mood to be creeped out/scared. normally once you're in the water it all goes away and you're ready to get on with the dive.

the gooch
08-11-2007, 23:01
Just did a night dive with the wife last night since I bought her some new lights from ST. I am not going to lie, every time I go on a night dive I manage to spook myself out for no apparent reason.

We did an easy entry shore dive that I do on a regular basis and know the reef pretty well by sight alone. For some reason I always feel like some big ass fish (shark) is always just outside of my light beam laughing at my ass. Call me paranoid but that is just the way it is.

We were hunting bugs and found 3 but all of them were shorts. It was my wife's first night dive in a while so we went out just as the sun was setting to witness the changing of the guard and saw our fair share of cool reef critters. All in all a pretty good dive considering the vis was pretty crummy. Saw some reef squid, nurse shark, lobster, crabs, sleeping parrot fish, big conch, and a host of other critters that we normally see during the day but were not too fond of our lights.

I love night dives but I don't think I will ever get over those back of the mind jitters i always seem to muster up.

Splitlip
08-12-2007, 08:30
A swimming shark can startle you on a night dive since the world as you know it exists soley within the limits of of the your light's beam. It can be a bit of a surprise and even unnerving when you light them up.

I was on a night dive recently trying to stay away from the crowd by slowly drifting about 15 or 20 feet from the others. I had been holding my light against my chest taking in the darkness and looking for bioluminesence when I decided to swing my light 360 just for grins. I brought it across my left hip and there a few feet behind me and a couple ft below me was a 6 footer. As soon as I put the light on him he flicked his tail and was gone.
You gotta wonder how long was he there and did he know you were there (yes)

Zenagirl
08-12-2007, 08:34
We did our first night dives on our last trip to the Bahamas and really enjoyed it (except for the blood worms!). I admit that we didn't get too far from the boat since we weren't sure about navigation, but the water was clear and it wasn't that big of a deal. Later in the trip we did a twilight dive that turned into a night dive and I enjoyed that a lot more. It was really cool to splash into the water in the dimming light, get oriented, then enjoy watching the change over to the night creatures.

coyote
08-13-2007, 14:09
I got hooked on night diving in Bull Shoals. Really great stuff. But be sure you’re swimming towards the light on the boat and not the moon. :smiley13:

thor
08-13-2007, 14:14
Night dives are the closest thing you will ever get to feeling like you are in outer space ( unless of coarse you are an astronaut)

3rdEye
08-13-2007, 23:21
looking forward to my first night dive....I'm sure I'll love it

Centerius
08-13-2007, 23:27
Well, my night dive was awesome. It was really cool and not scary at all. The first thing I saw when we jumped in the water was a nurse shark. It's amazing the things that come out at night. :)

NavyDM
08-14-2007, 06:03
I would say most of my great dive were at night. I had a turtle swim up to see the light. An Octo in my hand. Came up on a sleeping nurse shark one night. Squid possing for the camera. Fish that will set in your hand. A sleeping Golith Grouper. Sleeping turtles. Getting lobster. Hunting is better. I got pic of a great urchin which are normally 300ft plus I was told. A puffer in my hand. Too many others to name.

You see more and you get close. That and you have a hard time lossing your dive buddy because you can see there light if you get too far away. If you go on a moon light night you can see all kinds of stuff with your lights off even.

dallasdivergirl
08-14-2007, 13:05
I will say that my first night dive I did a full on freak out due to the sea urchins and the monster eel that I had seen the night before playing around out by the dock. Luckily the DM was very patient with me and parked us on the sand patch.

My second night dive was just this last weekend at Lake Travis and was ok (I have been spoiled by blue water).

