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cmburch
04-24-2008, 15:59
**missing Diver** - Spearboard Spearfishing Community (http://spearboard.com/showthread.php?t=59696)

mobeeno
04-27-2008, 14:02
**missing Diver** - Spearboard Spearfishing Community (http://spearboard.com/showthread.php?t=59696)
Did he get tangled, blacked out or the fish pulled him?

Splitlip
04-27-2008, 14:34
I had seen that story and watched in unfold.

I have a lot of respect for blue water hunters and free divers. But hypoxia(shallow water blackout), is real and frequent danger.

Somebody developed a device that some how senses if a diver blacks out and inflates to bring him or her up.

ratown
04-27-2008, 14:37
It sounds like he blacked out. He had seven pounds of weight on him so he probably just sank afterwords. I had a freediver buddy tell me you are supposed to be positively buoyant so when you black out someone can see you on the surface and help. That really sucks.

mobeeno
04-27-2008, 14:54
Okay, I though of adding a couple more pounds for freediving so that I could go down effortlessly. But now I have changed my mind. I would just have kick abit to go down.

ratown
04-27-2008, 14:59
How deep do shallow water black outs happen? Isn't this where you are supposed to be buoyant?

cmburch
04-27-2008, 21:04
Okay, I though of adding a couple more pounds for freediving so that I could go down effortlessly. But now I have changed my mind. I would just have kick abit to go down.

How about starting a new thread for amount of weight to use freediving. You may need some additional weight if you are Ab diving 25-35 feet and having problems (missing Abs due to fighting buoyancy).

cmburch
04-27-2008, 21:12
From reading the thread about the 17 year old young man, he probably had a SWB near the surface and his brother saw him near the surface and jumped in as he started sink. He was not wearing any wetsuit with the 7lbs of weight according to the thread. He sank too fast for his brother to get him and his brother lost sight of him. This is very sad.

cmburch
04-27-2008, 21:19
How deep do shallow water black outs happen? Isn't this where you are supposed to be buoyant?


Maybe start a new thread on SWB? I am neutrally buoyant at 25 to 30 feet depending on my working depth. At 20 feet or less I will tend to float up. Also in an emergency situation - as long as I am conscious and not tangled or stuck underwater - I release my weight belt and will shoot to the surface. Hopefully my buddy will be able to help me.

ratown
04-27-2008, 21:36
Wikipedia says it happens in 5 meters...
Shallow water blackout - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shallow_water_blackout)

This has good info:
Shallow Water Blackout (http://www.scuba-doc.com/latenthypoxia.html)

DiverMAN
04-27-2008, 21:44
very good info ratown...

DaneMeyer20
05-22-2008, 13:58
sounds terrible, that would be rough for the brother

Chad
05-22-2008, 16:30
Very sad deal. IMO 7lbs is a ton of weight for free diving if he wasn't wearing a wetsuit. I only use 2lbs.

elijahb
05-23-2008, 14:34
without a wetsuit I would not use any weight for freediving

cmburch
06-15-2008, 19:17
news: Anaheim Hills man drowns off Catalina | - OCRegister.com

Condolences to family and friends.

doczerothree
06-15-2008, 19:23
I really hate hearing about stuff like this. MY deepest condolences to the family.

Hantmcg
06-19-2008, 07:15
SWB occurs between 5 - 10m, why you always get a buddy to come down and meet you at 10m. Deep water blackout is pretty rare apparently

cmburch
08-12-2008, 20:36
The death on Saturday at Stillwater Cove, Sonoma, California of Craig Alan Belluomini made me think about safety when freediving in Kelp.

It seems that his leg knife/sheath became entangled in Kelp and he drowned a few feet from the surface.

Link to rescuers post:
Diver drowns, kelp seen as culprit... - ScubaBoard - Scuba Diving Forums and Social Network (http://www.scubaboard.com/forums/norcal/247698-diver-drowns-kelp-seen-culprit.html)

Link to Freediving in Kelp Safety
Free Diving in Kelp (http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=22351)

hooligan
08-12-2008, 21:31
Man, I can only imagine what it would be like having your hands above the water but not being able to get to the surface.... Scary.

wgt
08-13-2008, 07:27
How deep do shallow water black outs happen? Isn't this where you are supposed to be buoyant?

There are often considered to be two forms of shallow water blackout.

Type I involves metabolism of oxygen at depth, with a loss of oxygen pressure during ascent according to Dalton's law. When the arterial oxygen pressure drops below a critical value during ascent, the blackout occurs (typically as the surface is approached). For example, if arterial pressure of oxygen is 76 mmHg at 10 meters of seawater, then it will be 38 mmHg as the surface is approached and the total pressure is halved. An arterial pressure of oxygen of 38 mmHg is often insufficient to support consciousness.

Type II is commonly associated with the forcible shedding of carbon dioxide through hyperventilation followed by a swim with the face submerged (descent not required). If oxygen pressures drop rapidly through metabolism while carbon dioxide concentrations rise slowly (delaying the urge to breathe), unconsciousness can result.

maxmironov
08-30-2008, 12:29
"shallow water black out" is pretty pretty scary stuff

cmburch
11-10-2008, 20:00
Abalone Diver Missing
Tino on SpearBoard posted this morning.

