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View Full Version : Taking AOW course with unconventional (tech) set-up



snoballz
08-05-2008, 23:05
OK, so this will be how my rig will set-up. My primary reg will have a 5' hose. I will then take the standard hose that came with the primary reg and use it for my octo, effectively shortening the hose on the octo, which will then be necklaced.

Now here is the dilemma if you will. I am taking my AOW course through a LDS in a few weeks. My rig will almost be tech/DIR in terms of the length of hoses and necklaced octo. I am also donning a harness and wing, albeit purchased through the LDS.

Will there be any backlash? I am not sure how open minded certain instructors, LDS, etc are in terms of set-up. I am a bit concerned that I will be asked to set my rig to a more conventional (i.e. recreational) set-up.

:smiley16:

hooligan
08-05-2008, 23:18
If they want your business they should keep their mouths shut and let you use whatever setup you like as long as it's safe. Will that actually occur? Who knows, but that's the way it should be.

Ryanh1801
08-05-2008, 23:25
I had a few questions asked about my rig, when doing my NAUI AOW and master diver course. But all in all it was fine. I just made sure to explain to my dive buddy everything on my rig and how things would be deployed in an OOA situation. Now doing the in water rescues in that rig were intresting. I got strangled a few times from my reg neckless.

Vercingetorix
08-06-2008, 08:52
I did NAUI AOW using a BP/W. My octo was not on a necklace at that time; it was on my right-shoulder D-ring. My instructor did not hassle me.

I advise that you DO NOT use the standard hose for the necklaced octo. If you bring it over your right shoulder, it is a huge halo and just ripe for snagging. Your can route it under your right arm, but it still sticks out a bit. Suggest you move octo to a 22-inch hose; no halo.

mitsuguy
08-06-2008, 09:10
So long as your rig has all the basic safety features, there shouldn't be a problem at all... if there is, then you have a closed minded instructor...

On my way to being an instructor myself, I think the only time I would care if someone showed up in a BP/W with a long hose setup would be if it were for the OW checkouts... I would likely be very hesitant and ask a WHOLE LOT of questions... but for AOW, it's not going to matter...

crgjpg
08-06-2008, 09:54
I dont think that it should be a problem. With PADI, there were no drills or anything that would require a certain set up. I think the main issue, which you plan to handle, is letting your buddy know about your set up and what to do. When ever I dive with someone diffrent, I let them know about my set up. I have a Zeagle BC and have come across buddies that are not familiar with the ripcord system.

MicahEW
08-06-2008, 09:56
OK, so this will be how my rig will set-up. My primary reg will have a 5' hose. I will then take the standard hose that came with the primary reg and use it for my octo, effectively shortening the hose on the octo, which will then be necklaced.

Now here is the dilemma if you will. I am taking my AOW course through a LDS in a few weeks. My rig will almost be tech/DIR in terms of the length of hoses and necklaced octo. I am also donning a harness and wing, albeit purchased through the LDS.

Will there be any backlash? I am not sure how open minded certain instructors, LDS, etc are in terms of set-up. I am a bit concerned that I will be asked to set my rig to a more conventional (i.e. recreational) set-up.

:smiley16:



a 5' hose what is that for?

No Misses
08-06-2008, 10:05
[/quote] a 5' hose what is that for?[/quote]

Well, since there is no smiley face next to the question, I will assume that it is an honest one. The 5' hose gets routed down your back - crossing under the right arm - diagonally across your chest - around the back of your neck - into your mouth. When sharing air, just hand them your primary. Duck your head and deploy all 5' of hose. This will get the other diver out of your face. Grab your octo that is bungied at your neck and breath.
The 5' hose is an open water adaptation of the "cave rigged" 7' hose. The reason for a 7' hose is so that you and your air sharing buddy can swim single file through small openings.
I hope this helps.