Hopefully in my trip to Bonaire I will have some good night dives.

ocean_dreamer
08-14-2007, 13:18
i just did my first night dive in aow class at lake travis and hated it! i am looking forward to a night dive in cozumel. i am confident there will be a big difference. never again will i do a night dive in a lake.

chinacat46
08-14-2007, 14:19
I love night diving and a couple of the night dives I did in Lembeh Strait are the best dives I've ever done. There was so much to see our brains were on overload. We were checking out a stargazer when a huge decorator crab walked right up to us to see what we were looking at. It was just amazing. I still look back at those two dives and shake my head in wonderment every time I think about them.

BigASG
08-14-2007, 19:28
I will say that my first night dive I did a full on freak out due to the sea urchins and the monster eel that I had seen the night before playing around out by the dock. Luckily the DM was very patient with me and parked us on the sand patch.

My second night dive was just this last weekend at Lake Travis and was ok (I have been spoiled by blue water).

Hopefully in my trip to Bonaire I will have some good night dives.
You will love Bonaire! All the scuba pubs say that the towne pier night dive is a must do. It's ok if you're into seeing a bunch of orange cup coral. I actually had a great night dive right off of Captain Don's reef where we came across the absolutely biggest green moray I have ever seen! It was a thing of beauty to say the least & I followed it around for as long as I could frantically trying to get a picture. I highly recommend a night dive there. Have fun!

Krakenn
08-22-2007, 05:16
One of the greatest things about night diving for me is how focused you are on the things in your beam rather than all over the place.

Kraks

Charlotte Smith
08-22-2007, 05:51
It is really something to see at night especially with a great light...like another world......you should at least try it once!

gtjason2000
08-22-2007, 08:07
I was a little hesitant to try it. I just couldn't wrap my brain around it being pitch black and jumping into pitch black bottomless pit. But luckily I eased into it for my night diver specialty. It was a shore dive so we waded out and we went before the sun was down so it actually was light out when we started but night when we finished. That is how I suggest anyone who is hesitant to try it first. There was so much cool stuff to see at night that it is well worth it.

JugglingMonkeys
08-22-2007, 08:15
anything special needed for a night dive?

apart from a light and backup light?

CompuDude
08-22-2007, 13:25
anything special needed for a night dive?

apart from a light and backup light?

A compass and a sense of direction help. :D

(assuming you want to get back where you started from!)

But no, that's all that's really required. It's not a bad idea to have a permanent marker light attached to you also, like a glowstick or a glo-toob.

ScubaJenn81
08-22-2007, 14:27
I have done only one night dive as part of my AOW and I tell you it was scary as heck. It was in a quarry where I did dive before, but it was murkier then normal and the thing that were sunk (stop signs, chirstmas tree, big rocks, etc) were jumping out from no where, since you could not see them from far away. My buddy was not having a good time either, so we surfaced and swam back on the top of the water. I will try it again one day, but not the best way to start out something that s lot of people love.

JugglingMonkeys
08-23-2007, 01:17
anything special needed for a night dive?

apart from a light and backup light?

A compass and a sense of direction help. :D

(assuming you want to get back where you started from!)

But no, that's all that's really required. It's not a bad idea to have a permanent marker light attached to you also, like a glowstick or a glo-toob.

great advice! thanks

i'm not too great on sense of direction though.
:smiley11:

gtjason2000
08-23-2007, 07:49
I have done only one night dive as part of my AOW and I tell you it was scary as heck. It was in a quarry.

I definitely would never do a local night dive. I only did my night dive and a dark cavern dive in crystal clear water where you could see as far as the light beam reached. I guess murky waters are good for testing your navigation skills but I dive to see stuff underwater.

Jaymeany
08-23-2007, 07:55
I love night diving. I always go in a familiar place and try to start at dusk. I like this because you have residual light but then it goes away. However, I going to start going at whatever time I can.

cgvmer
08-23-2007, 08:32
This is one of the dives I really want to do, but my sons (who are my normal buddies) don't want to ....so I need to work them up to it.

jeraldjcook
08-23-2007, 08:40
This is one of the dives I really want to do, but my sons (who are my normal buddies) don't want to ....so I need to work them up to it.

