PDA

View Full Version : Do you carry redundant air



frogman159
04-10-2008, 19:10
Just curious, Pony? what size? spare air?

texdiveguy
04-10-2008, 19:18
Recreational NDL diving I carry a 19cf pony slung when diving a single cylinder.

Recreational diving done in doubles, no pony bottle....redundant gas is provided via doubles configuration.

Technical diving (doubles) again redundant back gas is provided with gas management per the doubles configuration, I carry deco/stage bottles with required gas be it deco-travel gas and/or back gas all based on the dive profile.

NO Spare Airs allowed!!!!!

mentalmarine
04-10-2008, 19:27
Recreational NDL diving I carry a 19cf pony slung when diving a single cylinder.

Recreational diving done in doubles, no pony bottle....redundant gas is provided via doubles configuration.

Technical diving (doubles) again redundant back gas is provided with gas management per the doubles configuration, I carry deco/stage bottles with required gas be it deco-travel gas and/or back gas all based on the dive profile.

NO Spare Airs allowed!!!!!

My buddy hates it when I try to attach him to my single :)

Splitlip
04-10-2008, 19:30
No, but that will be my next purchase.
I "solo" too often.
I am looking for a pony. I have the regs.

edl
04-10-2008, 19:39
spare air, its better to have some air to at least gather your thoughts i would think that no matter how often you dive it would still be a surprise to all of a sudden not have any

Splitlip
04-10-2008, 19:42
:smilie40:. .

terrillja
04-10-2008, 19:48
30cf pony, my buddy and I both carry our own. I did enjoy it though when I saw a diver in Key Largo with Halcyon everything, all DIR rigged up, and then he strapped on the spare air. Priceless.

CompuDude
04-10-2008, 19:59
30cf pony, my buddy and I both carry our own. I did enjoy it though when I saw a diver in Key Largo with Halcyon everything, all DIR rigged up, and then he strapped on the spare air. Priceless.

That would have been a great picture. :smilie39:

scubasamurai
04-10-2008, 20:01
funny thing on my recent dives to key largo, lots of people carrying the spare air, mostly on the reef dives??? the wreck divers carried no spare or pony bottles.

myself i am looking at the 19cf bottles because again i am a single diver and really have a hard time trusting the instant buddy!!, been lucky so far

mentalmarine
04-10-2008, 20:04
just enough time in the spare air to truely realize you are jacked!

terrillja
04-10-2008, 20:08
30cf pony, my buddy and I both carry our own. I did enjoy it though when I saw a diver in Key Largo with Halcyon everything, all DIR rigged up, and then he strapped on the spare air. Priceless.

That would have been a great picture. :smilie39:
Yes, the one dive I forgot the camera...

DarinMartell
04-10-2008, 20:19
I bought the Spare Air a year ago for $190. I drank the KoolAid here and sold it on E-bay a couple of months ago for $183 and bought a 30cf from ST.

Same as a-lot of people I don't have a regular buddy so I wanted my own "buddy" so I do not have to trust an insta buddy.

awap
04-10-2008, 20:27
spare air, its better to have some air to at least gather your thoughts i would think that no matter how often you dive it would still be a surprise to all of a sudden not have any

The problem with the spare air is you go through almost the same expense and trouble that you would have with a pony and you still end up planning on doing an emergency swimming ascent with a limited number of breaths to help you. With a pony you would plan on conducting a normal slow ascent and include a normal rest stop. A spare air reduces the risk, but a pony pretty much eliminates the risk involved in dealing with an OOA/LOA.

For solo diving, I carry a pony unless the dive is simple and shallow. When diving with a buddy, I sometimes carry a pony and sometimes stake my claim on some of my buddy's gas, depending on the buddy and the dive plan.

texdiveguy
04-10-2008, 21:13
[QUOTE=edl;156131]s


For solo diving, I carry a pony unless the dive is simple and shallow. When diving with a buddy, I sometimes carry a pony and sometimes stake my claim on some of my buddy's gas, depending on the buddy and the dive plan.