MicahEW
08-06-2008, 10:09
a 5' hose what is that for?[/quote]

Well, since there is no smiley face next to the question, I will assume that it is an honest one. The 5' hose gets routed down your back - crossing under the right arm - diagonally across your chest - around the back of your neck - into your mouth. When sharing air, just hand them your primary. Duck your head and deploy all 5' of hose. This will get the other diver out of your face. Grab your octo that is bungied at your neck and breath.
The 5' hose is an open water adaptation of the "cave rigged" 7' hose. The reason for a 7' hose is so that you and your air sharing buddy can swim single file through small openings.
I hope this helps.[/quote]

yup it does thank you..

IndyDiver
08-06-2008, 10:38
My kids just did the open water dives for their PADI OW class last weekend. They had 40" primaries with zeagle elbows routed under the right arm and short hose bungied secondaries. There were no problems at all using this config for the class and only a passing comment about the "odd" setup by one of the DM's. In fact, all of the rental equipment for the LDS has BCD inflators with integrated secondaries, so all of the OOA drills worked the same for everyone - donate your primary and then use your secondary for yourself. The only difference was, everyone with the rental equipment had trouble with the standard 28" primary hose and the "S" curve needed in the hose when you donate. Between the 40" hose and the swivel elbow that allows the primary to be turned around to face the OOA diver, their drills went much easier.

CompuDude
08-06-2008, 11:32
Let's put it like this:

If there IS any backlash, I would look into training with another dive shop. Make sense? That said, if the LDS in question actually sold you a bp/w, I highly doubt there will be any problem, since they must have at least something of a tech leaning if they're selling that gear.

I do, however, agree with V's point above. You're going to want a shorter hose on your secondary reg.

snoballz
08-06-2008, 12:45
Thanks for the feedback.

I'll speak to them beforehand since I don't want any surprises. The LDS had to special order the Apeks stuff since they do not carry it. I explained why I wanted the set-up since they softly pushed the SQ and AL BC's on hand. I believe they relented since Apeks is in the AL line of products.

They frowned when I first stated my search and planned on getting a Zeagle Ranger.

So, the shorter hose from my primary is still too long for the octo? That is what I meant about standard hose if that caused any confusion.

Thanks again!

:smiley16:

woody
08-06-2008, 14:04
Simple and easy answer is train like you dive!
Itís almost pointless to pay for training that will not improve your skills and comfort level s in your dive gear. You will defiantly have to teach your dive buddy about your gear setup and your OOG procedures. I would suggest that you walk through it a few times on land and not to try to teach them in the water.
Who knows it might make some others to start thinking about the long hose and BP/W setups.

medic001918
08-06-2008, 15:54
So long as your rig has all the basic safety features, there shouldn't be a problem at all... if there is, then you have a closed minded instructor...

On my way to being an instructor myself, I think the only time I would care if someone showed up in a BP/W with a long hose setup would be if it were for the OW checkouts... I would likely be very hesitant and ask a WHOLE LOT of questions... but for AOW, it's not going to matter...

Not sure why you'd be hesitant. When my wife got into diving we talked about the different rig configurations and she did her OW course in a BP/W and a long hose regulator set up. She wasn't the only one in her class doing so, but the shop she took it fully endorses the setup for all levels of diving.

As a consumer, I might be concerned with you as an instructor if you got that concerned over this style of setup. It's not that unpopular and in my area, more people dive with it than not. Ask a couple of questions or even have them demonstrate that they know how to use it...sure. Asking a "WHOLE LOT of questions" is something else and could lead to me questioning your experience (not saying you're inexperienced, but saying it could be perceived as such). Not everyone taking an OW scuba course is starting with zero knowledge. My wife and I went over all kinds of gear and such before she ever stepped into a dive shop. As long as the student knows how to use the gear properly, and can brief their buddy as such...there's no reason for it to be a concern.

To the OP, if the hassle you about (which I doubt they will)...I'd consider taking the course elsewhere. You're using a safe rig with all the required gear. There's no reason for them to hassle you.

