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Zenagirl
08-04-2007, 19:44
I'm curious as to how many other people review their dives in an effort to learn from them, and I don't mean reviewing their log book or computer later necessarily, I mean thinking about what happened, what you did, and what you could have done better or differently.

For instance, the first time I went into deco. on a dive I was already doing my ascent and only had a 1 min. deco. obligation. My computer (Aeris AI) doesn't do a safety stop countdown if you've gone into deco., but I did a 3 minute safety stop anyway since I thought that was smart. In thinking later about the dive, I decided that rather than doing a 3 min. safety stop, it would have been smarter to hang at 20' and breathe my tank down more, moving my computer farther out of the yellow nitrogen bars, and potentially into the green. I had plenty of gas to do it, and a 10 min. stop wouldn't have been a big deal.

Anyone else want to share?

creggur
08-04-2007, 19:53
My wife and I just got certified, and just like we did with our instructor during training during SI's we will sit and talk about the dive. What we did right, what we could do better, what we want to work on the next dive.... It's a great way to go over it because your buddy may have a different perspective on what was going on during the dive.... Good opportunity to learn...

Dive-aholic
08-05-2007, 00:07
My wife and I hang at the surface after every dive and talk about the dive, both good and bad. We will stay there for a minimum of 10 minutes, especially after doing a deco dive. We call it surface deco. We even debrief our students in the water this way. There no sense in overexerting yourself with an exit immediately after the dive. Of course, we do mainly shore dives. It would probably be a little different if we did a lot of boat dives.

medic001918
08-05-2007, 11:28
I always review my dives to think of what I could improve upon or learn from a dive. The thing I know I really need to work on is navigation...

Shane

cummings66
08-06-2007, 18:36
I don't always critique a dive I did. I will if I know I could have done something better or different, the moment I goof up I usually realize it and will think it through later on.

Some days I just dive and everything clicks and I'm happy, other dives I'll see a problem and address it.

TxHockeyGuy
08-06-2007, 18:43
If something went wrong, or nearly went wrong, I will definitely think back on the dive. But for just an average dive I don't worry about it.

wxboy911
08-06-2007, 18:45
Whether its changing tank or on the ride home we go over the good and the bad-It seems like everytime we go out we learn something.

TropicalSoul
07-12-2008, 19:15
I'm curious as to how many other people review their dives in an effort to learn from them, and I don't mean reviewing their log book or computer later necessarily, I mean thinking about what happened, what you did, and what you could have done better or differently.

For instance, the first time I went into deco. on a dive I was already doing my ascent and only had a 1 min. deco. obligation. My computer (Aeris AI) doesn't do a safety stop countdown if you've gone into deco., but I did a 3 minute safety stop anyway since I thought that was smart. In thinking later about the dive, I decided that rather than doing a 3 min. safety stop, it would have been smarter to hang at 20' and breathe my tank down more, moving my computer farther out of the yellow nitrogen bars, and potentially into the green. I had plenty of gas to do it, and a 10 min. stop wouldn't have been a big deal.

Anyone else want to share?

You are a very smart diver. And may I gently suggest next time you will have more fun and cruise around for the extra gas time you had between 30-15 feet...and maybe think about occupying yourself if you have nothing interesting to watch, by practising your mid water column hovering (more difficult to do the shallower one is), mask clearing, mask removal/replacement, dropping your 2d stage & doing reg recovery...the things we all earned but many divers never practise and later wish they had.

in_cavediver
07-12-2008, 19:44
My wife and I always talk about our dives. Well, unless it was that bad we just want to forget it ever happened....

Realistically, we learn from every dive. To really learn, we talk about what we did/saw and why. We share what we think about the others choices/actions underwater. It just keeps us sharp.

Splitlip
07-12-2008, 20:17
I'm curious as to how many other people review their dives in an effort to learn from them, and I don't mean reviewing their log book or computer later necessarily, I mean thinking about what happened, what you did, and what you could have done better or differently.

For instance, the first time I went into deco. on a dive I was already doing my ascent and only had a 1 min. deco. obligation. My computer (Aeris AI) doesn't do a safety stop countdown if you've gone into deco., but I did a 3 minute safety stop anyway since I thought that was smart. In thinking later about the dive, I decided that rather than doing a 3 min. safety stop, it would have been smarter to hang at 20' and breathe my tank down more, moving my computer farther out of the yellow nitrogen bars, and potentially into the green. I had plenty of gas to do it, and a 10 min. stop wouldn't have been a big deal.

Anyone else want to share?

You are a very smart diver. And may I gently suggest next time you will have more fun and cruise around for the extra gas time you had between 30-15 feet...and maybe think about occupying yourself if you have nothing interesting to watch, by practising your mid water column hovering (more difficult to do the shallower one is), mask clearing, mask removal/replacement, dropping your 2d stage & doing reg recovery...the things we all earned but many divers never practise and later wish they had.

:smiley20:

As for reviewing the dive..IMO, that is why God gave us beer, sweet tea, wings and 1/2 # burgers.
Brass Ring Pub American Restaurant in Lake Park FL - Restaurant Guide (http://www.palmbeachpost.com/dining/restaurants/25964/DetailedList.jspd?activity=25964)

Sasha_K
07-12-2008, 20:46
Hm. I actually never did this, nor did anyone recommend I do it. I definitely changed my mind and will be doing if from now on.

mselizann
07-12-2008, 20:58
My husband and I talk about every dive- about our weighting, what we've seen, how warm/cold we were, and how we can continue to communicate better during the dive........

digitalman
07-12-2008, 22:07
I always review my dives to think of what I could improve upon or learn from a dive. The thing I know I really need to work on is navigation...

Shane

Even with a navigation speciality, I believe my navigation could use some fine tuning.

LCF
07-13-2008, 08:36
My buddies and I make a debrief just an expected part of every dive -- What went well, what could have been better, and whether anybody had any issues in how the dive was planned or executed. We also give one another feedback on technique -- was somebody kicking up silt, or not trimmed out properly, or waving his light around? You learn that way.

Vercingetorix
07-13-2008, 08:41
I'll self-review my dives, especially if I've done something different, such as a weighting change, change of tank position, skill practiced, etc. These are all noted in my log book for future reference.

If something skill needs improvement that we practiced on the dive, such as long distance navigation, then my buddy and I will discuss how to improve technique. These notes are added to the log as well.

For instance, the other day, I shot an SMB from a 15-foot platform first time ever. First time: all went well. Second time: tried something different. Not so well, and noted in log. My buddy also shot an SMB with similar results.

Grin
07-14-2008, 08:59
The one thing I always do is: Download my computer (usually on Monday) and verify what I think I did on my dives. I am #1 curious about my accent profiles. #2 curious about actualy dive times and temperatures and general motions, and depths, I covered throughout my dive. The computer either backs up what you think you did, or informs you of what you really did.