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ScubaToys Larry
04-01-2008, 13:50
http://www.scubatoys.com/store/tanks/pics/XSScuba_LP_Tanks.jpgThe Low Pressure 85 Steel Tank Has a Hot-dip galvanized exterior finish and offer a "plus" Rating for 10% overfill to 2640 PSI. The Low Pressure 85 Steel Tank comes with a standard "Yoke Style" Thermo PRO valve.

Designed in 2004 by XS Scuba, these hot-dip galvanized Low Pressure Steel Tanks are manufactured in North America by Worthington Cylinders. The Worthington Cylinders Corp. is already the world's largest supplier of industrial steel cylinders, and has is becoming the market (more..) (http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=LP_85_Steel_Tank)

More... (http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=LP_85_Steel_Tank)

rongoodman
04-01-2008, 13:55
Nice tanks. I'm 5'8", 150 lb and they trim out for me nicely. They're also not too heavy to carry around doubled.

wolfen42
04-01-2008, 14:37
Sorry if this is an ignorant question. But is the advantage of these tanks over the high pressure tanks that you get your 80 cu or whatever at a lower pressure instead of needing to go to 3400 to get 80 cu like the worthington high pressure tanks??

CompuDude
04-01-2008, 16:19
Sorry if this is an ignorant question. But is the advantage of these tanks over the high pressure tanks that you get your 80 cu or whatever at a lower pressure instead of needing to go to 3400 to get 80 cu like the worthington high pressure tanks??

They're smaller.

LP85 roughly equals HP100, in size. Same PSI = roughly same amount of gas, in each.

LP95 roughly equals HP119 in size. Same PSI = roughly same amount of gas, in each.

Fill pressure for LP tanks is 2640 psi. Fill pressure for most HP tanks is 3442.

If you live in Florida and can get overfills easy, LP tanks are great. Otherwise, if your local shops won't overfill tanks (outside of Florida, few do), I don't see the point to limiting your gas but carrying all that weight.

Personally, since overfills are not easy to come by, I'd rather carry a smaller HP100 underfilled to 3300 psi than carry a monster LP95 that's filled to exactly 2640. Similar amount of gas, but a LOT less weight to lug around.

I can't think of any LP tanks that are the equivalent of an HP80. I don't know many divers (except really short ones, and some small women) who trim out well in HP80s. For most men of average+ height, they're way too weight high on your back, so they make you head-heavy.

LP85s and HP100s trim out great for nearly everyone, by comparison.

These XS Scuba tanks ARE Worthingtons, btw. XS is one of the two distributors of Worthington in the U.S.

RoyN
04-01-2008, 16:47
Must....get.....steel....tanks....!!!! Must....save....money!!!!!

Grin
04-02-2008, 07:55
Those LP 85s are sweet. I have a couple of them. I get them filled to about 3200 PSI, so that's about 100 cf. The 85s are the same diameter as a AL 80 (7.25). The next size up(LP 95s) goes to the larger diameter tank. They have great bouyancy characteristics( only about 1 lb less than my HP 120s). They are cheap compared to HP tanks. They are small and not to terribly heavy to lug around.
The HP 100 is the better choice if: You have a extra $100+ for each tank you buy. And if you can easily get fills to 3500-3600 PSI at your shop, without hassling them every time you go to pick them up.

With the LP tanks you might find them filled to 3600 occassionally as they occassionally mistaken them for HP 100s. They almost always will overfill them LPs 3000 without even asking. I just ask for 3200, as that get same to the 100+cf mark and makes me happy. But even a correct fill gets you 85 cf, which is what you paid for, so you don't feel bad.

It royally sucks to turn the valve on one of your $350 HP 100s, right before your dive, and see 3200 PSI. Meaning you paid $350 for 100cf and you got 90. With LP tanks it usually the opposite of that scenario. Worst case, you get what your suppossed too(2650 psi).

It's very possible for you to have a $350 HP100 and get a 90cf fill, and me to be sitting beside you with a $225 LP85 and have a 115 cf fill.

All that aside, I would prefer HP 100s over LP85s. But the decision compounds as if I'm paying $350 for each HP100, I'm going to go the next step and get HP 120s for another $25-$40 more. So now two HP 120 tanks cost close to $800 vs the two LP 85s which is about $450. So all of the sudden you see a major difference. There is alot to the tank debate that needs to be figured out for yourself.

skdvr
04-02-2008, 09:53
My advice is to buy the tanks for the capacity that you need or want. If you want 85cf then buy the LP 85's and if you end up a little overfilled then you get a bonus.

This is the reason that I went with HP tanks. When I get my tanks filled I check them and if they are not full then I ask them to top them off, and I have never had anyone refuse to top off the tank. There are times when I am getting a HOT fill and I really do not care if the tank is completely full because I do not want to take the time to wait for the tank to cool off before topping it off. That is something that can be an issue with a HP tank, but in my case I dive HP 130's and 120's and most of my friends are on 80's and 100's so if my tanks end up a little short then I still have more air then them and my SAC rate is better than most of them as well.

Just my .02

Phil

CompuDude
04-02-2008, 12:27
Those LP 85s are sweet. I have a couple of them. I get them filled to about 3200 PSI, so that's about 100 cf. The 85s are the same diameter as a AL 80 (7.25). The next size up(LP 95s) goes to the larger diameter tank. They have great bouyancy characteristics( only about 1 lb less than my HP 120s). They are cheap compared to HP tanks. They are small and not to terribly heavy to lug around.
The HP 100 is the better choice if: You have a extra $100+ for each tank you buy. And if you can easily get fills to 3500-3600 PSI at your shop, without hassling them every time you go to pick them up.

Comparing HP100s and LP85s, the weight is nearly identical. And the price used to be $100 different, but now it's more like $35 different. $310 (http://scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=LP_85_Steel_Tank) vs. $345 (http://scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?product_id=X7100).


It royally sucks to turn the valve on one of your $350 HP 100s, right before your dive, and see 3200 PSI. Meaning you paid $350 for 100cf and you got 90. With LP tanks it usually the opposite of that scenario. Worst case, you get what your suppossed too(2650 psi).

It's very possible for you to have a $350 HP100 and get a 90cf fill, and me to be sitting beside you with a $225 LP85 and have a 115 cf fill.

1) I'd rather underfill an HP tank than regularly overfill an LP tank.

2) Your prices are way off... see above. LP tank prices have gone up a LOT.

3) The tanks are essentially the same (LP85 is slightly bigger, actually, since it's an inch taller), but the difference is you can ask for someone to fill you HP tank all the way up, while you're limited to the few people willing to break the rules and overfill your LP tanks. I can count on haranguing someone into a proper fill... I CAN'T count on finding someone willing to break the rules.

Skdvr's point is valid. If you're doing dives than NEED 100cf, buy a tank that gives you 100cf without having to hope for an overfill. (Floridians can ignore this bit.) Otherwise, I have better odds at getting more gas in an HP tank filled most of the way up than I do of getting lucky with an overfill in an LP tank.

cummings66
04-02-2008, 12:49
Florida seems to be a state of mind more than anything else. I'm in the camp of get the tank for the volume it's rated at and don't count on overfills.