Like someone else mentioned, try starting the dive at dusk when there is still a bit of light out. Let your sons know that once the sun starts to go down they can thumb the dive if they get uncomfortable. Night dives are awesome.

Jaymeany
08-23-2007, 08:47
If you can descend near a large object so you can check the life at night. Everything is different at night.

CompuDude
08-23-2007, 11:53
I have done only one night dive as part of my AOW and I tell you it was scary as heck. It was in a quarry.

I definitely would never do a local night dive. I only did my night dive and a dark cavern dive in crystal clear water where you could see as far as the light beam reached. I guess murky waters are good for testing your navigation skills but I dive to see stuff underwater.
As long as you have 5' of vis, you're fine on a night dive (10' is nicer, I'll admit, but you really don't need much more than that). Few lights penetrate much farther than that anyway.

When you're night diving, you focus on the stuff within range of your light, so monster vis is a lot less important.

I LOVE night dives. In the ocean, at least. I've never felt any desire to dive in a lake or quarry... but then, I live near the ocean, so there's no need.

cummings66
08-23-2007, 14:58
I did my first night dive last night, it was fun and quite different. Yup, lots more fish, but sometimes it spooks you because with only a few feet of visibility they just jump out of nowhere at you.

I hit the bottom a couple times, something I've never done before because it was so dark and you just couldn't see where the bottom was until the much started flying. At least in daylight you can see it coming, but when everything is black it's tougher.

I did enjoy it, and I'll do it again even with crummy visibility in a cold water lake.

Jaymeany
08-23-2007, 15:04
If you do the night dive in a lake again. try to find a rock and get a crayfish out from under the rocks. sometimes the fish will eat out of your hand at night!

subsur
08-23-2007, 20:17
night diving is supposed to be fun, although i did not particularly enjoyed it when i did it as a part of my AOW (it was too cold). lots of animals come out at night, you can see fluorescent species. it's not that creepy as it may seem, actually.

NitroWill
08-23-2007, 20:20
Night dives are really amazing..
You can dive the same scene day/night and the creatures will be completely different..it's quite amazing..
To me, it is also very relaxing and my SAC seems to drop lower then normal..

You do have to have your buoyancy under control and be (extra) alert - but it is all in becoming a more experienced diver! Any chance I can do a night dive - youll find me there for sure!

greyzen
08-23-2007, 20:52
I am so doing a night dive 9/8... *I think :D* and I'm beyond excited...
it's something i've always wanted to do, and I love the feeling of looking in low light and feeling like I'm flying :)

chewyjr15
08-23-2007, 21:52
i cant wait for night dives

cummings66
08-23-2007, 21:57
I put it off for a long time, fear of the unknown I guess. I'm not the type to rush into something and I wanted to have my act together. It was anti-climatic in many ways.

brandon
08-23-2007, 22:29
Night dives are great! Twilight dives are good too...

Always fun to see what kind of critters are working the night shift.

-B.

CharlieSierra
08-24-2007, 02:36
I've only made one. I had a few things go wrong but can still say it was an awesome experience. Here's some pointers to help make your experience better:

1. Have a regular dive buddy with you. It's more relaxing to know who you're diving with. I didn't heed this advice and it made things a little challenging.
2. Have some way of identifying one another. Should have asked the question of the operator prior to making the dive, but I assumed they had glow sticks or beacons, etc. As a result, I was a dark spot in the water - very difficult for dive buddy or DM to see/find. Also, my buddy had a beacon and was very easy for the entire group to locate and join up with for both under water and floating on the surface. I'm sure the boat captain appreciated it too.
3. Consider leaving the camera behind. This is a personal choice. Later you may wish you'd taken the camera, but after my first night dive I wished I'd spent more time observing things than fiddling with taking pictures of the few things I focused on. In case you haven't gotten the idea from all the previous posts - it's pretty cool down there at night.
4. Relax & breathe. Well isn't that what you're supposed to do always?? Don't let your pre-dive anxiety blow all your air. Remember to relax and get your breathing rate down to get the most out of what I'm sure will be one of your most memorable dives ever.