Shane

pir8
08-06-2008, 16:28
I want you to take any class from me in the rig that you are going to be using normally. That way you're going to be more comfortable during the class and just do better.

3rdEye
08-06-2008, 16:40
i don't know why it would be a problem....some of my instructors used bp&w's for teaching our OW class....AOW class should be pretty much gear setup agnostic

texdiveguy
08-06-2008, 16:41
OK, so this will be how my rig will set-up. My primary reg will have a 5' hose. I will then take the standard hose that came with the primary reg and use it for my octo, effectively shortening the hose on the octo, which will then be necklaced.

Now here is the dilemma if you will. I am taking my AOW course through a LDS in a few weeks. My rig will almost be tech/DIR in terms of the length of hoses and necklaced octo. I am also donning a harness and wing, albeit purchased through the LDS.

Will there be any backlash? I am not sure how open minded certain instructors, LDS, etc are in terms of set-up. I am a bit concerned that I will be asked to set my rig to a more conventional (i.e. recreational) set-up.

:smiley16:

Very simple.... if the LDS has issues with your rig just find another shop/instructor who as the sense to understand the benefits of your basic configuration.....you might think about a shorter alt. second stage hose (22-26"). Good luck.

mitsuguy
08-06-2008, 17:05
So long as your rig has all the basic safety features, there shouldn't be a problem at all... if there is, then you have a closed minded instructor...

On my way to being an instructor myself, I think the only time I would care if someone showed up in a BP/W with a long hose setup would be if it were for the OW checkouts... I would likely be very hesitant and ask a WHOLE LOT of questions... but for AOW, it's not going to matter...

Not sure why you'd be hesitant. When my wife got into diving we talked about the different rig configurations and she did her OW course in a BP/W and a long hose regulator set up. She wasn't the only one in her class doing so, but the shop she took it fully endorses the setup for all levels of diving.

As a consumer, I might be concerned with you as an instructor if you got that concerned over this style of setup. It's not that unpopular and in my area, more people dive with it than not. Ask a couple of questions or even have them demonstrate that they know how to use it...sure. Asking a "WHOLE LOT of questions" is something else and could lead to me questioning your experience (not saying you're inexperienced, but saying it could be perceived as such). Not everyone taking an OW scuba course is starting with zero knowledge. My wife and I went over all kinds of gear and such before she ever stepped into a dive shop. As long as the student knows how to use the gear properly, and can brief their buddy as such...there's no reason for it to be a concern.

To the OP, if the hassle you about (which I doubt they will)...I'd consider taking the course elsewhere. You're using a safe rig with all the required gear. There's no reason for them to hassle you.

Shane

The reason I would ask is that an OW course is typically someones very first entry into SCUBA... Most people know little to nothing about it prior to the course, and the course is the eye opener that "oh my god, there is so much to learn"

For that same reason, a number of people do not have gear for their OW course, nor really should they already have their own gear... (what if they don't like it or just simply can't)

The reason I would be asking questions would be to find out if that new diver was truly a new diver, had relatives in diving, or whatnot that led them to get that type of gear already. It would easily distinguish the semi-experienced newbie from the "I read about it online and bought it" person, which may or may not have experience, good or bad...

I have nothing wrong with the tech/dir gear configuration, but there is zero reason someone should have that gear going into a basic OW course... I'm not sure of ANY agency that teaches that gear config in a truly basic course, so it's hard to comprehend why someone would already know how to use it when they had never been diving...

But again, that's what the questions are for - to distinguish someone that has been diving uncertified before, or someone that has read about it and thinks they already know...

CompuDude
08-06-2008, 17:35
So long as your rig has all the basic safety features, there shouldn't be a problem at all... if there is, then you have a closed minded instructor...

