PDA

View Full Version : Scubatoys intensive training?



JugglingMonkeys
08-12-2007, 21:06
does ST ever do a several day intensive training?

that some of us from other states could come for and do in one go?

ScubaToys Larry
08-12-2007, 21:20
Our open water classes are a 2 weekend format (unless doing a private class... then you tell us when you want to go!) We give people the book, DVD, and even the final exam which you do as a take home test. Then we bring the folks in Saturday morning and grade the test, talk about any missed questions, and add any additional info we want you to know. Then a lunch break, then into our pool. We spend the rest of the day in the pool doing skills, then back on Sunday for more pool time. If we need any additional academics, we might hit an hour or two in the class - but really, people learn to scuba dive in the water, not in a class.

Then when all the skills are good, we give you a little goof off, practice, play time. The following weekend we do our checkout dives.

So that's our structure for open water.

Advanced is a one night class, then down to Lake Travis for the check out dives. I believe we had about 20 folks diving Travis this weekend. We sent, I think, 3 instructors and a whole slew of DM's on this one. I bet it was a fun weekend, and I'm sure we'll get some reports soon!

JugglingMonkeys
08-12-2007, 21:24
Thanks Larry!

Illini_Fan
08-12-2007, 21:33
Advanced is a one night class, then down to Lake Travis for the check out dives. I believe we had about 20 folks diving Travis this weekend. We sent, I think, 3 instructors and a whole slew of DM's on this one. I bet it was a fun weekend, and I'm sure we'll get some reports soon!

Well, a report from Lake Travis this weekend --- it was HOT.

The night dive was a slight cluster with that many bodies, but we all made it back, so it was a good dive. Visibility wasn't ideal, but i enjoyed the dives. Of particular benefit was the navigation dive and the refresher on the tables. Also, great lesson on SAC rates -- I need to download my dives and run some math.

JugglingMonkeys
08-13-2007, 09:26
why not do a training that would not be formal or certification-related.

just have instructors available for people to come and dive for several days straight - in a nice location - and work on whatever they need for their knowledge, technique. Sort of a consulting, coaching thing - in a group.

Charge for it, of course.

i would come - schedule permitting...

rfreddo
08-13-2007, 11:22
Sorry to keep going back to the skydiving analogies, but having been involved in the training side of that sport for many many years, and just getting into scuba, I see many analogies. I like JugglingMonkeys suggestion about a coaching program. This was found to be so effective in the skydiving community that it actually became official a few years back. Now, in addition to issuing instructor ratings, the governing organization issues a "coach" rating. Coaches do exactly what JugglingMonkeys describes. One of the coach's roles is to take newly certified skydivers to the point where they are not only self-sufficient and safe, but comfortable skydivers. It's nice for the newbies to know that there is a group of people with a little more training and experience that they can turn to for help whenever they feel that they need it. Much less pressure (and much more consistent results) than just asking "joe experienced skydiver" for tips.

I am a very firm believer in giving back, and love programs that recognize, and organize, those willing to spend time with newbies to ensure that our pastimes stay safe and enjoyable.

ertechsg
08-13-2007, 12:46
Yea what Tom said. :smiley36: Class and people were a blast vis was way less than ideal but made nav a little more interesting. It was hot but the hotel was nice at night. ALL AND ALL A GREAT TIME. THANKS TO ALL THE INSTUCTORS AND DM'S:smiley20:

TxHockeyGuy
08-13-2007, 13:08
Sorry to keep going back to the skydiving analogies, but having been involved in the training side of that sport for many many years, and just getting into scuba, I see many analogies. I like JugglingMonkeys suggestion about a coaching program. This was found to be so effective in the skydiving community that it actually became official a few years back. Now, in addition to issuing instructor ratings, the governing organization issues a "coach" rating. Coaches do exactly what JugglingMonkeys describes. One of the coach's roles is to take newly certified skydivers to the point where they are not only self-sufficient and safe, but comfortable skydivers. It's nice for the newbies to know that there is a group of people with a little more training and experience that they can turn to for help whenever they feel that they need it. Much less pressure (and much more consistent results) than just asking "joe experienced skydiver" for tips.

