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r1cook
04-27-2008, 10:11
Who's done it?:smiley20:

r1cook
04-27-2008, 10:13
My dad and I are planning to do some diving specifically in the north shore in lake Huron. Just wondering if any one has any tips or suggestions. anything about gear or locations.

texdiveguy
04-27-2008, 11:00
http://www.tobermoryscuba.com/

Lots of great diving done in Huron......tons of info. on the internet for charters and sites. Let us know how it goes....one of these years I would love to hit Tobermory myself!

r1cook
04-27-2008, 13:51
hey thanx 4 the site

r1cook
04-27-2008, 14:24
http://www.tobermoryscuba.com/

Lots of great diving done in Huron......tons of info. on the internet for charters and sites. Let us know how it goes....one of these years I would love to hit Tobermory myself!

You ever dive around manitoulin or the spanish river

BusDiver
07-14-2008, 20:21
I know this is an old thread but Tobermory is amazing diving. My buddy and I are going to head up on Saturday for a quick shore diving adventure. We will spend about 10 hours in the car for 10 hours of diving. Worth every second.

Sasha_K
07-15-2008, 17:37
Tobemory is very well known for ship wrecks. Ontario Underwaters Explorers club is going up there on Aug 2,3,4 - the cost is $70 per day.

I'm thinking of going, but may actualy go on a business trip then :-(

Sasha_K
07-15-2008, 17:38
O ya, and I did my first 4 OW dives in the great lakes too :-)

Please see my thread here for the list of clubs and stores

http://forum.scubatoys.com/canada/13981-toronto-gta-area-scuba-clubs-shops.html

mselizann
07-15-2008, 17:56
I shore dive Lake Erie a couple times a week

Formerly 45yroldNewbie
07-15-2008, 18:16
I dove last year and am again this year in Lake Michigan. Was surprisingly clear, 30-45' or so.

Huron is pretty cold all the time isn't it?

MSELIZANN:

How is Erie?

Webfeet
09-03-2008, 18:27
are you braggin or complaining?

Penetang - Georgian Bay - Huron - unbelievable. Big vis, nice topside too. Now is the time for the best surface water temps. Cold at depth and lots of wrecks. Try a 2 day live aboard.

Lake Erie - great dives for all abilities, Try the Dean Richmond for a challenge. On a good day the Dean will come into view about halfway down the mooring line (tied to its screw) to it's 110 depth. It will lay out below you upside down showing its hull. Cold (again) and air goes fast moving around this wreck. Watch for the treble hooks. The Cribs are off of Lawrence Park - a good shore dive. depth at 20 - 30 feet. Park at the LP boat launch and swim out w/ your buddy, float and a big innertube. Lots of fishing poles, anchors... use the innertube to haul your finds back to shore. Pick a nice flat day and the swim will be no sweat. Stop at Ricardo's on East Lake Rd. and have some spags on the way home.

Have fun

texdiveguy
09-03-2008, 18:41
are you braggin or complaining?

Penetang - Georgian Bay - Huron - unbelievable. Big vis, nice topside too. Now is the time for the best surface water temps. Cold at depth and lots of wrecks. Try a 2 day live aboard.

Lake Erie - great dives for all abilities, Try the Dean Richmond for a challenge. On a good day the Dean will come into view about halfway down the mooring line (tied to its screw) to it's 110 depth. It will lay out below you upside down showing its hull. Cold (again) and air goes fast moving around this wreck. Watch for the treble hooks. The Cribs are off of Lawrence Park - a good shore dive. depth at 20 - 30 feet. Park at the LP boat launch and swim out w/ your buddy, float and a big innertube. Lots of fishing poles, anchors... use the innertube to haul your finds back to shore. Pick a nice flat day and the swim will be no sweat. Stop at Ricardo's on East Lake Rd. and have some spags on the way home.

Have fun


Are not the Indiana and SK Martin in that 'general' area of the Richmond if memory serves me correct ..... have you visited these sites??

scubadiver888
09-03-2008, 18:50
I just started diving at home, i.e. Lake Ontario. Did 7 dives over the long weekend. Beautiful weekend for diving. Was still 45F in some areas but shore diving was 71F Saturday night.

texdiveguy
09-03-2008, 20:02
I just started diving at home, i.e. Lake Ontario. Did 7 dives over the long weekend. Beautiful weekend for diving. Was still 45F in some areas but shore diving was 71F Saturday night.

That's not really bad temps at all for the north country!! I saw 48f in an Oklahoma lake just a few weeks back. Have fun.

Webfeet
09-04-2008, 12:29
if you are in 71 degree water in any one of the Great Lakes - its called SWIMMING - not diving. New divers are always lulled by surface temps. They are really irrelevent. Even in August at 30 ft you will be past a couple of thermoclines. Anything past that will always be bone chilling cold. I have tried to tell newbies to 'wear everything you have' and the ones that listen buy a dry suit the next week anyway. Thats how I came to dive dry.