On my way to being an instructor myself, I think the only time I would care if someone showed up in a BP/W with a long hose setup would be if it were for the OW checkouts... I would likely be very hesitant and ask a WHOLE LOT of questions... but for AOW, it's not going to matter...

Not sure why you'd be hesitant. When my wife got into diving we talked about the different rig configurations and she did her OW course in a BP/W and a long hose regulator set up. She wasn't the only one in her class doing so, but the shop she took it fully endorses the setup for all levels of diving.

As a consumer, I might be concerned with you as an instructor if you got that concerned over this style of setup. It's not that unpopular and in my area, more people dive with it than not. Ask a couple of questions or even have them demonstrate that they know how to use it...sure. Asking a "WHOLE LOT of questions" is something else and could lead to me questioning your experience (not saying you're inexperienced, but saying it could be perceived as such). Not everyone taking an OW scuba course is starting with zero knowledge. My wife and I went over all kinds of gear and such before she ever stepped into a dive shop. As long as the student knows how to use the gear properly, and can brief their buddy as such...there's no reason for it to be a concern.

To the OP, if the hassle you about (which I doubt they will)...I'd consider taking the course elsewhere. You're using a safe rig with all the required gear. There's no reason for them to hassle you.

Shane

The reason I would ask is that an OW course is typically someones very first entry into SCUBA... Most people know little to nothing about it prior to the course, and the course is the eye opener that "oh my god, there is so much to learn"

For that same reason, a number of people do not have gear for their OW course, nor really should they already have their own gear... (what if they don't like it or just simply can't)

The reason I would be asking questions would be to find out if that new diver was truly a new diver, had relatives in diving, or whatnot that led them to get that type of gear already. It would easily distinguish the semi-experienced newbie from the "I read about it online and bought it" person, which may or may not have experience, good or bad...

I have nothing wrong with the tech/dir gear configuration, but there is zero reason someone should have that gear going into a basic OW course... I'm not sure of ANY agency that teaches that gear config in a truly basic course, so it's hard to comprehend why someone would already know how to use it when they had never been diving...

But again, that's what the questions are for - to distinguish someone that has been diving uncertified before, or someone that has read about it and thinks they already know...

There is no agency (that I know of, and definitely not PADI, since lots of research has been done on that front) that actually prohibits using a DIR gear setup for OW. The only condition is the mandatory inclusion of the snorkel, at least for PADI. :smiley11: Doing gear swaps can be a little more complicated, if the other student (or the instructor!) has no familiarity with a bp/w and long hose rig, but other than that, there really is no reason why not to use one, as far as the agencies are concerned.

We're only talking about OW here. Since AOW doesn't really get into the basic gear, it really shouldn't matter what you wear, as long as it's safe gear that you know how to use. AOW is more about diving than learning basic gear stuff. (with the possibly exception of PPB, which gets into gear a little more)

medic001918
08-06-2008, 18:31
AOW is more about diving than learning basic gear stuff. (with the possibly exception of PPB, which gets into gear a little more)

The shop I took my PPB course at would only allow you to take it in a BP/W. But then again, they are a heavy tech oriented shop and also a GUE shop. Most people who had been diving jacket's ended up owning a BP/W by the end of the PPB course that we took. The course wasn't the traditional PADI version though. It was a six week course that covered a lot of equipment adjustment (to ensure it's proper function) and a ton of pool work. I can honestly say that it was the best class we've taken in regards to improving our diving.

Shane

CompuDude
08-06-2008, 18:37
AOW is more about diving than learning basic gear stuff. (with the possibly exception of PPB, which gets into gear a little more)

The shop I took my PPB course at would only allow you to take it in a BP/W. But then again, they are a heavy tech oriented shop and also a GUE shop. Most people who had been diving jacket's ended up owning a BP/W by the end of the PPB course that we took. The course wasn't the traditional PADI version though. It was a six week course that covered a lot of equipment adjustment (to ensure it's proper function) and a ton of pool work. I can honestly say that it was the best class we've taken in regards to improving our diving.