I always relate this response to a biker....sometimes I wear and helmet and other times I want to feel the wind in my hair and don't wear the helmet.....buddy or no buddy **** happens, if one has a bottle then one should carry it regardless of the dives depth or doing a buddy dive or not...carrying it sets a strong practice of being very proactive in self survival.

Daved
04-10-2008, 21:19
Bought a quick draw bracket this year---made the 13 cf so easy--don't leave home with out it.

cummings66
04-10-2008, 21:21
I dive with doubles or use an AL40 as a pony. Lots of air, but it serves a double purpose. It's useful for a lot more than a pony.

I think that if you have it you should use it. Why drive a car without a spare tire? Someday you're going to get a flat no matter how careful you drive. Be prepared.

navyhmc
04-10-2008, 22:10
I sling a 19 cu ft pony. Now and again, I use it just to get the practice with it.

jbres1
04-10-2008, 22:30
I dive doubles for the most part, except on vacation. So I carry either an al 80 or a steel 98 on most local dives
On vacation I dive with a 19 for shallow dives, and a 30 for anything over 80 ft.. But now with the airlines charging for the extra suitcase I will be cutting back to just bringing the 19.
Jim Breslin

MSilvia
04-11-2008, 07:16
spare air, its better to have some air to at least gather your thoughts i would think that no matter how often you dive it would still be a surprise to all of a sudden not have any
I prefer to have enough air to gather my thoughts and then surface at a safe rate with a stop, so I carry a pony instead of a spare air when I want redundancy with a single tank. I don't have any interest in a "backup" that only carries enough gas to let me gather my thoughts before it runs out.

I often dive doubles with an isolator, and I sometimes do deco dives, so I got a 40cf bottle for that, and I find it works well as a pony too. I do have a 19cf tank I could use too, but that's usually just used to pressurize regs for the rinse tank.

I don't have a helicopter or kayak, so the only use I'd have for a spare air would be sticking it in the glove compartment of my truck in case the 'big dig' tunnel collapses.

skdvr
04-11-2008, 07:48
I cary an AL 40. I just do rec diving for right now but plan on moving into Tech diving down the road so I went ahead and purchased the AL 40. When my wife starts diving again I am going to get her a pony as well. I am just not sure yet if I want to get her a AL 40 so that I can use that one too when doing Deco, or if I want to get her own AL 19. I am sure I will probably get her a AL 19, but we will see what happens.

I have used a Spair Air before. It was while I was in the Marine Corps, and it was used for a bail out bottle if our Helo went into the drink. That is about all they are good for in my opinion, unless you are diving no deeper than about 20 ft.

Phil

ianr33
04-11-2008, 08:07
spare air, its better to have some air to at least gather your thoughts i would think that no matter how often you dive it would still be a surprise to all of a sudden not have any

Actually I disagree with that. IMHO all that spare air does is provide a false sense of security.

I have seen a diver happily soloing at 100 feet with a single 80 and a spare air.That was on a mixed Tech/Rec trip to Geyer Bank/Flower Gardens/Stetson
in the Gulf of Mexico. The shallowest point on Geyer Bank is 120 feet. Several "Rec" divers bought spare airs specially for that trip because it was so deep !! ??

awap
04-11-2008, 08:25
For solo diving, I carry a pony unless the dive is simple and shallow. When diving with a buddy, I sometimes carry a pony and sometimes stake my claim on some of my buddy's gas, depending on the buddy and the dive plan.

I always relate this response to a biker....sometimes I wear and helmet and other times I want to feel the wind in my hair and don't wear the helmet.....buddy or no buddy **** happens, if one has a bottle then one should carry it regardless of the dives depth or doing a buddy dive or not...carrying it sets a strong practice of being very proactive in self survival.

