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Mtrewyn
05-17-2008, 11:45
What are some good specialty's? or bad ones? Which ones you recommend or not recommend?

I know any are good in the whole education reason stuff and all, but in reality what are good ones vs. bad ones?

scubasamurai
05-17-2008, 11:49
of course get the enriched air certification that is a good one to have.
but depending on what kind of diver you want to become? thinking about wrecks take the wreck, thinking going tech diver get the deep diver and intro to caven etc'.
i personal think some of the courses are just to make a buck but that is me.

Charles R
05-17-2008, 13:37
One's that I would recommend for any diver:
1. Peek performance Buoyancy (You don't want to be that guy that hit's the reef)
2. Nitrox (At Some point you will want to dive it)
3. Navigation (Everyone gets lost and underwater its harder to ask for directions)
4. Search And Recovery (At some point you will loose something you want back)

After these it comes down to what you want to do. Like already mentioned. Wreck, Cave, DPV, Fish ID, Photography its all about what make diving the best for you.:smiley20:

Shark girl
05-17-2008, 14:17
I guess the key is to think about what will be useful for furthering you skills as a diver and teaching you what you want to know. To me, some of the specialities seemed fun but also quite 'fluffy', and wanted to become a better diver through it. I did Peak Performance Buoyancy (very useful), Search and Recovery (just learning to shoot a marker buoy and lift bag is helpful if you've never had to do it!), and wreck (something I definately want to more of and tied in well with nav/ ppb). Night could be another good option if you've never done a night dive- I love them! My LDS didn't offer nitrox as an option, but I'll do it as a speciality when on holiday next. As for the 'bad' ones? My friend had a blast doing naturalist but it was definately 'fluff' based. Photography also seems fairly pointless- the biggest thing I've done to improve my photography at the level I'm at is work on my buoyancy! My instructor let me take my camera to play with on my wreck dive.

RikRaeder
05-17-2008, 14:45
I'd say things you can work on yourself, you probably don't need a card for. Specialties that contain special techniques or skills are probably best studied under some kind of tutelage. Your AOW manual should give you some idea of what is what. I think this varies from person to person.

CompuDude
05-17-2008, 15:30
Depends on what you're talking about: AOW course, where you get a small introduction, or the full specialty courses.

For AOW, Peak Performance Buoyancy, Night (just for an intro... this doesn't really warrant an entire specialty, IMO), Navigation, and Search and Recovery are all good options. Stick to the basics.

After AOW, for full specialties, again, PPB, Nav, S&R, Drysuit, Deep... whatever will match best with the type of diving you're interested in.

huvrr
05-19-2008, 08:00
I would recommend not making a shopping list of specialties and just take the next thing you want to learn. Let the direction you decide to take your diving dictate what you choose to do next. I know folks that sign up for, say, padi master SD and just are filling squares. Take it one step at a time and you will also get more out of it.

Mtrewyn
05-19-2008, 17:27
I would recommend not making a shopping list of specialties and just take the next thing you want to learn. Let the direction you decide to take your diving dictate what you choose to do next. I know folks that sign up for, say, padi master SD and just are filling squares. Take it one step at a time and you will also get more out of it.

This is more my style of learning things, I was looking for thoughts on what good ones are and useless ones are

ChrisA
05-19-2008, 17:41
[quote=huvrr;174696]
This is more my style of learning things, I was looking for thoughts on what good ones are and useless ones are

The only specialy c-card that you will ever be asked to show is "Nitrox". You can't buy the gas without the card. (No one will ever ask to see your fish ID card.)

Rescue class is also very importent. Every diver needs this.

After these you can learn on your own or from buddies and just push your experiance level out a littel bit at a time by traking some small "baby steps". A specialty class can skip you ahead many baby steps

comet24
05-19-2008, 17:48
While this is all subjective to each person.

Basic would be get AOL, rescue and Nitrox. Then it's up to you and the instructor will play a big part of the classes worth. My advise would be to talk to the instructor before taking a specialty class.

Goober
05-19-2008, 17:52
I'll have to echo most of what you have read. IMHO pick the ones that intrest YOU, the ones you feel will benifit Your dives. You will be more apt to retain what they teach you.

Wishing you the best in whatever you choose.

CompuDude
05-19-2008, 23:52
[quote=huvrr;174696]
This is more my style of learning things, I was looking for thoughts on what good ones are and useless ones are

The only specialy c-card that you will ever be asked to show is "Nitrox". You can't buy the gas without the card. (No one will ever ask to see your fish ID card.)

Rescue class is also very importent. Every diver needs this.

After these you can learn on your own or from buddies and just push your experiance level out a littel bit at a time by traking some small "baby steps". A specialty class can skip you ahead many baby steps

Drysuit is another card you'll be asked to show, if you ever have to rent one.

If your diving is all warm, not really needed. But if you'll be doing any drysuit diving, you'll want that cert, even if you're a drysuit pro, because not many shops will rent to you without one... and stuff happens.

Martin2
05-20-2008, 13:04
I don't have the experience that some divers do, but here's what I've done. I've taken the courses that I felt like I needed some additional instructor time on. For example, we recently took Night/Limited Vis because I absolutely hate limited vis situations and I wanted some feedback and supervised dives to help me feel more comfortable in a limited vis situation.

MSilvia
05-20-2008, 13:26
There's almost always value in having someone with experience show you the ropes, but that doesn't necessarily have to be an instructor. In many cases, a little reading and a mentor can be as good or better.

I would definately seek out a qualified instructor for the following:

Any mixed gas diving, be it recreational nitrox, hypoxic trimix, or anything in between
Gas blending
Visual inspection or OEM equipment repair certification
Any overhead diving, like cavern, cave, ice, or wreck penetration
Diving unusual profiles like Decompression or Altitude diving
Rescue or Public Safety Diving
Deep diving
Marine archaeology/Science Diver
Complex equipment like Rebreathers or DPVs
Skills training like peak performance buoyancy or GUE fundamentalsOther training for which an instructor might be helpful, but for which a good book or mentor might be as good or better:

Underwater photography or video
Fish Identification or Underwater Naturalist
Underwater hunting
Kayak diving
Search and recovery
Drysuit diving
Equipment specialist
Boat or Drift Diver
Navigation
Night Diving