Wow, sounds like a great PPB course! Way better than the typical PADI PPB course. What shop?

medic001918
08-06-2008, 20:52
Scuba Shack in Rocky Hill, Connecticut. The level of control we learned in the course was fantastic. They actually require you to take the course before you move on with them beyond OW. I always thought it was kind of a way to get people to spend more money in the shop, but the leaps that divers make by taking the course is incredible and the money is well worth it. One of the nice things with the shop is that once you take a course once, you can sit it on it again anytime you want for free. They're feeling is that you've "already paid for it." My wife and I were both skeptical about taking the course at first, but by the end both of us were pleased with our progress and what we learned about our gear, our control and our propulsion in the water. Every class was video'd and at the end watching the first class compared to the last class was awesome.

Shane

snoballz
08-06-2008, 21:28
Hey, Vercingetorix, CompuDude, and texdiveguy, you all mentioned I should get a shorter octo hose (since it will be necklaced). My plan is to take the existing hose from the primary and use that as the octo hose, effectively shortening it. I believe the standard length of the primary hose on the ST1 is about 26". Think that is short enough to avoid halo effect?

I'm ordering my Miflex primary hose from ST shortly. I have to see about getting an adapter since Miflex aren't compatible out of the box.

Thanks again.

:smiley16:

CompuDude
08-07-2008, 12:36
Hey, Vercingetorix, CompuDude, and texdiveguy, you all mentioned I should get a shorter octo hose (since it will be necklaced). My plan is to take the existing hose from the primary and use that as the octo hose, effectively shortening it. I believe the standard length of the primary hose on the ST1 is about 26". Think that is short enough to avoid halo effect?

I'm ordering my Miflex primary hose from ST shortly. I have to see about getting an adapter since Miflex aren't compatible out of the box.

If you have to buy a new hose anyway, why not just get the right size to begin with? It's not a huge amount of money, after all.

For a necklaced secondary, 22" is pretty standard. A few people use 24", but 22" is far more common. So 26" would certainly be better than a standard 30" reg hose, but it's still a little longer than optimal. You may find it slips down your shoulder more than you'd like.

MSilvia
08-07-2008, 12:45
I have nothing wrong with the tech/dir gear configuration, but there is zero reason someone should have that gear going into a basic OW course...
Despite assertions to the contrary, there's nothing tech or DIR about the configuration the OP described, although it could be used that way in the future if appropriate changes were made. It sounds to me like a recreational backplate and wing setup with a long hose. I don't see why that would be any less appropriate for OW than any other BC.

I don't get how anyone who understood what tech diving was could mistake an OW diver with a single yoke reg and no redundant gas supply for a tech diver, much less how folks reach the conclusion that backplate + longhose = DIR.

snoballz
08-07-2008, 13:51
I don't get how anyone who understood what tech diving was could mistake an OW diver with a single yoke reg and no redundant gas supply for a tech diver, much less how folks reach the conclusion that backplate + longhose = DIR.

I agree but that is unfortunately the stereotype that if you are not donning a jacket BC and have a standard hose reg and octo attached to your BC, you are outside the norm and considered incorrectly DIR, tech, or other in the "general" diving community.

:smiley16:

snoballz
08-07-2008, 13:54
If you have to buy a new hose anyway, why not just get the right size to begin with? It's not a huge amount of money, after all.

I just can't let go of the comfort swivel on the Atomic hose and want to reuse it one way or another. I figured I paid for it and I don't want to get rid of it only having it for a couple of months. I know eventually, I'll let go but for now....

Secondly, um, I already place the order for the primary Miflex hose along with other stuff on ST last night. :smiley17:

:smiley16:

russp
08-07-2008, 14:05
I did my open water last season and will be doing AOW this weekend with my primary regulator on a standard hose and a Zeagle octo/inflator as my secondary. Neither my OW or AOW instructors have any problem with this as long as I am able to demonstrate the proper procedure for an out of air emergency with my rig.