I prefer to tailor my gear for the specific dive. For increased bottom time I'll sling a 63. For shallow solo river dives I use a reg with just a primary. If shore is not readily accessible, I attach a snorkel and SMB to my BP. I see little sense in carrying gear I do not need for the planned dive including a pony. Proactive self survival is more a mental state than a gear/gadget thing.

frogman159
04-11-2008, 08:58
Just for the record I was not considering a spare air- can't get my head around 1.7cf:smilie39:

But I was thinking of getting a pony, just wasn't sure if it was commonplace to carry one

WD8CDH
04-11-2008, 09:05
I almost always dive with redundant air. What I use depends on the dive plan.

My most often used rig is triple 40's with two of them doubled with the third one independant. That gives me 80cf primary and 40 cf secondary.

The least redundant air that I will ever carry (unless I am just untangling line from a prop) is a 19cf pony. Same diameter as a 13 but only a little longer so very little more bulk.

mwhities
04-11-2008, 09:09
I have slung it yet but, I have an al40 that I will be using as a reserve and when I do my Adv Nitrox dives, I'll use it as deco. I plan to get another al40 and maybe two 80Ns for deco/reserves.

medic001918
04-11-2008, 23:37
I do most of my diving in doubles now (except on vacation), so I carry redundant air in the form of an isolator and two complete regulator set ups.

Shane

cummings66
04-12-2008, 08:55
two 80Ns for deco/reserves.

Any particular reason for the AL80N vs the more common AL80?

PS, I was told the AL80 is a good deco cylinder because you can get 40cf of O2 in it easily where the AL40 would need a fill to 3000 psi for 40cf and with O2 that's problematic.

captain
04-13-2008, 11:04
No, I don't I dive vintage most of the time.

Sounder
04-14-2008, 13:33
30cf pony, my buddy and I both carry our own. I did enjoy it though when I saw a diver in Key Largo with Halcyon everything, all DIR rigged up, and then he strapped on the spare air. Priceless.

That would have been a great picture. :smilie39:
Yes, the one dive I forgot the camera...

I would have paid VERY good money for that picture... priceless indeed.

2thdivr
04-14-2008, 15:32
It depends on the dive and objective, these are some guidelines, and 99% are solo

< 35' single 100 no octo
35-100 single 100 & pony or duals
100+ duals and stages

russp
04-14-2008, 16:10
Don't have redundant air yet but am planning on either a 3cf SpareAir or a 6cf Zeagle set up. Just something to get to the surface if I really screw up.

Sounder
04-14-2008, 16:21
Don't have redundant air yet but am planning on either a 3cf SpareAir or a 6cf Zeagle set up. Just something to get to the surface if I really screw up.

First, don't screw up. There is no excuse for running out of air.

Second, if you have an unexpected failure where you lose all your air, your buddy should be there to donate a regulator. Practicing OOA emergencies with your buddy is free, and is a FAR better option than having a Spare Air.

Gas Management link for everyone to read: Rock Bottom and Gas Management for Recreational Divers (http://www.scriptkiddie.org/diving/rockbottom.html)

terrillja
04-14-2008, 17:36
Don't have redundant air yet but am planning on either a 3cf SpareAir or a 6cf Zeagle set up. Just something to get to the surface if I really screw up.
6CF is NOTHING if you are panicked and deep. Throw in possibly entangled, and 6CF won't last long at all. IMO, 13 is the minimum for a pony, 19 is better, 30 is even better.

Just me, but I'd rather have too much air rather than not enough when it counts.

The key is to get a size you will always use though. If you have an 80cf pony but never carry it's it's no good, you're better to have a 19 that you always carry.

just my 2psi

frogman159
04-14-2008, 18:07
Another point a 19cf bottle is about $20 more than a 6. Not bad for 3 times the capacity. And a 30 is only about another $10

Sounder
04-14-2008, 18:16
...and a 30cf or 40cf bottle will serve you well down the road.

coyote
04-15-2008, 16:53
If I'm diving solo then always.

With dive buddies I follow these guidelines:
Any dive below 60'
Any dive planned to within 10 minutes of a NDL
Any overhead environment.