To Texdiveguy: yes I have been on the Dean, the Martin and the Indiana (we call it the stone wreck) many times. The Dean is my favorite.

texdiveguy
09-04-2008, 13:42
To Texdiveguy: yes I have been on the Dean, the Martin and the Indiana (we call it the stone wreck) many times. The Dean is my favorite.

What in your opinion sets the Dean as your favorite of these local sites? Is it it's combo of deepish and turtled condition . :)

Webfeet
09-04-2008, 15:08
Yes, plus the visibility is usually excellent. I have seen it push 60 plus. Overall its a real challenge. I like that. It feels deeper than 110. It demands real planning and discipline to be done safely. Its a big wreck and I usually don't get around it in one dive (something for next time). It will come into view about halfway down on descent - an impressive site

I did my grad work at Gannon in the early 80's when Dave Frew and Dave Stone started writing about the eastern basin wrecks. I had Frew for many classes (he taught in the Bus. school) They regularlly held evening presentations with slide shows on the various wrecks. Loran coordinates (this was before GPS) were being circulated for years prior among serious divers - traded like currency. At the lectures we found that we had been on many already. I moved away in 1990 but still go back in the summer and dive often. No shortage of boats or wrecks in Erie. One summer we dove almost every weekend looking for a revolutuonary war wreck that went down 4 miles off of Presque Isle loaded with weapons. I thought if I could just find one sword...

lots of fun

texdiveguy
09-04-2008, 19:22
Yes, plus the visibility is usually excellent. I have seen it push 60 plus. Overall its a real challenge. I like that. It feels deeper than 110. It demands real planning and discipline to be done safely. Its a big wreck and I usually don't get around it in one dive (something for next time). It will come into view about halfway down on descent - an impressive site

I did my grad work at Gannon in the early 80's when Dave Frew and Dave Stone started writing about the eastern basin wrecks. I had Frew for many classes (he taught in the Bus. school) They regularlly held evening presentations with slide shows on the various wrecks. Loran coordinates (this was before GPS) were being circulated for years prior among serious divers - traded like currency. At the lectures we found that we had been on many already. I moved away in 1990 but still go back in the summer and dive often. No shortage of boats or wrecks in Erie. One summer we dove almost every weekend looking for a revolutuonary war wreck that went down 4 miles off of Presque Isle loaded with weapons. I thought if I could just find one sword...

lots of fun

Wreck diving and in particular those of The Lakes are some of the worlds finest. Keep up the diving and ENJOY!!!!

scubadiver888
09-06-2008, 19:16
if you are in 71 degree water in any one of the Great Lakes - its called SWIMMING - not diving. New divers are always lulled by surface temps. They are really irrelevent. Even in August at 30 ft you will be past a couple of thermoclines. Anything past that will always be bone chilling cold. I have tried to tell newbies to 'wear everything you have' and the ones that listen buy a dry suit the next week anyway. Thats how I came to dive dry.

Actually, my shore dive was 43' deep. We went in just down the shore from where the dive boat was anchored. The guy who owned the site had dredged the harbour so it dropped away fairly quickly.

I was just talking to some guys who dove the Arabia in Tobermory. Tobermory in general is really cold. The Arabia is at 106'. They said it was only 51F this past weekend. Tobermory is north of Lake Ontario and it was 45F at 100' in Lake Ontario.

Temperatures around my area seem to be totally out of whack lately.

Webfeet
09-07-2008, 15:17
Methinks they jest with thou.

It would be very atypical. When I dove Arabia (over a Labor Day weekend in the late 90's) it never got over 40 (at depth). I have also dove Penetang several times and ditto for the 100 footers there. Incidentaly, I am also an ice diver. You are in a great spot for great diving but it is serious stuff. Here a clip on the Arabia:


Inexperienced diver dies exploring 'Arabia' wreck

Powered by CDNN - CYBER DIVER News Network

TOBERMORY, Ontario (23 June 2003) -- A relatively inexperienced scuba diver has died exploring the wreck of the Arabia off Tobermory.
A post-mortem Sunday found that David Clarke, 57, of Thames Centre east of London died Friday when his lungs filled with fluid internally.
The unusual condition, known as pulmonary oedema of submersion, has been increasingly attracting attention within the diving community, coroner Dr. George Harpur said Sunday afternoon.
"It's a phenomenon in which you can acutely develop a problem with too much fluid in your lungs, not from drowning but from inside the body, kind of an internal form of drowning," he said.
Clarke, a certified diver for just two years, his son and several others were diving from the charter boat The Lark in Fathom Five National Marine Park on Friday.
He was a fit and active man who had made fewer than 30 dives since certification. He was in 110 feet of water at about 6 p.m. when he ran into trouble breathing, Harpur said.
"He wasn't a terribly experienced diver, but he had been on dives of at least 90 feet in these waters. This was deeper than he'd been before, but he had been in this kind of water."
Clarke abandoned his breathing equipment as if it were not working, then discarded a second device given to him by his diving buddy. There were no obvious signs of life when he was brought to the surface.
Paramedics were called and arrived at the dive ship on a marine park vessel. Clarke was taken ashore, where he was later pronounced dead by the coroner.
"While he may have been panicked for a short while, (Clarke) died very quickly," said Harpur, a former military diver and an expert in diving medicine. "He died of lack of oxygen as a consequence of fluid on the lungs."
Both discarded breathing units still had an adequate air supply, although an investigation will look at if they malfunctioned, possibly because of the extremely cold water, Harpur said.

