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Geoff_T
05-26-2008, 02:45
So here’s the question my wife is planning to buy me a cylinder for my birthday. Yes I know 2 would be better but it is a present after all. I am thinking al 80 for the size but I would like to double my cylinders up in the future when I get around to obtaining that second cylinder. So what I need to know is if the ST al 80 cylinders come with the genesis valves attached are these modular valves. If not does anybody know If I can get them to substitute another valve type that is modular. Or should I not bother with that yet. Is there a specific reason that I should not think about doubling AL tanks? I personally would prefer steel but the cost is not in the cards at the moment. Thank you for the help.

in_cavediver
05-26-2008, 08:12
So here’s the question my wife is planning to buy me a cylinder for my birthday. Yes I know 2 would be better but it is a present after all. I am thinking al 80 for the size but I would like to double my cylinders up in the future when I get around to obtaining that second cylinder. So what I need to know is if the ST al 80 cylinders come with the genesis valves attached are these modular valves. If not does anybody know If I can get them to substitute another valve type that is modular. Or should I not bother with that yet. Is there a specific reason that I should not think about doubling AL tanks? I personally would prefer steel but the cost is not in the cards at the moment. Thank you for the help.

Geoff,

First, I wouldn't worry about the valves being modular. Just plan on buying a complete manifold when getting the bands. (I gave $100 for the last one I bought (Sea Elite)

As for tanks and doubles, the first pressing question is do you dive wet or dry? AL 80's are great in a wetsuit but leave a lot to be desired in a drysuit. There are a few steel tanks that are appropriate as doubles in a wetsuit but most work better with drysuits. This is all due to the buoyancy characteristics of the tanks in question.

skdvr
05-26-2008, 09:45
I will add thougth that if you are planning on doubling the cylinders up later AL tanks will be easier to do this with than Steel tanks will be. AL tanks seem to be more compatible (same dimensions) across a wide range of build dates. Steel tanks will vary greatly. Just as a example. I have a Worthington HP 130 from 2005, and one of my buddies just purchased a brand new Worthington HP 130 and there is a VERY noticeable difference between the two, when they are side by side and would NOT work for doubles. So if you are looking to doubles I would either suggest to buy two tanks now (if your wants and needs dictate steel), or just get one AL 80 now maybe another one later, and then if you want to double them up at some point you could do that or save up your money and buy a set of steel tanks that will fit your needs at that time instead of trying to guess what your needs are going to be a year or two down the road.

Phil

Geoff_T
05-26-2008, 10:03
Thank you this pretty much answers my questions. I am diving wet and don't plan on going dry in the near future, as I am now located in Texas. As for compatibility skdvr answered another thing I was wondering which is the compatibility so once again thanks.

If anybody else has anything I should consider please speak up.

cummings66
05-26-2008, 15:01
Doubles are interesting in that there are many ways to skin a cat, but to be honest you should plan on sticking to the same brand cylinder and preferably the same age. Al cylinders do vary but not nearly as much as steel cylinders to. If you can afford it, buy two AL cylinders at the same time and tell them you want to double them up, use them as singles until you save up for the hardware on doubles. That's the way to insure you have matching cylinders. It's not as risky buying separately, but there is some risk.

WD8CDH
05-30-2008, 14:52
Another choice if you can go for the extra cash now, buy one tank with a double manifold and one modular valve plug. When you go doubles, just by a second tank and put the manifold back togeather.

Geoff_T
05-30-2008, 16:25
This is what I had originaly been thinking. But Now I think I will go with a standard valve arrangement. I will still hold out hope of getting my wife into scuba. If that happens I may just give that tank to her and buy matched dubbles when the time comes.

CompuDude
05-30-2008, 17:12
Another choice if you can go for the extra cash now, buy one tank with a double manifold and one modular valve plug. When you go doubles, just by a second tank and put the manifold back togeather.

The downside to that is you end up with one normal tank, and one tank with a reverse valve, when you're diving them as singles.

I'd rather have regular valves on singles, and pick up a full, normal doubles manifold when/if the time comes to double them. Then you have a spare set of valves to hang onto as a spare, or available to sell and offset the cost of the manifold. The price difference is not huge, but the flexibility is, IMO.

WD8CDH
06-02-2008, 15:46
I meant just buy ONE tank but with the doubles manifold. Plug the right side valve and put the rest of the manifold into a box until you buy the second tank.