Usually I sling 40cf. A lot of people think it's excessive. But if I'm ever out of air then something has gone horribly, incredibly wrong. Things are completely FUBAR and I want every bit of time I can get to deal with whatever bizarre/crazy thing has happened, and then make a safe accent.

russp
04-15-2008, 17:22
I was just going towards the 3 cf SpareAir or the 6 cf Zeagle just because they mount easily and out of the way on a BCD. What's the largest tank that can mount to a BCD or to the main tank without causing balance problems? I don't want something that has to be slung under my arm.

cummings66
04-15-2008, 17:59
I can't speak now of balance problems because they all seem to balance for me when I sling them, but I suspect a new diver might find the weight on one side to be enough to cause problems.

I can say that I would consider a 13 cf cylinder as the smallest size I'd use. The 6 cf cylinder has barely enough gas in it to get you to the safety stop and let you do it, from 50 feet and assuming an average RMV rate from a newer diver. Forget it from deeper than 50, then I'd suggest a 13 cf.

The issue not one of how it fits your BC, but how it performs for your intended usage. Will it get you up and allow you to do a stop or must you ascend all the way? I prefer to do the stops myself, but they're not manditory all the time.

Carry what works. Test your RMV out next time you dive and then you'll know what size cylinder you need based on sound science.

terrillja
04-15-2008, 18:18
I was just going towards the 3 cf SpareAir or the 6 cf Zeagle just because they mount easily and out of the way on a BCD. What's the largest tank that can mount to a BCD or to the main tank without causing balance problems? I don't want something that has to be slung under my arm.
An AL 30 is a few inches shorter than an AL80, and about the same height as a HP80 steel. So if you have an 80, the 30 won't be any longer than it, making setup pretty easy.

Splitlip
04-15-2008, 18:30
I can't speak now of balance problems because they all seem to balance for me when I sling them, but I suspect a new diver might find the weight on one side to be enough to cause problems.

I can say that I would consider a 13 cf cylinder as the smallest size I'd use. The 6 cf cylinder has barely enough gas in it to get you to the safety stop and let you do it, from 50 feet and assuming an average RMV rate from a newer diver. Forget it from deeper than 50, then I'd suggest a 13 cf.

The issue not one of how it fits your BC, but how it performs for your intended usage. Will it get you up and allow you to do a stop or must you ascend all the way? I prefer to do the stops myself, but they're not manditory all the time.

Carry what works. Test your RMV out next time you dive and then you'll know what size cylinder you need based on sound science.

Can you sling a 13 comfortably? Or is it too short.

cummings66
04-15-2008, 19:43
I am not sure. But he didn't want to sling it so that's not an issue for him.

Splitlip
04-15-2008, 20:02
I was just wondering for myself. I had been planning on picking up a 19 and slinging it. I can get a pretty good deal on a used 13 which I would sling.

I won't "solo" below 80ft, so I know 13cf would fit my needs. I just don't know what issues I might encounter with the shorter length of a 13 and clipping off waist to shoulder.

awap
04-15-2008, 20:03
I am not sure. But he didn't want to sling it so that's not an issue for him.

But, the future tense of "didn't want to sling it" is "now I want to sling it".

BTW, I do have an ultimate pony mount I have no use for.

Splitlip
04-15-2008, 20:13
What is that? Cylinder mount?

awap
04-15-2008, 20:22
What is that? Cylinder mount?
Yes. Leisurepro has it as item AQEUPB - Ultimate Pony Bracket. It is a good solid mount. OK if your BC only has 1 tank strap. It uses its own strap which is too much of a PITA if your BC uses 2 straps already.

But If you have the D-rings on your BC to sling a pony, that is the cheaper, simpler, and more accessible solution.

Splitlip
04-15-2008, 20:39
So a 13 cf can be slung?
I use a BPW so I have the d-rings.

awap
04-15-2008, 20:46
So a 13 cf can be slung?
I use a BPW so I have the d-rings.

