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BORG
07-06-2008, 12:47
I had my first dive yesterday with my Pinnacle EVO2 drysuit with the attached boots. Everything went pretty well. I have not taken the course and really liked just being able to add a little pop of air into the suit and getting more comfortable as I went deeper. I was very careful in what I was doing to learn how to dive the suit. I had a little bit of floaty feet. I was only diving to 20 ft. to get the suit broken in and getting used to diving it. I know that floaty feet at a deeper depth on an ascent could cause an inversion if I'm not careful.
Are the benefits of no floaty feet and possible lost fins and less inversion risk really realized with using gaiters on a suit like the Pinnacle EVO2?

How does the fact that less air is reaching that area effect squeezing to a harmful level?

Thanks!

in_cavediver
07-06-2008, 15:17
I had my first dive yesterday with my Pinnacle EVO2 drysuit with the attached boots. Everything went pretty well. I have not taken the course and really liked just being able to add a little pop of air into the suit and getting more comfortable as I went deeper. I was very careful in what I was doing to learn how to dive the suit. I had a little bit of floaty feet. I was only diving to 20 ft. to get the suit broken in and getting used to diving it. I know that floaty feet at a deeper depth on an ascent could cause an inversion if I'm not careful.
Are the benefits of no floaty feet and possible lost fins and less inversion risk really realized with using gaiters on a suit like the Pinnacle EVO2?

How does the fact that less air is reaching that area effect squeezing to a harmful level?

Thanks!

Honestly, I look at gaitors as a fit issue of the suit. In my old Whites suit - I don't use them. In my newer Dive Rite I do. Its all about controlling the amount of trapped air and having 'looser' legs in the dive rite suit. (fits great otherwise).

If you have floaty feet that is due to trapped air and baggy legs - try gaitors. If its just floaty feet - there are a lot of alternitives including ankle wieghts and gaitors may have little or no effect. They simple restrict air.

With ankle wieghts, some will say they are a crutch but my opinion is that they are carefully placed trim weight and when used properly - a good thing. Other options including moving your tank higher, moving wieghts or changing fins. Do a search on trim and you should be able to find some well written instructions on getting good trim.

tonka97
07-06-2008, 15:44
I had my first dive yesterday with my Pinnacle EVO2 drysuit with the attached boots. Everything went pretty well. I have not taken the course and really liked just being able to add a little pop of air into the suit and getting more comfortable as I went deeper. I was very careful in what I was doing to learn how to dive the suit. I had a little bit of floaty feet. I was only diving to 20 ft. to get the suit broken in and getting used to diving it. I know that floaty feet at a deeper depth on an ascent could cause an inversion if I'm not careful.
Are the benefits of no floaty feet and possible lost fins and less inversion risk really realized with using gaiters on a suit like the Pinnacle EVO2?

How does the fact that less air is reaching that area effect squeezing to a harmful level?

Thanks!

I just tried out my Pinnacle dry suit (last weekend) and had the floaty feet syndrome.:smiley19:

My instructor said to just let some air out of the suit.:smiley13:

I did.

It worked....no more floaty feet.

:smiley20:

BORG
07-06-2008, 16:16
I may try that as I adjust my buoyancy at depth. I want to have a fairly comfortable suit, not too tight, when I dive. Just not to have feet that are courting an inversion later on.

BORG
07-06-2008, 16:17
Thanks. I'll try those options.

bubbletrubble
07-06-2008, 18:49
I have floaty feet with my baggy-legged Bare Nex-Gen Pro drysuit. I tried ankle weights, but I didn't like having to move extra weight with each kick. Gaiters were the best solution. I haven't had the floaty feet issue since I started using gaiters (about 130 dives ago).

Good luck.

DallasMarineBio
07-06-2008, 22:10
I would try fin keepers (sticky palms) first, as they are about 6 bucks a pair versus the price of gaiters. I agree it's a fit issue, I find I need them in my suit, while others I know with better fitting suits do not. Try the fin keepers first, they may work and save you some dough...

wmspdi
07-06-2008, 22:16
If the suit fits right you shouldn't need them. However if the legs are a little baggy, or you shift to a thinner undergarment (allowing more volume for air in your legs) then they might just solve your problem.

My dive buddy has a pair of Halcyon gaitors that he uses with his stock Diving Concepts trilam suit and he swears by them. I had a "custom cut" Diving Concepts neoprene suit, and currently dive an Andy's DS3 trilam suit with close cut legs and have never needed them. YMMV.

BORG
07-06-2008, 22:44
I'm thinking of getting ankle weights and using spring straps on my fins. I think that should take care of the situation. I was surprised how fast and severe squeeze can take place in a suit. Mine is a custom suit so the legs aren't too baggy. The attached boot has alot of space for air to collect and make it positive. I really enjoy my suit. Many people I've heard from say it takes a long time to have fun and enjoy a drysuit. I had a blast yesterday and it was the first time I've ever dove a drysuit.

bubbletrubble
07-06-2008, 22:57
I'm thinking of getting ankle weights and using spring straps on my fins. I think that should take care of the situation. I was surprised how fast and severe squeeze can take place in a suit. Mine is a custom suit so the legs aren't too baggy. The attached boot has alot of space for air to collect and make it positive. I really enjoy my suit. Many people I've heard from say it takes a long time to have fun and enjoy a drysuit. I had a blast yesterday and it was the first time I've ever dove a drysuit.
I'm sure that your plan of attack will work.