Abalone diver missing near Fort Ross | PressDemocrat.com | The Press Democrat | Santa Rosa, CA (http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/20081110/NEWS/811100400/1316/LIFESTYLE12?Title=Abalone_diver_missing_near_Fort_ Ross)

Reading this for some reason greatly saddens me.

Rest in Peace Jonathan Su. Sincerest Condolences to family and friends.

I have always worried about what would happen when I am freediving with my 2 buddies. What would I do? How long would it take before I noticed that they did not surface? How would I search a 30 foot area that I am guessing where they are in because that was were I saw them last go down.

Since the NorCal Picasso Open, I have been trying to adhere to the "One Up, One Down" when I am with a buddy or buddies. But when your buddy disappears and swims between the kelp along the seafloor, one can only guess. Which direction? How far? How deep? Has it been a long time by glancing at my watch?

I hope they find you soon Jonathan.

James1010
11-10-2008, 20:09
Anyone in that area to go and give a hand? Sad story to hear and how often does black outs happen and what are the safety measures for it? I was hoping to get into it and thought the dangers where minimal. But I was wrong.

Splitlip
11-10-2008, 21:03
Happens all to often.

Somebody out ther invented an inflatable belt with a sensor that can detect by movement (or lack there off) that the diver has suffered SWB.

Don't know of anyone who uses the device.

cmburch
11-11-2008, 10:08
These deaths are probably not due to SWB.

Many may be medically related such as heart disease, essentially old age.

Some are due to entanglement.

Some may be due to inexperience.

Some may be due to diving beyond one's capabilities.

Some may be due to what has been coined "Sacramento Syndrome".
I think this is essentially, "I drove all this way to get some Abalone and I am not going home empty handed."

I normally Ab dive solo the past few years. If I get a day off in the middle of the week; I check the NOAA buoy for conditions. If good, I throw my gear in the back of my truck and head on over. If too rough when I get there, I will go in a protected cove. If too rough in the protected coves, break out the board or fishing pole or go for a hike.

Some may not know when to call it a day and the conditions change sometimes pretty quickly. The swells could have been less than 5 foot in the morning when entering the water and gotten to over 10 feet while diving.

There were some rescues. Mainly small boats and an overturned kayak. Hit the cold water without proper exposure gear and it may be hard to right your Yak or sit-on-top because of your cold muscles. And once your body tightens up, it can be easier to tip again in the rough conditions.

Know Your Limits!

No Misses
11-11-2008, 13:15
Happens all to often.

Somebody out ther invented an inflatable belt with a sensor that can detect by movement (or lack there off) that the diver has suffered SWB.

Don't know of anyone who uses the device.

Dr. Terry Maas has developed the freedivers vest. Here is a pic of him with the vest at the 2007 Blue Wild Spearfishing Expo.
http://www.mobilescuba.com/eTM&FRV.JPG

For those that do not know; Terry Maas is a veteran freediver. He started diving when he was 14 years old and has been freediving steadily for the last 43 years. In his early years, Terry won the individual U.S. National Spearfishing championships 4 times. His team won 10 championships. In 1982, Terry’s interests turned to blue water hunting. For the next 10 years he captured 3 world records for spearing yellowfin and bluefin tuna. His 398-lb Pacific bluefin tuna record still stands. In 1995, Terry published his first book, BlueWater Hunting and Freediving. This book is richly illustrated with pictures and stories from Mexico. Several years later he published his second book on the subject of freediving, Freedive.
I copied this info from his bio Sea Watch | Advisory Board (http://www.seawatch.org/about_us/advisory_board.php)

BTW: The 2009 Blue wild Fishing Expo will be held Feb 6, 7,&8 in Dania Beach, FL. The Blue Wild Spearfishing Seminar and Expo (http://thebluewild.com/index.html)

No Misses
11-11-2008, 13:22
SWB does not give you any warning. I have read accounts from freedivers who have felt that they may have exceeded their limits. Upon starting thier ascent, they loosen the buckle of their weight belt and hold it in their hand. The theory is that if they suffer a SWB they have a chance of being revived at the surface, instead of sinking into the abyss.

This sounds like a viable choice when freediving. IMHO

cmburch
11-19-2008, 11:41
Jonathan was recovered with his weight belt on and no indication of entanglement.

Body of abalone hunter is recovered off Sonoma County coast - Los Angeles Times (http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/california/la-me-abalone19-2008nov19,0,4193340.story)

Be safe. Know your limits. Even with a buddy you may be diving solo if bad Vis.

The Vis is pretty good now and a flat ocean.
Salt Point Park Ocean Conditions Home Page (http://saltpointoceanconditions.com/)

Freediving in Kelp Safely
Free Diving in Kelp (http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=22351)

emt
02-05-2009, 18:02
Thanks, I try to let all the kids of my house know the risks vs. benefits of diving/freediving.