PDA

View Full Version : One Light Package per couple enough?



Cichlid
08-02-2007, 22:21
Is one primary light and one secondary enough between two people? Or should we each have a primary? Looking at the Princeton Tec LED package.

Wolfie2012
08-02-2007, 22:29
In my opinion you each should have a primary (and ideally a backup). I'd think about what would happen if you got seperated and one of you is left without a light.

Illini_Fan
08-02-2007, 22:33
When I was outfitting my son and I -- I went with a primary and secondary light for each of us individually. I wouldn't recommend sharing a light.

WaterRat
08-02-2007, 22:33
Yeah, each one needs a primary. It's always good that the dive team have equal power lights. This makes it easier to signal with the light. Whoever was diving the primary would wash out the backup light.

Ron

thesmoothdome
08-02-2007, 22:42
Each diver should have a primary light. Do they need to be equal strength? Probably not, but they should each should be bright enough to be considered a primary.

That said, during lobster season, we mainly used what most people would consider back up lights because we wanted our hands free. It worked for us, but I wouldn't recommend it for others.

Really, in a recreational OW environment, it comes down to comfort level. If you're comfortable with seeing less around you, then maybe a primary and a secondary light is good enough for a buddy team. In an overhead environment, definately not.

CompuDude
08-02-2007, 23:13
One primary AND one secondary each. At least, for night dives. If you're just looking for something to look under ledges with, you can get away with skimping for now.

thesmoothdome
08-02-2007, 23:18
One primary AND one secondary each. At least, for night dives. If you're just looking for something to look under ledges with, you can get away with skimping for now.

Hehe...between this and the Suunto issue, we may never dive together! :smiley15:

CompuDude
08-02-2007, 23:28
One primary AND one secondary each. At least, for night dives. If you're just looking for something to look under ledges with, you can get away with skimping for now.

Hehe...between this and the Suunto issue, we may never dive together! :smiley15:
Hey, I make the recommendations for safety reasons if someone asks, I'm not going to insist on it from a buddy, though... unless you're my S.O. And then it's definitely safety first!

I have a primary, secondary and tertiary light on my rig. That, plus the fact that my primary is a 21w HID can light, and I've got you covered if you want to knock out a night dive sometime. :D

thesmoothdome
08-02-2007, 23:51
One primary AND one secondary each. At least, for night dives. If you're just looking for something to look under ledges with, you can get away with skimping for now.

Hehe...between this and the Suunto issue, we may never dive together! :smiley15:
Hey, I make the recommendations for safety reasons if someone asks, I'm not going to insist on it from a buddy, though... unless you're my S.O. And then it's definitely safety first!

I have a primary, secondary and tertiary light on my rig. That, plus the fact that my primary is a 21w HID can light, and I've got you covered if you want to knock out a night dive sometime. :D

LOL...it's all good. If we dive during bug season, be ready for a pair of mini Q40s strapped to my mask. Other than than, I promise to bring my light cannon.

medic001918
08-03-2007, 07:00
I agree that each diver should have a primary and a backup, especially if you dive in low light conditions. I would recommend to new divers to get a couple dives in a well lit environment before trying to manage a light as well though. I've found baby steps to work well before adding any kind of task loading to them.

Shane

cummings66
08-03-2007, 07:07
Yup, a primary and secondary. I was at 110 feet and my primary went out, boy did it turn pitch black. The backup light saved the day, not to mention making it easy for me and my buddy to get out of there. If we waited long enough I am sure my eyes would have started seeing things again.

So I'm with the group that says primary and secondary, possibly two secondaries depending on the dive.

cogrwy
04-22-2008, 13:16
I vote for primary and secondary for each diver.

ChrisA
04-22-2008, 14:11
Is one primary light and one secondary enough between two people? Or should we each have a primary? Looking at the Princeton Tec LED package.

You absolutly each need your own primary and backup. When budies get seporated at night the best (and maybe only) way to find each other is with the light. You can't read a guage without a light. Lights are used for signaling as you can't see hand signs. I dive at night almost every week and at beat we have 15 feet of vis. Many times I'll lose a budy because I'm looking at some amimal or under a rock and what I do is simply turn out my light and look for a faint glow that is my budy's light. Even if the vis is good and your buddy is 5 feet to your left you can't see him unless you shine a light on him. I only know he is there because I see his light hitting the sand and can trace the beam backwards to his light. You will want a light and a backup and maybe a second backup.

If you have only one light (because you lost a budy) and it fails you are kind of in a bad way. You can practice what you would do. On any day dive in easy condidtions just close your eyes. with your eyes close can you figure out how to do a safe (1 foot per second) assent and can you find the shore so you can get out of the water? If you are going to dive with just one light it is best to pratice some drills with your eyes closed in daylight. You can do it.

I've actually seen a primary and TWO backup lights fail on the same dive. So it can happen. We had just my primary between us. I was actually laughing at us for having this one in a million chance happen. My buddy that night and I had done 100+ night dives at that site and had done many of those lights out drills so it was a non issue, we just continured on. Eventually he whacked his light and fixed the loose connection.

ChrisA
04-22-2008, 14:23
If we waited long enough I am sure my eyes would have started seeing things again.

No they don't. I've tried it. Even if there is moonlight or starlight at the surface. if you are deep the water acts as a filter. More then once I've turned out my light at depth and waited for my eyes to adapt. Some times here in So Cal at times when the vis is bad we have bio-lumenisent plankton. These microscopic animals will glow with a green light if the water is disturbed. so if you look up you see a long colum of glowing bubbles. If you move your hand you can make a trail of light in your hand's turbulent wake. But what is realy neat is when a fish swims fast. The fish seems coated with green lght. You can see a fish shape follwed by a fish wake. Looks just like a ghost. but you need dark adapted eyes and no lghts.

Sounder
04-23-2008, 14:29
+1 more for each diver having a primary and a back-up. One trick about deploying your back-up....

Turn your back-up light on BEFORE you unclip it from anything. In the dark, if you reach for your back up and deploy it before it's turned on, you'll NEVER find it if you drop it. If it's on, it's relatively easy to find.