Harpur said until the investigation is complete, it's too soon to circulate information within the diving community which might help avoid similar deaths.
He said it's unlikely an inquest will be necessary.
"Most of the factors are already recognized and fairly well known," Harpur said. "There were factors involved that we have already circulated . . . like not making your first dive of the season to 33 metres and making sure that when you do dive to that kind of depth, that you've acquired adequate experience before you get there."
The depth of the water probably played at least a psychological role, although the condition which caused the man's lungs to fill with fluid is not related to deep water.
"It's not related to depth at all, it's related just to being submersed in water. It's related to the fact that it's cold and it's related to the fact that you're a male over the age of 45," said Harpur, a master diving instructor and medical advisor to several diving associations.
Clarke's was the third diving death in Ontario this year, the first in Tobermory. It was also the second recreational diving death. The other was on a commercial diving site.
Divers make about 25,000 to 30,000 dives each year at Fathom Five National Park, about half the annual total of several years ago, Harpur said. He did not know what percentage make deep dives, but said the Arabia is "a very popular site."
Two divers died last year near Tobermory. Novice diver Scott Jamieson, 33, of Kitchener died almost exactly a year ago. His body was found on the deck of the wreck of the Forest City.
Michel Guerin, 42, of Pickering died in mid-May while diving off Lighthouse Point in Fathom Five Park.

scubadiver888
09-08-2008, 07:59
Methinks they jest with thou.

It would be very atypical. When I dove Arabia (over a Labor Day weekend in the late 90's) it never got over 40 (at depth). I have also dove Penetang several times and ditto for the 100 footers there. Incidentaly, I am also an ice diver. You are in a great spot for great diving but it is serious stuff.

He didn't sound like he was joking. Maybe he was just narc'd. :smiley2: Mind you, my shore dive at 71F is really warm for Picton/Kingston. Most the guys with 1000+ dives said they never see it go about 65F in the place I dove. Seems like it might just be a warmer summer.

As for deaths on the Arabia, I think I've read about 11 of them. Most of them have been people who weren't in the best of shape and really diving beyond their personal limits. I'm in no rush to dive the Arabia. I'm still working on buoyancy and better air consumption.

gilboadiver
09-09-2008, 08:38
Osprey Charters out of Barcelona NY. is the best wreck diving outfit on the southern shore of Lake Erie, Most of the wrecks are in very good condition due to the cold water temps. And all of the ones they dive are fairly deep, with the shallowest being at 90 feet. Google Osprey Charters, they have a great web site

gilboadiver
09-10-2008, 15:06
are you braggin or complaining?

Penetang - Georgian Bay - Huron - unbelievable. Big vis, nice topside too. Now is the time for the best surface water temps. Cold at depth and lots of wrecks. Try a 2 day live aboard.

Lake Erie - great dives for all abilities, Try the Dean Richmond for a challenge. On a good day the Dean will come into view about halfway down the mooring line (tied to its screw) to it's 110 depth. It will lay out below you upside down showing its hull. Cold (again) and air goes fast moving around this wreck. Watch for the treble hooks. The Cribs are off of Lawrence Park - a good shore dive. depth at 20 - 30 feet. Park at the LP boat launch and swim out w/ your buddy, float and a big innertube. Lots of fishing poles, anchors... use the innertube to haul your finds back to shore. Pick a nice flat day and the swim will be no sweat. Stop at Ricardo's on East Lake Rd. and have some spags on the way home.

Have fun
brother where are you from ? . Ricardos is about 2 min. from my work, If you do the cribbs again this season let us know, would love to join you if we can

Webfeet
09-12-2008, 19:15
I'll bet you work at GE. I moved away from Erie in '90; now live in NC. Still have a place in Erie and get back often. Found alot of stuff around the cribs over the years. Usually dive it off a boat though. Next time we (wife and daughter dive as well) plan on diving Erie I let you know.

Good post on Osprey charters, have you dove with them? I checked out their website - impressive.

The guy who once owned Ricardo's won it in a poker game.

RShannon
06-04-2009, 13:27
check out the book "the great lakes diving guide 2nd edition ' by Chris Kohl it covers all the spots ...kingston, brockville, toby, oakville , lake erie all the great lakes dives $25.

cheers

Rob