PDA

View Full Version : My feet sink. Help!



Skinsfan1311
07-03-2008, 09:10
I dive a Zeagle Stiletto BC, and keep about 1/2 of the weight in the rear pouches.

My fins are SP Jets w/springs and I wear 5 mil boots.

My buoyancy is far from perfect, but it's good enough that I don't bounce around, or bang into coral and stuff like that.

When I hover horizonatally, my feet sink, unless I bend my knees at a 90 degree angle.

I love the Jets, and getting rid of those is not an option.

I've tried raising the tank, to the point where it hits the back of my head, and it didn't work.

Any tips or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

awap
07-03-2008, 09:46
I'm not familiar with the zeagle BC, but the standard solution to your problem is to move weight higher. If the BC rear weight pockets are low, you may want to move some of that weight to a higher point like a tank strap.

You could also try some weight up on your tank valve as a temporary fix to see how much of a weight shift you need. It probably is not much. I also tend to be a bit leg heavy and have countered it by attaching about 1.5 pounds high on my back plate in the area of my shoulders. This trims me out pretty well under most conditions. But with little exposure protection and an Al tank, I have to keep the knees bent when the tank gets low (or use my Mk7 1st stage which weights 2+ pounds).

Vercingetorix
07-03-2008, 09:49
Asked and answered: http://forum.scubatoys.com/scuba-stories-comments-questions-dont-fit-elsewhere/3181-my-feet-sink.html (http://forum.scubatoys.com/../scuba-stories-comments-questions-dont-fit-elsewhere/3181-my-feet-sink.html)

Also, after raising the tank, rotate the tank about 45 degrees, so that your head does not hit the first stage.

Skinsfan1311
07-03-2008, 10:19
I'm not familiar with the zeagle BC, but the standard solution to your problem is to move weight higher. If the BC rear weight pockets are low, you may want to move some of that weight to a higher point like a tank strap.

You could also try some weight up on your tank valve as a temporary fix to see how much of a weight shift you need. It probably is not much. I also tend to be a bit leg heavy and have countered it by attaching about 1.5 pounds high on my back plate in the area of my shoulders. This trims me out pretty well under most conditions. But with little exposure protection and an Al tank, I have to keep the knees bent when the tank gets low (or use my Mk7 1st stage which weights 2+ pounds).

Thanks!

The BC is a back-inflate with an integrated weight system that includes a pair of rear weight pockets that straddle the tank and are located low on the BC.


Asked and answered: http://forum.scubatoys.com/scuba-stories-comments-questions-dont-fit-elsewhere/3181-my-feet-sink.html (http://forum.scubatoys.com/../scuba-stories-comments-questions-dont-fit-elsewhere/3181-my-feet-sink.html)

Also, after raising the tank, rotate the tank about 45 degrees, so that your head does not hit the first stage.


Thank you very much! I tried the search function and had a heck of a time.

rongoodman
07-04-2008, 01:23
When I hover horizonatally, my feet sink, unless I bend my knees at a 90 degree angle.


I'm not seeing the problem. That's the starting position for the frog, flutter, and back kicks, and helicopter turn. Take a look at some of the videos here (http://www.youtube.com/results?search=related&search_query=%20DIR%20Skills%20Video&v=btgcJXUNCY0)

chinacat46
07-04-2008, 12:19
Seems to me your problem is the jets. They are negative. Have you tried OMS slipstreams? They look like jets but a little stiffer but they are made of a mono fiber so are much lighter. You can have your jets without the negativity of the fins.

rongoodman
07-04-2008, 12:56
The DiveRite fins are made of a similar material, but available in smaller sizes, which the Slipstreams aren't(yet). As much as I like the way the Jets work in the water, it's a constant struggle for me to keep my feet up when I'm wearing them. It sounds like they work for the OP, though.

Skinsfan1311
07-07-2008, 09:28
When I hover horizonatally, my feet sink, unless I bend my knees at a 90 degree angle.


I'm not seeing the problem. That's the starting position for the frog, flutter, and back kicks, and helicopter turn. Take a look at some of the videos here (http://www.youtube.com/results?search=related&search_query=%20DIR%20Skills%20Video&v=btgcJXUNCY0)

Interesting....maybe it's not so bad....my title is a little misleading with the "Help!" portion in the thread title. The feet sinking isn't severe, but it is consistent. When I'm horiziontal, with my feet straight, they will sink, albeit slowly. I don't want to constantly keep my knees at 90 degree angles, when I'm not finning, especially during drift dives.

I don't dive as often as I'd like and, when I do so, I play around with my buoyancy and trim. I'm hoping that a slight adjustment to my trim is all that's needed.


Seems to me your problem is the jets. They are negative. Have you tried OMS slipstreams? They look like jets but a little stiffer but they are made of a mono fiber so are much lighter. You can have your jets without the negativity of the fins.

I haven't tried the OMS slipstreams, and I love the Jets. Getting rid of them is the option of last resort. As I stated to rongoodman, I don't dive as frequently as I'd like to, so I don't have a lot of opportunities to mess with the trim.

Thanks, again everyone!

rongoodman
07-07-2008, 13:55
The Jet fins are negative, so when you extend your legs you are hanging them on the end of a longer lever, magnifying their effect. It sounds like you can stretch your legs straight to get the kinks out without flipping to vertical, so being balanced with your body flat, legs up, and fins flat seems like the place to be most of the time. I certainly struggled to get there, but am happy I can do it now.

Skinsfan1311
07-07-2008, 14:36
The Jet fins are negative, so when you extend your legs you are hanging them on the end of a longer lever, magnifying their effect. It sounds like you can stretch your legs straight to get the kinks out without flipping to vertical, so being balanced with your body flat, legs up, and fins flat seems like the place to be most of the time. I certainly struggled to get there, but am happy I can do it now.

Your description is spot-on :smiley20: and makes me feel better about my "technique".

I'm pretty comfy in the water and I probably just need to dive more, before I go messing around with too many different configurations.

Largo
07-07-2008, 19:46
How about neck weights?


Just kidding. :)


Those Zeagle BCs are great, but if the tank bands are not assembled correctly, your horizontal trim gets screwed up big-time.


For vertical trim, you might try adjusting the height of your tank (make the valve ride higher). That might help, by shifting some weight forward.

My hired goons have a lot of trim problems, so...