I am a very firm believer in giving back, and love programs that recognize, and organize, those willing to spend time with newbies to ensure that our pastimes stay safe and enjoyable.

In diving they call them Dive Masters. Sounds like sorta the same thing to me.

Honestly it sounds to me like what everyone wants is pretty similar to the NAUI master diver certification.

JugglingMonkeys
08-13-2007, 14:01
Sorry to keep going back to the skydiving analogies, but having been involved in the training side of that sport for many many years, and just getting into scuba, I see many analogies. I like JugglingMonkeys suggestion about a coaching program. This was found to be so effective in the skydiving community that it actually became official a few years back. Now, in addition to issuing instructor ratings, the governing organization issues a "coach" rating. Coaches do exactly what JugglingMonkeys describes. One of the coach's roles is to take newly certified skydivers to the point where they are not only self-sufficient and safe, but comfortable skydivers. It's nice for the newbies to know that there is a group of people with a little more training and experience that they can turn to for help whenever they feel that they need it. Much less pressure (and much more consistent results) than just asking "joe experienced skydiver" for tips.

I am a very firm believer in giving back, and love programs that recognize, and organize, those willing to spend time with newbies to ensure that our pastimes stay safe and enjoyable.


this is exactly what i'm suggesting!

porsche060
08-13-2007, 14:06
Wish they would make their advanced classes the day before so out of towners to could in for a nice weekend

dallasdivergirl
08-14-2007, 12:43
I think one good thing about the size of last week's AOW class was that it taught me to not be totally dependant on a DM or Instructor for direction of what to do and try working on some dive planning of my own.

Also that I can depend on my buddy and on myself.

Vercingetorix
08-14-2007, 12:58
Sorry to keep going back to the skydiving analogies, ... newly certified skydivers to the point where they are not only self-sufficient and safe, but comfortable skydivers. There's certification for skydivers now? Excellent. Back when I was actively jumping, the training was:
1. Here's two hours of training
2. Here's your chute
3. There's your plane (Cessna 185)
4. Jump

rfreddo
08-14-2007, 13:40
You were overtrained Vercingetorix. With the advent of tandem skydiving, it goes more like this:

1. Here's a half hour video
2. Here's your JM
3. There's your plane (twin otter in most cases)
4. Hang on!

Oh yeah. Almost forgot about step 5. Smile pretty for the camera so we can post it on the DZ's website and entice another 50 first timers for next weekend at $300+ a pop. It's a shame that just as the sport was going mainstream it also became so commercialized. I too sometimes long for the days of the belly wart, a nice big round overhead and a crunch at the end of the ride. On second thought, maybe all that commercialization and the advances it's brought to the equipment side isn't that bad after all. Oh well. Still some pretty good memories.

Vercingetorix
08-14-2007, 15:13
You were overtrained Vercingetorix. With the advent of tandem skydiving, it goes more like this:

1. Here's a half hour video
2. Here's your JM
3. There's your plane (twin otter in most cases)
4. Hang on!Wow...just...wow.What rig did you jump with? Mine was a 7-TU mod surplus chute (considered a hot rig at the time). I would drool over the ParaCommander, but as a college student, I didn't have the cash for it. ParaSail was just hitting the market, but was considered too hot for anybody but the most experienced jumpers.

rfreddo
08-14-2007, 15:38
My first 50-60 jumps were on a vented P-78, a 28' round. Never had to use the reserve. Ironically, about 10 jumps after I switched to a Strato Cloud Delta (200 or so sft 7 cell) I had to use my reserve - a 24 foot, unvented round and that landing hurt like you wouldn't believe. These days the kids are jumping tiny little 9 cells with wing loadings upwards of 2:1 and scaring the bejesus out of me when they come whizzing by.