People become comfortable in various drysuits at different rates. I have a dive buddy who did great in his first time ever in a drysuit...but that drysuit was the Whites Fusion. The stretchy outer layer really distributes the air evenly throughout the suit. Air doesn't appear to pool in the feet. The suit has other advantages: less drag through the water and very lightweight. I demoed the suit recently and I had as much flexibility as I do in a 3mm wetsuit!

Enjoy the drysuit.

BORG
07-07-2008, 14:30
I've ordered some spring straps for my fins that I'll use for the drysuit. I've used them before on my Apollo Bio-Fins. They work great and I know this will help to collapse the drysuit boot somewhat to keep air out of collecting in that area.

RoyN
07-08-2008, 01:55
At first, I though I needed gaiters, but I now am happy I didn't need it as I don't have too much air in my drysuit but I do like the air floaty feel in the feet when I'm wearing my drysuit boots. :D

CompuDude
07-08-2008, 15:56
My old drysuit was baggy enough that I appreciated the extra help gaiters offered. My new one fits well enough they are not needed, for which I am grateful.

I'm NOT a fan of ankle weights... I'd do everything I could to try to dive your suit without them, before resorting to that last-ditch effort.

BORG
07-08-2008, 22:08
I have a set of spring straps ordered for my fins that should help to collapse the boot somewhat and keep air in that area to a minimum. I'll just work on diving the suit and get used to it's likes and dislikes.
I LOVE DIVING DRY! I DO FEEL LIKE A SUBMARINE!

mm_dm
07-10-2008, 07:36
My old drysuit was baggy enough that I appreciated the extra help gaiters offered. My new one fits well enough they are not needed, for which I am grateful.

I'm NOT a fan of ankle weights... I'd do everything I could to try to dive your suit without them, before resorting to that last-ditch effort.

I agree completely. If your suit doesn't fit well you have find ways to work around that until you can afford a better fitting one. I am more a fan of a tail weight than of ankle weights and prefer to work at getting the rig balanced first. If your rig is out of balance you can hang stuff all over yourself to try and compensate, but the simple fact is your rig will still be out of balance. Just my 2psi.

vegas911diver
01-31-2011, 14:30
I know this is an old topic, but I figured I will bring this one back instead of starting a new one. At least I looked at previous posts before starting a new one.

I am almost complete with my Tech Diving certs and a few of the missions we have done required me to keep from stirring up a VERY silted bottom. Vis would black out very fast. So I put myself in a feet up position to complete my task and still have good vis, but had a little difficulty getting back to a level position. Before you beat me up, I have the drysuit cert, and I also teach it, so I am familiar with the techniques needed to get rid of trapped air in the feet. I have read the above post and some other threads but I was hoping for insight from tech divers. Do you like using gaiters? Do they aide or restrict your movements? Is there a technique you like to use opposed to another. Thanks in advance for your comments.

in_cavediver
02-01-2011, 07:13
Gaiters is a question of fit. I use them because my suit is a bit 'baggy' in the ankle area. All it does is work to control air movement. I honestly can't tell I have them on once they go on. They do not cover a joint so there should not be mobility issues.

As for other ideas - practice practice practice. When I do tasks - I don't go 'feet up'. I stay pretty much horizontal. I just have learned to not make needless moveements and I have learned to do small precise fin movements to handle positioning. I can go forwards, back or spin on my axis with little movements. Using my breath, I can go up and down.

That said - there are places where I do have to go head down for a few minutes and times when I do get significant air trapped in my feet - even with gaiters. To solve it - I find a location where I can get head up and work the air out. This is really pretty rare for me. I keep a minimum amount of air in my suit to start which really helps minimize it so unless I have a fair amount of air - its a non-issue.

If my suit fit better in the lower legs, it likely would not be an issue but after 3 drysuits - I am still looking for the perfect fit. Of course, I'd likely then add or subract 10-15lbs and screw it up...

cummings66
02-03-2011, 18:25
I've never used them myself but I can say that I've got buddies who've used them and are quite happy. I prefer no gaiters because I like air in my feet when I frog kick. It makes that so much easier now that I'm used to it. Look at my avatar, you can see my legs are not exactly form fit and I've never had an issue.

Personally, I'd do whatever makes it easier for yourself.

Rcontrera
02-05-2011, 02:11
The absolute best accessory you can buy for your drysuit is a GOOD class.

If you use the proper undergarment and know proper use, then these things aren't needed.

I was absolutely blown away quite a few years ago when one drysuit company made a suit designed specifically for people that don't know how to use drysuits. They put a dump valve on one ankle to help when inverted. Of course, the other ankle didn't have one so you still had to know how to roll to get the valve to the high point. They now have valves on both ankles!

When the gaiter idea first came out, it was designed to overcome a crappy undergarment that didn't slow down air at all. Then, it was discovered that you could put WAY more air in an undergarment than it could hold and the tight legs kept the fins from blowing off.

I guess what I am saying is ... just learn to use your stuff properly and skip the gimmicks.