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cozlover
07-24-2008, 17:02
Ok Divers out there I have a question. I'm diving a zeagle brigade switched from a Ranger. here's my problem on the safety stop. I used to be able to hang vertical in the water between 15 and 20 ft with a rise or fall of 1 to 2 ft with the ranger, with the brigade as soon as I stop and try to go vertical I roll onto my back like a turtle.

My weight configuration is total of 18 pounds, 4 lbs in the back on two trim pockets on the upper tank band and 14lbs in the front pockets.

I'm currently on the Island of Cozumel as we speak any suggestions out there? Still have a lot of diving to do since were here until the 5th of august.:smiley19:

ScubaToys Larry
07-24-2008, 17:13
As a quick guess with only that much info - I'd say you are probably over weighted. I wear 18 lbs in a 7 mil suit - and I doubt you are wearing that much suit in Cayman. In salt water with a full 3 mil, I'm at 8 lbs. So I'd guess try to cut down on the lead you are carrying, and if weight in the back pockets are rolling you over - take the weight out of there to start. But unless you weight in at 300+ lbs - or are wearing a lot of neoprene - that seems like a lot of weight for a warm water dive.

The ranger bladder was probably trapping some air in it, so that left you in a head up position - but you should be able to weigh out so there is virtually no air in the BC at the end of the dive - and then whether it's a ranger, a brigade, or a wing, or a jacket BC... if there is no air in the BC, the only thing that can affect things is where the weight is. Since the harnesses are identical - it makes sense to me it was a bit too much lead that used to be compensated by excess air at the top of the ranger bladder.

cozlover
07-25-2008, 21:16
Larry I guess i did forget some info I weigh 250 lbs wearing a 3mm suit. I dumped some lead today and didn't put any weight in the trim pockets that did the trick dumped four lbs of lead and went down with no air in the BC and never had to put any in so all is good.

mrbheagney
08-31-2008, 20:46
You will need to reconfigure your weight, particularly their positioning, until you find something that works for you. Just another excuse to do more diving!

Grin
09-01-2008, 08:07
I'd move the upper tank wieghts into Zeagle weight pouches on the low band. They hold the weight close to you back along side the tank. Better yet get that weight in the front. And the Zeagle weight pouches for the ripcord pouches will hold the weight forward in that area. It also seems like a little air in the bladder, at the safety stop level, should keep you verticle. Maybe overweighting by a couple pounds and thus not completely empying you bladder on your safety stop, might help.
Just wild Guesses and something to think about or try.

DivingCRNA
09-01-2008, 18:19
Ummm.... Why would you WANT to be vertical on the line??? I hope you really mean horizontal..... :weird:

BlowingBubbles
09-02-2008, 11:52
I would think you would want to be vertical on the line. Am I confused here? I don't think I've ever seen anyone horinzontal on the line for a safety stop.

cummings66
09-02-2008, 11:58
I'm horizontal on my stops. Most do it vertically though.

bane51031
12-11-2008, 19:35
The studies indicate that a vertical position is the most effective in allowing off gassing of Nitrogen, just off several articles I have read.....

Splitlip
12-11-2008, 19:43
Also easier to see above you if vertical. I have been hit by a power boat, and I heard it coming. 2 weeks ago I had a barge which broke loose from it's mooring drift 12 ft above me. Open Ocean, I think about sail boats.

I can do a horizontal hang, mid water without a line, but I'll be head up, thankyou.

ektess1
12-11-2008, 19:50
Horizontal places your body at the same depth so you off gas at the same rate. I go vertical when I get close to the surface unless I am following an anchor line up.

K9Pig
12-11-2008, 19:59
I am more comfortable in the vertical position... Yes, I can do the horizontal stop with no problem, but I also like to see above... I like to review drills with dive buddy during the safety stops....

Splitlip
12-11-2008, 20:10
Horizontal places your body at the same depth so you off gas at the same rate. I go vertical when I get close to the surface unless I am following an anchor line up.

Up lines on wrecks, definiitely want to be head up because you can get a fin in the face.

I'll usually go horizontal to take pics at the stop. But when heading up mid water with 2 or 3 buddies, one of whom will shoot a marker, easier to keep eye contact while watching above.

DMWiz
12-11-2008, 20:43
The studies indicate that a vertical position is the most effective in allowing off gassing of Nitrogen, just off several articles I have read.....

I'd like to see these articles...

If you feel safer being vertical than horizontal that's one thing, but I have never heard or read and article that claims being vertical is better.
If you think about it, your whole body is practically at the same depth when you are positioned horizontally in the water column.

Wiz

imasinker
12-11-2008, 20:52
I'd move the upper tank wieghts into Zeagle weight pouches on the low band. They hold the weight close to you back along side the tank. Better yet get that weight in the front. And the Zeagle weight pouches for the ripcord pouches will hold the weight forward in that area. It also seems like a little air in the bladder, at the safety stop level, should keep you verticle. Maybe overweighting by a couple pounds and thus not completely empying you bladder on your safety stop, might help.
Just wild Guesses and something to think about or try.

I had the same problem with my zeagle stiletto, I am tall 6'2 and I moved the trim weights to the bottom cam bands and it corrected my problem. I also only put one 3 pound lead pouch in each rear trim pouch total of 6 pnds, keeping the 20 in the front pouches. I was diving fresh water with a trilam drysuit at this time with a AL 80 tank. I read anarticle that the rear should carry no more than 1/3 your total weight used. Not to sure if it is true, but again worked for me.

Splitlip
12-11-2008, 21:01
I'd move the upper tank wieghts into Zeagle weight pouches on the low band. They hold the weight close to you back along side the tank. Better yet get that weight in the front. And the Zeagle weight pouches for the ripcord pouches will hold the weight forward in that area. It also seems like a little air in the bladder, at the safety stop level, should keep you verticle. Maybe overweighting by a couple pounds and thus not completely empying you bladder on your safety stop, might help.
Just wild Guesses and something to think about or try.

I had the same problem with my zeagle stiletto, I am tall 6'2 and I moved the trim weights to the bottom cam bands and it corrected my problem. I also only put one 3 pound lead pouch in each rear trim pouch total of 6 pnds, keeping the 20 in the front pouches. I was diving fresh water with a trilam drysuit at this time with a AL 80 tank. I read anarticle that the rear should carry no more than 1/3 your total weight used. Not to sure if it is true, but again worked for me.
The 1/3 -2/3 is a rule of thumb and a good starting point. I carry 0# to 4# on a belt, depending on my config. The rest is carried on my back. (plate,steel tank, upper cam straps).
Weight placement depends on a several factors.