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Largo
04-22-2008, 18:59
I have spoken to several Navy submariners who told me that, in order to qualify to serve on a submarine, a person must be able to ascend from 100 feet on one breath of air. They have a tower full of water, for the purpose.

Are there any submariners out there who can describe the experience?

Babster
04-22-2008, 21:06
I'm sure it would something along the lines of:

Oh f....................................k!!!!!!!!! *fading into the distance towards the surface*

terrillja
04-22-2008, 21:29
SEALS use a 50' tower:
YouTube - SEALs BUD/s Training, 2 of 4 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KZuA7o1NIY)
See 1:20

BuzzGA
04-23-2008, 00:12
I got to spend a day on the USS Tucson and got to thinking as the depth readout hit 700 that if there were a problem...all that good ESA training in my OW course would be pretty useless...100 maybe but then again getting all those guys out through the couple of hatches in a hurry seems like a tall order

frogman159
04-23-2008, 07:58
I got to spend a day on the USS Tucson and got to thinking as the depth readout hit 700 that if there were a problem

That'd be a pretty deep breath

MicahEW
04-23-2008, 08:55
I would try that it sounds rough but still worth a try.

DUnder
04-23-2008, 10:23
My father went through sub school at Groton CT in the mid 1950's. He said they had to do that. From what I remember. He said what they did was take a deep breath and Blow and go. In other words swim like h**l to the surface. He said most every one made it. I do belive they did have safty divers in the tower in case someone had trouble.

reactive
04-23-2008, 11:16
There was a show on the history channel about this not too long ago. I don't remember the name, but you may wanna keep an eye out for sub training.

CompuDude
04-23-2008, 13:04
It's not nearly as bad as you'd think. Big breath, blow and go, just like stated above. I've only done a CESA from 60' (back when they let you do that during training), and it was really odd to actually feel the air expanding in your lungs, but it was a non-event otherwise.

Largo
04-23-2008, 19:58
I hate to post things without info to back it up, but I remember reading about a real Navy sub that had some kind of mechanical failure and settled at about 100 feet. They had to evacuate, and swam up, all of them.

Talk about guts!

Doghouse
04-24-2008, 07:00
Hmmm Risk of death vs death... Flock it I am going for it!

Largo
04-24-2008, 08:47
Where do they do submarine school? Sandy Eggo, CA?

It would be a hoot to visit there and get to do the ESA.

mikeamenti
04-07-2012, 11:23
I am a submariner, Ill write something nice about our fun little trainer and post back for you.


I have spoken to several Navy submariners who told me that, in order to qualify to serve on a submarine, a person must be able to ascend from 100 feet on one breath of air. They have a tower full of water, for the purpose.

Are there any submariners out there who can describe the experience?

navyhmc
04-07-2012, 12:45
Where do they do submarine school? Sandy Eggo, CA?

It would be a hoot to visit there and get to do the ESA.

Bubble heads are born at Groton, CT.

Zeagle Eagle
04-07-2012, 14:05
Did a free ascent from 70' at Blue Springs in Deland, FL. It's no big deal. I just lazily drifted up.

mcr0112
04-07-2012, 18:28
WE did emergencey ascents back in the early 70's during training and once in a while when your j valve had been tripped "accidently" and you ran really low on air. Oh for the good old days?

Largo
04-08-2012, 12:13
Wow, this is an old thread. I'd almost forgotten posting it.

If anyone is wondering, I opted for the escape pods.
They cost more up-front, but having them lowers your workers' comp premiums.

mikeamenti
04-09-2012, 18:13
Well its pretty straight forward. Lets say your submarine is FUBAR, get in your escape suit climb in the escape trunk pump suit full of air, open door rocket to the surface. (there is more than that but its the simplest way I can put it). Of course I cant to in to too many specifics...****skies may be looking...

BUT youtube has some good videos....and yes it was hella fun!

Escaping from a Submarine: A Trial Run - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wd2Plax5HhI)

Zeagle Eagle
04-09-2012, 18:41
Thanks Mike, that vid was awesome. I sure hope they have an over-pressure valve on those suits.

mikeamenti
04-09-2012, 18:52
O they do, once you plug in to fill it with air the over-pressure valve immediately starts venting.

fun fact, once at the surface the suit turns in to a raft with exposure protection.

God Bless America and Submarines (our submarines at least!)

navyhmc
04-09-2012, 20:14
Hooyah! An e-ticket ride at Disneyland. (not a bubble head, but I got to take the ride.)

And remember: Airedales have crashed more planes into the ocean that bubbleheads have crashed subs into the sky!

