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JugglingMonkeys
08-06-2007, 18:48
Hey what are your tips for avoiding/minimizing this?

here are some:
1. Upon arrival get out in the sunlight. It helps your body to figure out when it is day.
2. leave a day or two for downtime, if possible, upon arrival. After years of flying in and out of time zones i've finally started doing this. Getting old!
3. Try to fly during the day if possible, not overnight flights.
4. drink water on the flight - not alcohol or coffee.
5. have some melatonin or sleeping pills at hand - especially for the first couple nights.

thesmoothdome
08-06-2007, 18:57
[QUOTE=JugglingMonkeys;18420]Hey what are your tips for avoiding/minimizing this?

here are some:

4. drink water on the flight - not alcohol or coffee.

Ok, you've just taken away 2 of the 4 basic food groups from me. What am I supposed to do?:smilie39:

deepdiver47
08-06-2007, 19:48
Hey what are your tips for avoiding/minimizing this?

here are some:
1. Upon arrival get out in the sunlight. It helps your body to figure out when it is day.

yes, if you arrive during the day


2. leave a day or two for downtime, if possible, upon arrival. After years of flying in and out of time zones i've finally started doing this. Getting old!

can't do this during a business trip. But it is a good idea.
In general when flying east (China), lag is 2 days, flying home (Houston) its 5. Lag is much greater flying westbound.


3. Try to fly during the day if possible, not overnight flights.

Very diificult to do during a 15 hour flight from NJ to Hong Kong

4. drink water on the flight - not alcohol or coffee.

yes, critical. Hydrate makes a huge difference. Everytime water is offered, drink it.

5. have some melatonin or sleeping pills at hand - especially for the first couple nights.

3 mg will do it, try to take it late as you will get up at 2 AM, subsequently, you will be sleeping at 2 PM.


Another, of you are tired on a flight then sleep don't fel compelled to though.

MEL-DC Diver
08-06-2007, 20:27
Also, if arriving in the morning or afternoon, try and hold out to your normal bedtime as much as possible. A quick catnap sounds tempting, but you can easily sleep for hours which will really mess up your body clock.

As a frequent trans-pacific/atlantic traveler, this is the one rule I never waiver on.

JugglingMonkeys
08-06-2007, 20:30
yes, this is a cardinal rule: never nap in the afternoon! Especially in the first couple of days.

However, this is far easier said than done.
:smiley11:

namabiru
08-06-2007, 21:41
If you can, business class is your friend. You can rest better on the plane, the food won't make you as sick, and it's quieter. Plus the rich people lounges are great. Better food to munch on, not so many squalling kids to deal with, and it's quieter there too.

Outside the US, they treat you better too (no surprise there). Usually the booze is just out on the counter, you help yourself, and there are better amenities.

If you can, also, shower in transit. You'll feel heaps better. Even if you have to pay to do so. But in the Lufthansa rich people lounge in Munich, that's one of the services offered.

JugglingMonkeys
08-06-2007, 21:50
yes, business lounges are more restful.
they come automatically with business class tickets.

otherwise i've heard that priority pass (http://prioritypass.com/) is good.

but have not tried it. may try it soon.

Illini_Fan
08-06-2007, 22:18
On American (and all OneWorld partners) PLT and EXPLT level get access to lounges outside of North America and certain other sites with any ticket. While I completely agree with business class -- especially on the foreign carriers, if you have to fly cattle class you can still get into the lounges if you have the status.

JugglingMonkeys
08-06-2007, 22:29
the top two levels of United also give lounge access on any international ticket with Star Alliance.

namabiru
08-07-2007, 12:27
Yeah, that's right. Star Alliance does reciprocal lounge use. If you don't have the miles, though, you still have to have the ticket to let you in. I just checked out Priority Pass, and the prices aren't bad at all. 10 visits free, then just $24 after is pretty good, when you figure how much the average person might fly, and the number of airports they visit. I may have to consider getting the pass.

MEL-DC Diver
08-07-2007, 12:56
If you can, business class is your friend. You can rest better on the plane, the food won't make you as sick, and it's quieter. Plus the rich people lounges are great. Better food to munch on, not so many squalling kids to deal with, and it's quieter there too.


What's wrong with squalling kids? Actually, mine are pretty good travelers.

namabiru
08-07-2007, 15:42
Mmm... not when you're on a 24-hour journey.

