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Splitlip
04-07-2008, 10:50
In this photo the diver is in the classic "unicycle" riding posture. I am guessing he is severly over weighted. When one over weights, the BC must be over inflated causing the diver to be picked up like a puppet. He will have to flail his hands to try and maintain some semblance of a horizontal position to fin. In many cases the fins will drag the bottom.

Black-Gorrilla
04-07-2008, 10:54
too bad it's blurry. but i know the exact position, seen it a hundred times in the keys. they move their arms like wings to maneuver.

mentalmarine
04-07-2008, 11:00
Ya a little blurry, but I can see the position you are talking about.

terrillja
04-07-2008, 11:03
Looks like his buddy was too busy laughting to hold the camera steady

mwhities
04-07-2008, 11:13
Hey! That's me! WTH??!!!

EDIT: Ok, kidding. Although, my first dives were like that. :| Didn't get to good of instructions on how to dive properly.

Michael

Splitlip
04-07-2008, 11:26
too bad it's blurry. but i know the exact position, seen it a hundred times in the keys. they move their arms like wings to maneuver.

I tell the story when I was diving around the breakers off Palm Beach. A boat motored over us and dropped about a dozen divers all in this posture. I was guessing they were students doing their 1st ocean dives. Presumably the instructors wanted them over weighted to help make skills checks easier on the bottom.

When they came down in the group i was reminded of the deal at the circus where the clowns are all riding every which way on their unicyles honking their noses:smiley36:.

Hopefully with time the skills will improve. Save our reefs.

divergirl
04-07-2008, 12:24
When they came down in the group i was reminded of the deal at the circus where the clowns are all riding every which way on their unicyles honking their noses:smiley36:.

hahahha very nice visual there

John Yaskowich
04-07-2008, 12:36
And it looks like neither his octo nor guages are secured. If he ever does get into the correct position he is going to drag those things through the sand. My instructor emphasized clipping stuff to help with streamlining and knowing where things are in an emergency.

Chad
04-07-2008, 14:00
I have dove w/people like that. It's hilarious until they start kicking my mask off or worse, kicking the reef. I understand when they are new and learning but sadly I have seen people that are relatively experienced that still dive like they are dog paddling.

ianr33
04-07-2008, 14:58
I was reeling in the line exiting Vortex spring after my very first cave dive when a diver much like the one in the photo dropped like a rock,feet first,onto the line where he started a wild dance in an attempt to stay upright.

While I was wondering what to do about this my instructor did a barracuda imitation,darted over to the dancing diver, pushed him out of the way then motioned me to continue. Pretty funny !

If you are going to stand on my line at least have the decency to stand still:smiley36:

frogman159
04-07-2008, 18:26
now I know what to look out for

Soonerwink
04-07-2008, 21:11
I was with a diver last weekend at Oronogo, and he had that classic position and he was stirring up a large cloud on the bottom. I told him we were going to start calling him rototiller. I never thought to ask him how much weight he was carrying.

Black-Gorrilla
04-07-2008, 21:31
and his octo and gauge are on the same side??


side question here: everyone mentions the loose stuff dragging in the sand and all that... how close to the sand are you guys swimming? i stay some distance off of the bottom myself, so that i can actually see stuff other than dragging on the bottom (and no, i dont have any thing loose... clips on everything)

Splitlip
04-07-2008, 21:45
and his octo and gauge are on the same side??


side question here: everyone mentions the loose stuff dragging in the sand and all that... how close to the sand are you guys swimming? i stay some distance off of the bottom myself, so that i can actually see stuff other than dragging on the bottom (and no, i dont have any thing loose... clips on everything)

I will normally drift high enough to peak under the ledge while drifting. A couple of feet. Sometimes on top of the ledge peaking over I get pretty close, not to the sand but rather the reef.
I am happy to say with a little bit of conentration on my breathing, I can hover 6" to a foot off the bottom. Works well with my HOG configuration. Hoses tucked, necklace, guages on wrists and SPG clipped off to the left hip.

I recently set my daughter up with my SS1 alternate on her reg. I configured her gauges across the chest so I could read them. I used her regs this weekend to check them out. Put a longer hose on my wing to accomodate the SSI and wore the guages across my chest on my zippy home made retractor. Doing my hovering drills, I had a hell of a time keeping the SS1 off the bottom. I finally tucked the inflator hose behind the HP hose.

If I was configed like the guy in the pic, my gauges would be dragging.

Edit: Now if you are cave diving you can understand how important it is to keep everything high and tight. That community has contributed to a lot of protocals now being adopted by open water divers. A lot more important in a confined overhead environment. As you said an easy couch potato or superman dive you can stay clear of the bottom and enjoy the show.