IndyDiver
08-07-2008, 15:14
I don't get how anyone who understood what tech diving was could mistake an OW diver with a single yoke reg and no redundant gas supply for a tech diver, much less how folks reach the conclusion that backplate + longhose = DIR.

I agree but that is unfortunately the stereotype that if you are not donning a jacket BC and have a standard hose reg and octo attached to your BC, you are outside the norm and considered incorrectly DIR, tech, or other in the "general" diving community.
:smiley16:

OK, I am outside the "general norm" in my equipment setup. but no one who knows anything about DIR or Tech diving could confuse me with someone doing either of those. I am diving a back inflate BC (Brigade), with a single steel HP100, my primary is on a 44" hose under my arm with an elbow on the reg, my secondary is bungied with a 22" hose, and I just got a 19cf pony bottle for it.

However, my LDS has no standards or consistancy in the "normal" gear they use for their OW classes. In the class that my kids were in and the class that was right before theirs I saw the following: Regular octos clipped somewhere on the chest, inflator integrated octos, back inflate BCs, jacket BCs, two different styles of integrated weights, and one plain weight belt. Some of these variences (i.e. integrated vs. belt weights and integrated vs. traditional octos) have a direct impact on the methods learned and practiced in the class. And all of the above equipment is sold by the shop.

So, if the shop has any problem with your setup, ask them how it will negatively affect the instruction in the class. If they just don't like it because it is DIR or Tech or just "Different", well then - People who live in glass houses...

in_cavediver
08-07-2008, 17:03
I don't get how anyone who understood what tech diving was could mistake an OW diver with a single yoke reg and no redundant gas supply for a tech diver, much less how folks reach the conclusion that backplate + longhose = DIR.

I agree but that is unfortunately the stereotype that if you are not donning a jacket BC and have a standard hose reg and octo attached to your BC, you are outside the norm and considered incorrectly DIR, tech, or other in the "general" diving community.

:smiley16:

Wow, I now know how to describe myself in the diving world - OTHER!:smiley36:

Makes want to make my wife get her AOW - in sidemount!

skdvr
08-07-2008, 17:11
Makes want to make my wife get her AOW - in sidemount!

I would love to see the Instructors face when she started setting up her gear:smilie39:

That would be great.....

Phil

mitsuguy
08-08-2008, 08:24
I have nothing wrong with the tech/dir gear configuration, but there is zero reason someone should have that gear going into a basic OW course...
Despite assertions to the contrary, there's nothing tech or DIR about the configuration the OP described, although it could be used that way in the future if appropriate changes were made. It sounds to me like a recreational backplate and wing setup with a long hose. I don't see why that would be any less appropriate for OW than any other BC.

I don't get how anyone who understood what tech diving was could mistake an OW diver with a single yoke reg and no redundant gas supply for a tech diver, much less how folks reach the conclusion that backplate + longhose = DIR.

My concern was the "wannabe's" I even see it here on the board at times...

to me, it's the equivalent of showing up at drivers ed with a Formula 1 car... something that a newbie should have zero experience with in terms of gear setup, but they are showing up with relatively advanced equipment... and if you say it's not advanced, then why is it not taught as a standard gear config??? It may not be any more advanced than a standard setup, but it is definitely different in terms of gear location...

everyone here is preaching "so long as you know what to do in an OOA situation with your rig" which is fine, but when I said in OW I would question it - may be relative, as I've been doing DM stuff recently, I see what people in their OW course know - absolutely nothing - If I walked up to one that had been through the academics portion, but not the pool stuff, but we had set up their gear, and said "I'm out of air, give me your alternate" I would say 9 out of 10 would stumble...

typically, in OW, people do not have any experience at all, so how are they going to manage an OOA situation with zero diving experience?