It slings quite nicely. A 13 can be a bit marginal on gas volume so, by slinging it, I can carry it pressurized, with the valve off, and turn it on if I need it or if the residual pressure starts to get low.

Splitlip
04-15-2008, 20:51
Great.
Thanks!

cummings66
04-16-2008, 07:27
It's good to know you can sling it. I prefer that method to any other method out there. Personally, it scares me to think of an entanglement hazzard sticking out on my back. The main cylinder is out there, then you attach this other gizmo on there which further extends the space you take up. I have got my tank valve tangled up before, I'd be willing to bet it's even easier to hang yourself up on a pony mounted on your cylinder.

Just speculation, but it's why I think slinging a cylinder is the sane choice. Not the only one though and I won't make a comment if you choose to mount it. I've said it before, I have a buddy who mounts his pony next to his main cylinder, it looks like a double except one of the cylinders didn't grow enough. That's probably the only method of attachment I'd consider safe. Not straight out.

russp
04-16-2008, 13:20
I guess being a new diver, I'm just looking for a safety factor if I have a problem and my insta-buddy has wondered off. I don't think my skills are up to extra gear hanging under my arm so I thought a smaller tank in a holster on the BCD seemed like a good comprimise between a larger pony and no redundant air at all.

RonC
04-16-2008, 16:25
I bought a Spare-Air back when they first came out. I surfaced from 90 ft. with it just to try it out. Better than nothin I guess. The air in your BC can buy you a few breaths in a real pickle. I had it to do over I'd get a nice doubles rig. I like the way they balance.

CompuDude
04-16-2008, 17:10
I guess being a new diver, I'm just looking for a safety factor if I have a problem and my insta-buddy has wondered off. I don't think my skills are up to extra gear hanging under my arm so I thought a smaller tank in a holster on the BCD seemed like a good comprimise between a larger pony and no redundant air at all.

If you do, get the larger (6cf) one you mentioned, and be sure to educate yourself about how useful they are and in what situations. If you keep your dives to 60', 6cf is of some use, albeit still limited.

Two of the most important scuba skills for any new diver to work on are (a) buoyancy, and (2) awareness of air consumption. (and not necessarily in that order)

Once you have (2) down reasonably well, you'll be at a much-reduced risk of getting yourself into an OOA situation, and probably won't feel the need to carry the 6cf bottle anymore.

cummings66
04-16-2008, 17:11
I don't think my skills are up to extra gear hanging under my arm so I thought a smaller tank in a holster on the BCD seemed like a good comprimise between a larger pony and no redundant air at all.

That's an idea, but to be frank, it won't take you much to get used to slinging a cylinder. It really isn't that hard to do and surprisingly isn't in the way like you might think, especially on that first dive with it.

russp
04-16-2008, 19:49
Once I get back in the water a few times this season, I'll see if I can rent or borrow a tank and sking (even without the reg) just to see how it feels.

Duckydiver
04-16-2008, 20:54
My .02 is to avoid spare air. I know that from expirience. Luckily I was able to sell mine so I could get a used reg for a pony set up. Spare air may have a place in diving, but if you find yourself debating between spair air and a pony, the pony should win. And if its money, Im only spending about 100 more than a 3cf spare air for a slung 30cf pony. Not to bad, at least I think.

divingbuddy
04-17-2008, 18:11
If I on a dive I feel that a redundant air source is needed, I use a set of double tanks. I have slung a pony bottle in the past (now I sling them as deco bottles :smiley20:) but prefer the stability and versatility of a double tank setup.

A 7 foot hose in the event of an OOA situation is an additional benefit of diving doubles (although a single tank diver can also use a long hose, I don't think I've ever seen a double tank diver with a short hose).

Just my two cents...Cheers!

RoyN
04-17-2008, 19:21
I'm thinking of getting a 30cf or 40cf pony tank. But since I'm not doing massive tech diving or going beyond recreational level, I probably won't need to get that urgently. I'll probably get it eventually though.

