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GatorSoul
08-02-2007, 07:06
I am sure this has been commented on ad infinitium on other forum's and quite possibly here on Larry and Joe's shiny new place, nevertheless here is my training question.

Is there any difference between SSI's and PADI's Rescue diver/master diver certs?

I have all of my prior c-cards from PADI. However, in the town I now live in, there is only one shop and it is a SSI endorsed training shop. I thought that switching things up might be a good way to go. Also, I understand that for the most part, it is not the program as much as the instructor who makes the training different.

I have all the neccessary c-cards except the Rescue-Emergency First Responder (PADI) / Stress Management and Rescue (SSI) to qualify as a Master Diver.

Should I stay close to home and go to a SSI shop or should I stick with PADI and drive a little?

mwhities
08-02-2007, 08:15
IAlso, I understand that for the most part, it is not the program as much as the instructor who makes the training different.

I feel that you've answered your own question.

That's what I look for in training. I careless about the card or agency. (Only when needed is the only time I care about the card.)

Michael

BSea
08-02-2007, 08:32
IAlso, I understand that for the most part, it is not the program as much as the instructor who makes the training different.

I feel that you've answered your own question.

That's what I look for in training. I careless about the card or agency. (Only when needed is the only time I care about the card.)

Michael

I agree. I've got SSI OW & AOW, but I took a PADI specialty course years ago. I think they were all top classes because of the instructors involved.

Wolfie2012
08-02-2007, 09:21
IAlso, I understand that for the most part, it is not the program as much as the instructor who makes the training different.

I feel that you've answered your own question.

That's what I look for in training. I careless about the card or agency. (Only when needed is the only time I care about the card.)

Michael

Yep, agree with that!

DPJ
08-02-2007, 18:36
The courses are very much the same. They are really interchangeable. If you are comfortable with the instructor, take the class. One interesting point about SSI, is that Stress Management and Rescue, can be taken prior to having an advanced certification.

CompuDude
08-02-2007, 20:15
SSI is an odd duck. There are few really innovative things about the way they've chopped up the PADI curriculum, and a few things about them that I really dislike.

Overall, however, as the others have pointed out, the fundamentals aren't going to change. You will learn a lot from a good instructor at either. So I'd check out this SSI shop, and see how you feel about the instructors. If you had a better vibe from the PADI instructors, it may be worth the drive to stick with PADI.

picxie
08-03-2007, 03:03
The courses are very much the same. They are really interchangeable. If you are comfortable with the instructor, take the class. One interesting point about SSI, is that Stress Management and Rescue, can be taken prior to having an advanced certification.

I did my stress and rescue course (SSI) straight after Open Water.

I don't even think there were any OW dives - it may have just been theory and possibly in a pool. If that's not kosher I wouldn't be surprised - the same outfit signed me off as an OW diver with only 4 dives (should have been 5 I believe).

CompuDude
08-03-2007, 10:38
SSI splits the info from the PADI course into two different classes, which offers some more flexibility. Changes things a bit, however, as you saw.

porsche060
08-12-2007, 11:15
I prefer NAUI over Padi. But its def the instructor..

plot
08-12-2007, 21:32
The courses are very much the same. They are really interchangeable. If you are comfortable with the instructor, take the class. One interesting point about SSI, is that Stress Management and Rescue, can be taken prior to having an advanced certification.

My SSI OW manual actually recommends taking Stress and Rescue immediatly after OW. There's very little diving actually involved with the course (one dive or two dives maybe? one to rescue a diver and possibly one to do search patterns... can't remember exactly)


Both agencies have really relaxed standards so they both suck equally. I mean, they're both equally awesome! ...or something.

It's up to the instructor to go above and beyond those set standards which alot of times depends on your classmates. If some of them simply arn't very good divers, you'll find the class is pretty simple. If the instructor feels he has a group of top notch students that he can push... you'll find that the class becomes alot tougher and you learn alot more. This is especially true for the rescue diver courses.

plot
08-12-2007, 21:35
The courses are very much the same. They are really interchangeable. If you are comfortable with the instructor, take the class. One interesting point about SSI, is that Stress Management and Rescue, can be taken prior to having an advanced certification.

I did my stress and rescue course (SSI) straight after Open Water.

I don't even think there were any OW dives - it may have just been theory and possibly in a pool. If that's not kosher I wouldn't be surprised - the same outfit signed me off as an OW diver with only 4 dives (should have been 5 I believe).

they count snorkeling as your first dive

badfrog88
08-13-2007, 07:33
I would double check the SSI requirements for Master Diver. If they are the same as PADI (unless PADI has changed) the specialties have to be with the agency you get the Master Diver cert from. I don't think SSI will "honor" your PADI specialties for their Master Diver course, etc.

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, and I hope I am.

comet24
08-13-2007, 07:43
What do you think of the staff at the SSI shop. If you like them then go that route. My OW was SSI about 15 years ago. Didn't take another class for over 10 years. The shop I took my AOW at was PADI. Went up through DM with them because they had a great staff that I liked. The instructor makes the training not the other way around.

porsche060
08-13-2007, 14:07
Go with the instructor than the cert. It's not like it's NAUI :-)

fisherdvm
03-19-2008, 14:36
I've read both the SSI OW and the PADI OW books. I am PADI certified, and my son is SSI.