No, I don't mind kids at all, it's just when they get whiny and start yowling and stay that way for a long period of time. Not that I'm the only person who's annoyed--I'm sure the parents are more frazzled.

namabiru
08-07-2007, 15:44
Ok, you've just taken away 2 of the 4 basic food groups from me. What am I supposed to do?:smilie39:

Yes, I hear you there on the alcohol bit. After all, you *should* try to get your money's worth when you fly :smiley36:

tywenglar
08-08-2007, 10:42
I travel a decent amount and I've found that if you travel based on your destination it works well. What I mean is if flying to Europe (7 hours ahead of us) Take a night flight so that you arrive mid morning. try to sleep on the plane (I take Ambien). This way when you arrive it is day and you are rested enough to be active until evening when you can go to sleep a little early and wake up hte next morning relatively acclimated to the difference. When I come home I do the opposite. I usually leave morning in Europe which puts you home mid-afternoon. Stay awake on the flight. This way you are a little tired when you get home but lets face it you'd be tired anyway. Go to bed a little early again and when you wake up you are good to go.

The main point is to plan your sleep based on where you are going. Otherwise, you end up staying awake for 20 hours or something crazy and your body doesn't know what to do.

namabiru
08-08-2007, 11:19
Yep, I've found that works too. Or best yet you time your flight so you arrive at your destination *in* the evening, so you can just go to sleep after winding down a bit.

My last trip, to Doha (9 hours difference), worked out well this way. I arrived at roughly 19.30, and by the time I got through immigration, got done at the lost luggage counter (thanks United, for leaving my bag in Chicago, and again in Denver on the way back), got to the hotel, got checked in, got my suit ready for the next day, it was about 22.00. A quick trip to the bar to wind down a bit, and by my normal bedtime of 11 I was ready to sleep.

Then again, I was wide awake at 3.30... but so it goes.

ScaredSilly
08-08-2007, 12:04
Adjust your watch for where you are going so that you starting thinking in that time zone.

JugglingMonkeys
08-08-2007, 23:47
i just read that some airlines are keeping the cabin pressure right at the legal minimum to conserve fuel, and it means that passengers get less oxygen and
suffer much more jet lag.
:smiley5:

namabiru
08-09-2007, 11:07
Wouldn't surprise me. US airlines, for the most part, are pikers. Continental is one of the few exceptions. But go somewhere and fly on a US airline, then switch to one from elsewhere. You'll notice the difference immediately.

If you can, you should fly Singapore Air. The economy class alone is luxurious and nice.

I'll tell you, if you ever have the opportunity, fly Qatar Airways. Business class if you can. It's awesome. Better yet, connect through Doha with a layover. They've constructed an entire building for business/first class passengers. It looks like a hotel, with red-suited bellhops. The first class side has a whole spa. Serious.

JugglingMonkeys
08-09-2007, 11:11
it sounds great!
i do, however, need to stay within the Star Alliance so i maintain my united 1k each year.

JugglingMonkeys
08-09-2007, 11:12
although singapore Air IS Star alliance aren't they?

MEL-DC Diver
08-09-2007, 11:14
you bet your booty they are.

The list:
Air Canada
Air New Zealand
ANA
Asiana Airlines
Austrian
bmi
LOT Polish Airlines
Lufthansa
Scandinavian Airlines
Singapore Airlines
South African Airways
Spanair
SWISS
TAP Portugal
THAI
United
US Airways

tywenglar
08-09-2007, 14:02
i just read that some airlines are keeping the cabin pressure right at the legal minimum to conserve fuel, and it means that passengers get less oxygen and
suffer much more jet lag.
:smiley5:

Not true. Our company's pilot is a retired Contineental Captain. The presurization system on a plane has no affect on fuel burn. The bottom line is that the presurization system on an aircraft is designed to keep pressure at or below 8,000 feet above MSL. And...since transcontinental flights typically fly higher than domestic the system ends up at its limit which equates to 8,000 feet above MSL. If you are from Colorado or North Carolina etc. where normal elevation is 3,000-4,000+ above MSL it is not as bad as those of us that live on the coast at 50 feet above MSL. Doesn't help much but it is just a fact of air travel.

MEL-DC Diver
08-09-2007, 14:45
Note that the new 787 will be able to increase the cabin humidity over what is currently available today due to the nature of its construction. This may help a bit with the dehydration, particularly on the longer flights. For us US travelers, only Continental and Northwest have signed up for some of these birds so far.

loudgonzo
08-09-2007, 14:50
On American (and all OneWorld partners) PLT and EXPLT level get access to lounges outside of North America and certain other sites with any ticket. While I completely agree with business class -- especially on the foreign carriers, if you have to fly cattle class you can still get into the lounges if you have the status.

You will also get access to the lounges in the US if you are departing on an international flight that day.

My 2 pennies, depending on what airport you're at, hang out at a OneWorlds partner lounge instead of the admirals club.

As I posted on another thread, join a frequent flyer program and stick with it, business/first is your best friend especially on long flights.

As for passing up on coffee and alcohol, YMMV. I don't pass it up though.