Trey9123
04-17-2008, 19:27
No, I usually dive pretty shallow and dont ever feel like i would need one.

CompuDude
04-17-2008, 19:34
A 7 foot hose in the event of an OOA situation is an additional benefit of diving doubles (although a single tank diver can also use a long hose, I don't think I've ever seen a double tank diver with a short hose).

I've seen one.

*twitch*

I'm almost over it.

cummings66
04-17-2008, 22:42
I don't know what some people consider deep, for me I'll say deep is 100 feet or deeper. However, I think I've seen more people run low or out of air at 50 or 60 feet than I have any place else. Many of them run out at the safety stop. Of course that one is a non issue for almost everybody, but running low at 50 feet means you've got more concerns and need to do things better.

I think that if you dive routinely 50 feet deep that it's not a bad idea to carry some spare air, if not for you then the buddy. You'd be surprised at how fast they suck your air down. I would never go smaller than a 13 cf cylinder, but personally I feel better with a larger cylinder based on what I've seen other dives do. I'm telling you, they suck air down at a rate that will make your SPG spin. Those that run out of air tend to be real hoovers.

skdvr
04-18-2008, 07:32
I think that if you dive routinely 50 feet deep that it's not a bad idea to carry some spare air, if not for you then the buddy. You'd be surprised at how fast they suck your air down. I would never go smaller than a 13 cf cylinder, but personally I feel better with a larger cylinder based on what I've seen other dives do. I'm telling you, they suck air down at a rate that will make your SPG spin. Those that run out of air tend to be real hoovers.

I agree, it just makes me feel better know that just in case someone goes OOA I should have plenty of extra air for them with my AL 40. I have never been in any kind of OOA situation but I am sure just as a normal human response to something out of the ordinary whom ever is OOA once they get they hands on some air, they are going to be sucking it down. I would rather a diver know that if they are OOA they can just turn to me rather than them shooting to the surface. Even at 20 or 30 feet they could really hurt themselves if they are not thinking clearly (again because of being OOA) and forget to blow some of the air in their lungs out on their way up. I make sure that anyoen that I dive with knows that if they should happen to go OOA all of a sudden and I do not know it, they can just rip the reg out of my mouth or just grab the one on the Pony if they see it...

Once I sling the bottle I pretty much do not even know it is there anymore, so I take it with me all the time.

Phil

LCF
04-18-2008, 21:44
If you are going to carry redundant gas, do the math to figure out how much you will need for the depths you typically dive and the gas consumption you have. Make sure whatever you are carrying is reasonable.

On deep dives, or dives when I don't know my buddies, I dive doubles and provide my own redundancy. For recreational dives where I know my buddies, my take spare gas down with me . . . It's on my buddy's back. And my buddy has MY back, because he knows I'm carrying HIS spare gas.

mobeeno
04-18-2008, 22:19
I don't carry redundant air although it is a good idea

aprilgoddess1987
04-18-2008, 22:22
i use a 13 cuff pony bottle, my husband uses a 40 cu slung under his arm, i joke around and call his a mule bottle

edl
04-19-2008, 12:00
Ive noticed a lot of spareair for sale on e-bay lately

frogman159
04-19-2008, 14:42
Ive noticed a lot of spareair for sale on e-bay lately

wonder why

ScaredSilly
04-20-2008, 21:15
I carry my wife on occasion, she is my redundant air. :D

Sounder
04-21-2008, 16:16
I can't post this enough!! Please read this VERY WORTHWHILE gas management model.