My objection to SSI's OW book, it is disorganized. PADI is well outlined, and the expectation is very clear: 20 scuba skills must be mastered, and the 20 must be demonstrated. The critical skills are broken down into numbered steps - 5 steps of ascent, and 5 steps of descent.

The CW/OW requirements are the same, with one exception. Only PADI and YMCA require the students to learn and demonstrate breathing from a free flow regulator. SSI does not.

How do I know this? My son was not taught that skill, and I asked the instructor why. Of the 5 family members that were trained in SSI ow, only 2 were taught this skill. 3 were never exposed to it in theory or practical training.

With cold water diving in Michigan, without the ability to breath from a free flowing regulator, you shouldn't even dive in cold water. That is my opinion.

I hope SSI will correct this deficit. The skill takes 30 seconds to demonstrate, and 60 seconds to complete. Just because NAUI, SDI and other certifying agency do not require this skill, to me it is imperative. Just look at the 2 death we had in Gilboa about 1 year ago.... Perhaps they were not taught to breath from a free flow regulator??

fisherdvm
03-19-2008, 21:02
I would double check the SSI requirements for Master Diver. If they are the same as PADI (unless PADI has changed) the specialties have to be with the agency you get the Master Diver cert from. I don't think SSI will "honor" your PADI specialties for their Master Diver course, etc.

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, and I hope I am.

I think they will honor each other's specialty training. Everything is interchangeable (to a certain extent - as long as they are equivalent courses) until you reach divemaster.

They both want your money. I still can not fathom why someone would want to pay money for a card?

Folks say that PADI pushes cards to make money, so does SSI - perhaps more so. I think you can pay to get a new card every time you reach a certain milestone on your number of logged dives with SSI. SSI will let you buy a new card to show off your dive numbers (5, 12, 25, 50, 100, 150 etc...).

ScubaJoe
05-14-2008, 01:40
I am sure this has been commented on ad infinitium on other forum's and quite possibly here on Larry and Joe's shiny new place, nevertheless here is my training question.

Is there any difference between SSI's and PADI's Rescue diver/master diver certs?

I have all of my prior c-cards from PADI. However, in the town I now live in, there is only one shop and it is a SSI endorsed training shop. I thought that switching things up might be a good way to go. Also, I understand that for the most part, it is not the program as much as the instructor who makes the training different.

I have all the neccessary c-cards except the Rescue-Emergency First Responder (PADI) / Stress Management and Rescue (SSI) to qualify as a Master Diver.

Should I stay close to home and go to a SSI shop or should I stick with PADI and drive a little?You already said it... Instructor makes the difference, not the card...

BouzoukiJoe A.K.A. wrecker130 AKA Chuck Norris AKA joeforbroke (banned)
05-15-2008, 19:00
I'm wondering what the point of getting a master diver card is anyway? Is it an ego thing? Don't get me wrong, I think some of the specialty courses are worth doing. Just don't see the point of 'master diver'

Mtrewyn
05-15-2008, 20:30
I'm wondering what the point of getting a master diver card is anyway? Is it an ego thing? Don't get me wrong, I think some of the specialty courses are worth doing. Just don't see the point of 'master diver'

I agree with this, does it relay benefit you? or do you get more skills or training in the class? or is it just a card?

Now "Dive Master" that is a whole different story....

rumblefish
05-15-2008, 22:07
Just to throw me 2 cents into the ring. I think the main advice that people have been giving you in this thread is that you should really look at the instructor and not the agency when it comes to looking for training. This is the most important thing to consider when taking classes.

If you're looking to improve yourself as a diver, there are many ways you could go about doing it.

If you want to stay in the recreation diver space, look into the NAUI Master Diver program. It's a real class that involves roughly 7 lectures,8 dives minimum and a final exam. It covers most of the same topics in the NAUI divemaster program minus the dive leadership portion. Lots of good information in this class. Avoid the SSI/PADI master diver program as it's just a card saying you've completed 4 specialties, AOW, Rescue and 50 dives.

If you're interested in dive leadership, check out the divemaster/divecon programs. This is the first step that can eventually lead to becoming an instructor. Again, if you're interested in this path, look for the best instructor you can find and then do a crossover program if you want to teach through a different agency.

If you're interested in something more intensive then recreational diving, you could always try going into tech. Many agencies offer Intro to tech classes. It's a good way to see if tech diving is for you. Another class some people swear by is the GUE/DIR Fundies class.

Another different angle to consider may be cave diving, NACD offers cavern/cave diving certs. A good way to experience cave diving in a safe environment might be to try cenote diving in Mexico.

DAN classes are also another way to round out your training. Highly recommended. Look into their DES program.

And to top it off, you could always get more into the different specialties...photography, marine biology, wrecks, underwater archeology...

There's a lot of different ways to make yourself a better diver, it's just a matter of picking the path that best suits you.

BouzoukiJoe A.K.A. wrecker130 AKA Chuck Norris AKA joeforbroke (banned)
05-16-2008, 17:59
Good post, rumblefish!

huvrr
05-19-2008, 19:48
for me it is definitely about the qualities of the instructor. I would drive to dive where I enjoy the instructon more than anything.