JugglingMonkeys
08-09-2007, 18:34
i just read that some airlines are keeping the cabin pressure right at the legal minimum to conserve fuel, and it means that passengers get less oxygen and
suffer much more jet lag.
:smiley5:

Not true. Our company's pilot is a retired Contineental Captain. The presurization system on a plane has no affect on fuel burn. The bottom line is that the presurization system on an aircraft is designed to keep pressure at or below 8,000 feet above MSL. And...since transcontinental flights typically fly higher than domestic the system ends up at its limit which equates to 8,000 feet above MSL. If you are from Colorado or North Carolina etc. where normal elevation is 3,000-4,000+ above MSL it is not as bad as those of us that live on the coast at 50 feet above MSL. Doesn't help much but it is just a fact of air travel.

Thanks! That's great to hear. The report came from the Financial Times. But this is a relief.

JugglingMonkeys
08-09-2007, 18:37
[quote=Illini_Fan;18610]My 2 pennies, depending on what airport you're at, hang out at a OneWorlds partner lounge instead of the admirals club.

you raise an important point - "depending on what airport you're at"

first study your airport's connections to the various destinations you're likely to travel to.
then pick the airline that has the most. For me, it's United.
Then stay with airline - even if it means a little higher fare sometimes (the tradeoff here will be differnet for each of us).
Then stay with that airline!

Zeagle Eagle
11-24-2008, 10:36
If you can, business class is your friend. You can rest better on the plane, the food won't make you as sick, and it's quieter. Plus the rich people lounges are great. Better food to munch on, not so many squalling kids to deal with, and it's quieter there too.


What's wrong with squalling kids? Actually, mine are pretty good travelers.

The squalling part!

Zeagle Eagle
11-24-2008, 10:40
i just read that some airlines are keeping the cabin pressure right at the legal minimum to conserve fuel, and it means that passengers get less oxygen and
suffer much more jet lag.
:smiley5:
I would like to know where you read that.

WV Diver
11-24-2008, 10:45
Caffeine, in all its various forms.

Zeagle Eagle
11-24-2008, 10:50
i just read that some airlines are keeping the cabin pressure right at the legal minimum to conserve fuel, and it means that passengers get less oxygen and
suffer much more jet lag.
:smiley5:
Not true! air pressure in the cabin has no relationship to fuel burn.

Regulations specify that the air pressure in the cabin of a commercial airliner must not be lower than that found at an altitude of 8,000 ft (2,438 m). The pressure (http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/atmosphere/q0049.shtml) at this altitude is 1,572 pounds per square foot or 75 kilopascals. This pressure is only about 75% that found at sea level, which is 2,116 psf (101 kPa).
http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/atmosphere/density/density.jpg
Changes in atmospheric properties with altitude This pressure was chosen for two reasons. First, the skin of the aircraft is designed to maintain its shape given the difference in pressure internal and external to the cabin. Aircraft manufacturers want to keep that difference as small as possible because it reduces the amount of structure needed to maintain the integrity of the aircraft's shape. The less structure required, the lighter and less expensive the plane will be.
Ideally, the internal and external pressures would always be equal to minimize the structural weight. However, the pressure cannot be too low or passengers could suffer from altitude sickness or pass out from oxygen deprivation. Most cases of altitude sickness occur at altitudes greater than 10,000 ft (3,050 m) and oxygen deprivation is typically not a concern below 14,000 ft (4,265 m).
The altitude of 8,000 ft was chosen as a tradeoff to satisfy these two requirements. The pressure at this altitude is low enough that it significantly reduces the amount of structure needed to maintain the plane's shape yet high enough that it prevents altitude sickness among the passengers. The pressure on a specific aircraft may vary as different manufacturers offer different environmental systems aboard their planes. In general, most airlines maintain an internal pressure comparable to that found at 6,000 to 8,000 ft (1,830 to 2,440 m). The pressure will obviously increase at lower altitudes to equalize with the external pressure encountered at takeoff and landing.

teerlkay
11-24-2008, 11:19
Caffeine, in all its various forms.
I couldn't agree more!

For the people who have self discipline (i am not included in this group) - if you are able to refrain from caffeine for 48 hours before and during your flight, when you arrive at your destination it could be more effective during the moments when you want a siesta!

WV Diver
11-24-2008, 11:47
A good boost of carbs is good when nappy time shows up unwanted. A handful a potato chips or something along those lines is always helpful. A few laps around the hotel won't hurt you either. I just tend to plow through it and usually feel fine by the second day.

Travelnsj
11-24-2008, 18:37
I usually get jet lagged when coming home. This last time to Indonesia it took me a week before I quit waking up at 2am and wanting to go to bed at 6pm.