MSilvia
08-08-2008, 09:51
to me, it's the equivalent of showing up at drivers ed with a Formula 1 car... something that a newbie should have zero experience with in terms of gear setup, but they are showing up with relatively advanced equipment...
If they showed up with manifolded doubles, a stage bottle, SMB and reel, I'd agree, but the BP/W is just a BC. It's not "advanced gear", it's just gear that will let you do advanced stuff if you're so inclined. As for the Formula 1 analogy, I think it's a lot closer to the truth to say it's the equivalent of someone showing up for driver's ed in a Toyota Camry, and the instructor being concerned because that's the same car they reconfigure for NASCAR races, and he's used to teaching people in SUVs.

and if you say it's not advanced, then why is it not taught as a standard gear config???
It is taught as a standard gear config... but not by you apparently. Just to play devil's advocate though, using the same logic buoyancy control must be an advanced skill, since it isn't taught in many OW classes.

It might be unusual gear for resort divers, but BP/W is very common up here. I frequently dive with OW and AOW divers who use it, and it's not at all uncommon to be on a recreational boat charter where the majority of the divers aboard are using it. I can think of several local shops that not only carry BP/Ws, but carry a variety of models from different manufacturers.

That said, while I think BP/W is appropriate for OW divers, I agree that they shouldn't be showing up with a long hose and necklace unless their instructor directed them to. Of course AOW is another matter entirely.

mitsuguy
08-08-2008, 12:33
I see your point, and maybe I exaggerated a little, but in the past 6 months of going to the lake with OW students (we really just tag along to get the close campsite to the water), I have not seen one single student in a BP/W or long hose setup... We are not in a resort area - san antonio, tx... But it may be different in your part of the woods... I also guess the reason I thought of the OP's setup as a tech style setup was because that is indeed the title of this thread... Either way, I have been in many dive shops and none have had rental bp/w's for class... And trust me I entirely understand why some would want the option, I have just never seen it in real life...

MSilvia
08-08-2008, 13:03
trust me I entirely understand why some would want the option, I have just never seen it in real life...
I do think it's interesting how the availability and popularity varies regionally. Aside from tech diving communities where you'd expect to see them, like around the florida cave systems, it seems to me like they're embraced most enthusiasticly by cold water divers. I know they're popular around here, and I understand the Pacific Northwest has a disproportionally large number of BP/W divers too.

Either way, I don't see them nearly as often when I travel to dive.

RoyN
08-08-2008, 14:10
I usually just borrow my instructor's BC and reg for simple use because sometimes we do drills and etc. But I think the tech course WILL have me in and out of my backplate and etc.

medic001918
08-08-2008, 14:53
I see your point, and maybe I exaggerated a little, but in the past 6 months of going to the lake with OW students (we really just tag along to get the close campsite to the water), I have not seen one single student in a BP/W or long hose setup... We are not in a resort area - san antonio, tx... But it may be different in your part of the woods... I also guess the reason I thought of the OP's setup as a tech style setup was because that is indeed the title of this thread... Either way, I have been in many dive shops and none have had rental bp/w's for class... And trust me I entirely understand why some would want the option, I have just never seen it in real life...

My shop rents bp/w rigs and regs with long hoses. It's not at all uncommon to find these set ups in their ow classes either. It's a widely accepted configuration up here.

Shane

MSilvia
08-08-2008, 14:55
It's a widely accepted configuration up here.

Up where? Your profile just says "United States".

texdiveguy
08-08-2008, 14:56
I see a number of recreational divers in our area over the past 2 years going to a back inflate bc or bp/w with long hose configurations....pretty sweet in my mind.

medic001918
08-09-2008, 15:38
It's a widely accepted configuration up here.

Up where? Your profile just says "United States".

Sorry...thought it was updated and current. But I live in Connecticut.

Shane

Splitlip
08-09-2008, 16:03
Well, that setup is certainly only a "tech" setup.

I did my 2nd AOW in an "unconventional" rig. No problema.