Largo
04-10-2012, 17:52
Why doesn't the Navy use PT boats anymore?

navyhmc
04-10-2012, 18:11
Because PT Boots are cheaper....

Largo
04-10-2012, 18:14
Because PT Boots are cheaper....

What's a PT boot?

Is that something like Leather Personnel Carriers?

navyhmc
04-10-2012, 18:26
Exactly! The boats were nice, but a pain to PT when you were land locked so we traded them for boots. everyone except the old cheifs were happy... But then again, the old chief's favorite movie line is: "We keep you alive to serve this ship, so row well!" (Ben Hur)

Largo
04-10-2012, 18:28
I wonder if a person could purchase an old PT boat. They were made of wood, right?

navyhmc
04-10-2012, 21:25
I would imagine you could if you can find one...there are in very short supply. most of them never made the trip back to the states after WW2. since they were made of plywood, their service life was pretty short and were considered expendable to begin with. There are maybe 20 still around and most of those are museum displays.

CWSWine
04-10-2012, 21:46
They can escape from as deep as 600 feet!!!

I watched the Navy Seal training on Discovery a while back, gave me a new respect for Seals.

Largo
04-10-2012, 22:08
...their service life was pretty short and were considered expendable to begin with.

They were expendable?

Hmm. That would be a great title for a movie about PT boats.

navyhmc
04-11-2012, 01:31
They were expendable?

Hmm. That would be a great title for a movie about PT boats.

Yeah, but to make it, we'd need John Wayne, Robert Montgomery, Donna Reed, a cast of thousands, Maybe MTB 'ron 3..... Heyyyy Wait a minute.....

scubadiver888
04-11-2012, 07:42
They can escape from as deep as 600 feet!!!

I watched the Navy Seal training on Discovery a while back, gave me a new respect for Seals.

Knowing how physically fit you have to be a Navy Seal it does not surprise me they can surface from 600 feet on a breathe.

My first experience with scuba diving was a Discover Scuba in the Dominican Republic while a hurricane was passing 100 miles off shore. The pool dive was free and the ocean dive was $35. They were going to cancel the ocean dive but everyone said, "No ocean dive, no $35." So they went ahead with the dive.

My group was 8 people to one dive guide. We were insufficiently trained (I know this now as I'm a DSD Leader). Surges in the water were throwing us around 10 to 15 feet; I got smashed against rocks on the bottom a few times. I had equipment failure at 40 feet. Sucked in water. Very little air in my lungs, water in my throat and mouth. I took a moment to find the dive guide. I tried to get his attention by waving my arms but he was just on the edge of visibility and chasing two people getting swept out to sea. Took a couple more seconds to think about my options. Didn't know I could spit out the water into my regulator and breath in air. I did know if I was on the surface I could cough up the water and breath in air. So I swam for the surface. Remembered old Jacques Couteau movies and about getting bent so I swam up really slow. Swam as slow as I felt comfortable, i.e. not feeling out of breathe. Got to the surface without trouble. I was 70 pounds overweight and in poor health.

If you think about my health, exhaling then taking in water, taking my time to get the dive guide's attention and swimming slowly to the surface it was actually quite easy to save myself from 40 feet. Having lost all the weight and passed the Divemaster tests I am confident I could swim up from 140 feet on one breathe. At 1 foot per second that is 2 minutes 20 seconds. If you are in average shape you should be able to hold your breathe for 3 minutes.

So if I can do it from 140 feet I can see a Navy Seal doing it from 600 feet.

Zeagle Eagle
04-11-2012, 21:33
scubadiver888, the point is not to hold your breath. You breathe out all the way. It's easy.

scubadiver888
04-11-2012, 22:35
scubadiver888, the point is not to hold your breath. You breathe out all the way. It's easy.

Sorry, I didn't mean holding your breathe as you ascend. I meant one breathe had enough oxygen in it for 3 minutes. You have to breathe out as the air expands or you'd have trouble.

waytooslow
04-12-2012, 11:00
scubadiver888, the point is not to hold your breath. You breathe out all the way. It's easy.

I hated it from 20 feet - could not imagine 100-600 ft.

scubadiver888
04-12-2012, 11:03
I hated it from 20 feet - could not imagine 100-600 ft.

It's funny. I HAD to do it during my first ever dive (Discover Scuba Diving) and it was fine. I did it for my Open Water certification and I found it a lot harder to do.

Largo
08-01-2012, 20:07
OMG! They Were Expendable is on TCM tonight at 10 pm, EST!