CompuDude
04-07-2008, 23:26
and his octo and gauge are on the same side??


side question here: everyone mentions the loose stuff dragging in the sand and all that... how close to the sand are you guys swimming? i stay some distance off of the bottom myself, so that i can actually see stuff other than dragging on the bottom (and no, i dont have any thing loose... clips on everything)

I'm usually within a foot or two of the bottom. Otherwise I miss the stuff I'm looking for.

<--- Macro photographer.

Black-Gorrilla
04-08-2008, 01:16
i have all my stuff clipped up and out of the way, gauge on left hip, 2nd on necklace, compass on wrist...

i understand that sometimes you gotta be in there.. i love being upside down looking under a rock or something like that... but during the dive i'm a few feet off the bottom, so that i can see whats actually there.

cummings66
04-08-2008, 07:07
I've been on many dives where if you were more than a foot off the bottom it'd be a blue water dive, except more black...

I am usually 1 to 3 feet off the bottom. You can be close and not silt it up if you want.

Chad
04-08-2008, 09:23
If I am looking at coral heads on a sandy bottom I am usually about a foot off the bottom. Otherwise I can't see under the ledges.

Zenagirl
04-08-2008, 11:35
We did a 3-tank charter once with a woman who did the unicycle the entire time. After every dive we would talk about the amazing critters we were finding/seeing. She never said a word until the end of the charter when she remarked that she didn't know what all the fuss was about since she barely saw anything. <LOL>

Oh yeah, I forgot that during the first dive she did something her Suunto didn't like, so she had to stay 15' above us for the second dive. So while we were all at like 65' with our noses in the coral and lava rock, she was at 45-50' in the mid-water column peddling above us. The boat crew took pity on her for the 3rd dive and we went to a site with a max depth of 35' where our DM had her dive upcurrent so she didn't silt the rest of us out. ;)

cummings66
04-08-2008, 12:42
I've dove with those buddies who stir up silt do to bad form, etc. There is one good thing about it though, if you lose them you can follow the silt trail and at the end of it is your buddy.

FyVe
04-08-2008, 13:46
I've dove with those buddies who stir up silt do to bad form, etc. There is one good thing about it though, if you lose them you can follow the silt trail and at the end of it is your buddy.

and the light shines at the end of the tunnel. way to make a positive out of a negative :)

obrules15
04-08-2008, 14:03
We did a 3-tank charter once with a woman who did the unicycle the entire time. After every dive we would talk about the amazing critters we were finding/seeing. She never said a word until the end of the charter when she remarked that she didn't know what all the fuss was about since she barely saw anything. <LOL>

Oh yeah, I forgot that during the first dive she did something her Suunto didn't like, so she had to stay 15' above us for the second dive. So while we were all at like 65' with our noses in the coral and lava rock, she was at 45-50' in the mid-water column peddling above us. The boat crew took pity on her for the 3rd dive and we went to a site with a max depth of 35' where our DM had her dive upcurrent so she didn't silt the rest of us out. ;)

The most frustrating dive with one of THOSE people was when my buddy and I were bringing up the rear and this guy, who needed to be in front of us so we could keep an eye on him, kept kicking coral and silting up everything. Then when the divemaster told him he was overweighted he REFUSED to change his weights. The fun part was that then my buddy and I took over. When we got done with him he gracefully lowered his weights and on his next dive he was not nearly so bad. To me, the crime is not to be a bad diver, it is not to listen to better divers when they are giving good advice.

scubasavvy
04-08-2008, 16:02
In this photo the diver is in the classic "unicycle" riding posture. I am guessing he is severly over weighted. When one over weights, the BC must be over inflated causing the diver to be picked up like a puppet. He will have to flail his hands to try and maintain some semblance of a horizontal position to fin. In many cases the fins will drag the bottom.

It looks like something from a horror film.

EuphoriaII
04-10-2008, 15:34
I hope thats not my next instabuddy

Gombessa
04-10-2008, 15:50
You think that's overweighted? Check this out:


http://www.mariposaderojo.com/SOULRIDER/Pics/coming.jpg

From Drysuit (shell) and weight. - ScubaBoard (http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/exposure-suits/216177-drysuit-shell-weight.html)

Splitlip
04-10-2008, 16:27
Is that real? Or somebody goofing?

cummings66
04-10-2008, 16:29
I did that in my dry suit once to see what it felt like, I hated that feeling, of course I had to hold on to the platform to stay down, but it was awful.

Gombessa
04-10-2008, 16:33
It's real - new drysuit owner. I'm sure it's not uncommon, especially for those just learning to use the suit only for buoyancy.

Sounder
04-10-2008, 16:55
I enjoy diving close to the ground, poking my head between corals (in the tropics), swimming into cracks and backing out. Good finning is key, and the back-kick is my favorite kick. There's nothing like kicking in to look at something, and then putting yourself in reverse and kicking backwards to get away from it without having to touch anything.

mobeeno
04-12-2008, 19:26
:smilie39:
Looks like his buddy was too busy laughting to hold the camera steady