Look forward to seeing your post after your first night dive ;)

Vercingetorix
08-24-2007, 12:17
2. Have some way of identifying one another. Should have asked the question of the operator prior to making the dive, but I assumed they had glow sticks or beacons, etc. As a result, I was a dark spot in the water - very difficult for dive buddy or DM to see/find. Also, my buddy had a beacon and was very easy for the entire group to locate and join up with for both under water and floating on the surface. I'm sure the boat captain appreciated it too.Uh...why would somebody else be responsible for your lights? I'm not being a wiseguy here; not trying to be a d*ck.

You have three lights: Primary, secondary, tank (hanging off of first stage). I'll hang a red Glo-Toob on the front on my BC so that other divers know "It's Rick", not just some guy with a primary light.

CompuDude
08-24-2007, 14:13
2. Have some way of identifying one another. Should have asked the question of the operator prior to making the dive, but I assumed they had glow sticks or beacons, etc. As a result, I was a dark spot in the water - very difficult for dive buddy or DM to see/find. Also, my buddy had a beacon and was very easy for the entire group to locate and join up with for both under water and floating on the surface. I'm sure the boat captain appreciated it too.Uh...why would somebody else be responsible for your lights? I'm not being a wiseguy here; not trying to be a d*ck.

You have three lights: Primary, secondary, tank (hanging off of first stage). I'll hang a red Glo-Toob on the front on my BC so that other divers know "It's Rick", not just some guy with a primary light.

Just FYI, red penetrates least well underwater. I'd get white, blue or green. I prefer green... seems less intrusive, and there's not a huge difference in distance penetration among the three.

Vercingetorix
08-24-2007, 14:17
Just FYI, red penetrates least well underwater. Yep, the reason I chose it for the front of my rig. From a distance, divers can see my primary light. Once they get close, they can see the red Glo-Toob to identify me.

pnevai
08-24-2007, 23:55
When you look into the abyss the Abyss looks into you!

Muhahahahaha!

CompuDude
08-25-2007, 01:54
Just FYI, red penetrates least well underwater. Yep, the reason I chose it for the front of my rig. From a distance, divers can see my primary light. Once they get close, they can see the red Glo-Toob to identify me.

So how do they tell it's you from behind? :smiley2:

Splitlip
08-25-2007, 05:53
2. Have some way of identifying one another. Should have asked the question of the operator prior to making the dive, but I assumed they had glow sticks or beacons, etc. As a result, I was a dark spot in the water - very difficult for dive buddy or DM to see/find. Also, my buddy had a beacon and was very easy for the entire group to locate and join up with for both under water and floating on the surface. I'm sure the boat captain appreciated it too.Uh...why would somebody else be responsible for your lights? I'm not being a wiseguy here; not trying to be a d*ck.

You have three lights: Primary, secondary, tank (hanging off of first stage). I'll hang a red Glo-Toob on the front on my BC so that other divers know "It's Rick", not just some guy with a primary light.
Some ops DO provide glow sticks for the patrons which they attach to the valve/1st stage. Often of a particular color while the guides have another color.

scubafreak
09-03-2007, 17:22
Night dives are WAAAAAAAAAAY more fun than day dives. Try it when there is a full moon and don't use a light. You become so in tune with your surroundings.

Kidder
09-03-2007, 19:00
NIght dives are awesome. I've done many at Table rock. The catfish all come out. You see sleeping fish, Large crawdads, and other cool stuff. It is very peaceful.

Subaqua
09-09-2007, 08:54
I just finished my AOW with a night dive. I was so nervous before and I thought I would not be able to do it. But once I started the descent, I was so amazed that I really enjoyed it. It's so quiet and peaceful, you can see more fishes and they come very close. Your eyes get used to the obscurity and I even turned off my light for a few seconds. What surprised me even more, is that my air consumption was better than usual. For sure, that won't be my last night dive! Everyone should at least try it once.