Rock Bottom and Gas Management for Recreational Divers (http://www.scriptkiddie.org/diving/rockbottom.html)

mitsuguy
05-29-2008, 22:20
I coulda bought any size pony, but when it came down to it, even a 40 cf pony isn't that much bigger (or cost that much more) than a 30 cf, and a 30 cf is not much bigger than a 19 cf bottle... so, why not just do the 40 cf...

rawalker
05-29-2008, 22:50
I carry redundant air for my dive buddy and he/she does the same for me.

sparky
05-29-2008, 23:48
When I do carry my pony, it's a 19 ft tank and I back mount it although I've recently given thought to make sling-able

TRACI
05-30-2008, 08:21
I just bought a 13 CF pony, took it to Coz over Memorial weekend, but never took it out of my suitcase, hope to try it out during some local diving in a few weeks.

charlesml3
06-04-2008, 13:02
Mine looks sorta like this except it's mounted on the right, not the left. Also, mine is a 13 cubit foot. I can carry it with me to Belize, Palau, Cozumel, etc without a lot of hassle on the airlines.

I mount it to my tank because I don't intend to hand it off. If someone else needs it, they're welcome but they just need to grip my BC while we head to the surface. Easy enough.



http://www.zeagle.com/clientuploads/Jim_Fox_Photos/accessories/Redundant_System/Redundant-System-Installed-.gif

RoyN
06-04-2008, 13:08
Nope, don't carry redundant air. But if I do, it probably will be slung pony in a AL30 tank.

david_57
06-04-2008, 19:15
I dive with a 40cuft pony slung under my left arm, comes in handy for a dive extender:smiley2:

diver-wife
06-09-2008, 19:12
I dive with a 40cuft pony slung under my left arm, comes in handy for a dive extender:smiley2:

:bash: come one you know better than that:smiley2:

caroln
06-09-2008, 20:17
Doubles on every dive at home. When travling and doing easy recreational dives, my redundant air is on my buddys back, so I stay within usable distance.

dive10killer
06-09-2008, 20:45
I carry a 19cf slung to my left side.

Lone Frogman
06-10-2008, 03:16
Just curious, Pony? what size? spare air?

I have a 13,19,30 and double 100's. What I dive with depends on each dive plan.

diver-wife
06-10-2008, 14:11
Just curious, Pony? what size? spare air?

I have a 13,19,30 and double 100's. What I dive with depends on each dive plan.
no need to brag:smiley2:

Lone Frogman
06-10-2008, 16:02
Just curious, Pony? what size? spare air?

I have a 13,19,30 and double 100's. What I dive with depends on each dive plan.
no need to brag:smiley2:

The question was "Do you carry redundant air ?" those are the tanks I use for redundancy. If I wanted to brag I would have listed all the tanks I own. Read my signature.

WD8CDH
06-10-2008, 16:12
My pony is usually 1/2 of the size of my main air supply. If I am diving double 40s (my favorite rig), my pony is a third 40. Only rarely will I use less than 1/3 of my total for redundant air and then only vary rarely will I use anything smaller than a 19 even though I have several smaller tanks.

cuestick
06-10-2008, 17:13
I don't yet but hopefully before long I can purchase one. In the middle of trying to buy all my required stuff first.

USF_Diver
06-10-2008, 19:20
I don't have a redundant air, but I wouldnt mind getting some just in case.

Sansho
06-15-2008, 18:50
Tank mounted 19.

longtailbda
06-15-2008, 21:09
If I were to use backup again it be a 19.

diver-wife
06-16-2008, 08:40
Just curious, Pony? what size? spare air?

I have a 13,19,30 and double 100's. What I dive with depends on each dive plan.
no need to brag:smiley2:

The question was "Do you carry redundant air ?" those are the tanks I use for redundancy. If I wanted to brag I would have listed all the tanks I own. Read my signature.
no need to get defensive, I was just joking with ya, ( you see the smiley)
:smiley31:

dive10killer
06-16-2008, 21:03
It has been a long while since I have seen anyone (besides myself) with a pony.

scootermcfly
06-17-2008, 12:03
Probably for next dive season I will be getting a 20cf(maybe 30) pony bottle with a button gauge and basic reg-I am looking at the Mares Rebel for the back up. I wont be doing deep dive until I take AOW in early August...I am also considering getting an O2 set up. Better to have it and not need it.