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mrbheagney
09-03-2008, 17:32
Stonefish, Scorpionfish, Cone Shells, Octopus, Soapfish, Triggerfish, Squirrelfish, Surgeonfish, Unicornfish, Sea Snakes, Sharks, Rays and even the humble Rabbitfish. Most critters have some way to defend themselves so if you have been stung, stabbed, bitten, poisoned or otherwise injured by our marine friend tell us here or just discuss any animals defensive attributes.

Warren
09-03-2008, 17:36
:smilie40:

Yeah! Nice topic!

Vegas
09-03-2008, 17:42
Good topic! I like it!
I've (thank heavens) have, as of yet, remained uninjured in such a fashion.

I did do a little research on the Pacific Electric Ray after encountering a rather large one out near Anacapa. I was most impressed with it's complete lack of concern about the divers hovering around it, and it's "I own the ocean" attitude - LOL! (I have been taught that if it acts like it owns the ocean...there's a reason!)....I read a couple of accounts where
divers were actually chased by these guys! Wow.

mrbheagney
09-03-2008, 18:02
I have had one scary encounter with the Giant Black Blotched Reef Ray Taeniura meyeni. I encountered the animal at 30 meters n(110ft) under an overhang at a dive site called Eden Rock in Ha'apai. I had my camera and began to take a few shots, edging closer each time as it was only the compact and results from distance are rubbish generally. The Ray did not take kindly to my approach however, lifted off the sand and proceeded to swim directly towards me as it convulsed it body seeming spitting through it spiracles (water intakes behind the eye). I was out of there straight away. This particular animal had a disc over 1.5 meters and they can grow up to 2 meters. Deaths have been recorded from this species. In one instance a diver took it for a Manta and tried to hitch a ride, which is a stupid thing to do anyway, the ray defended itself accordingly. I have the video of its reaction and will try to upload but the connection here is crap so it is unlikely I can share it with you lot. Please remember to act responsibly with marine animals, their environment is a dangerous place and they have evolved to defend themselves well. This is a picture of a Porcupine Ray Urgogymnus asperrimus illustrating the spiracle, this species lacks the venomous spine which permitted the shot from behind like this. The Manta also lacks a sting and the Eagle Ray may have one to five spines near the base of its tail.

DiverD66
09-21-2008, 10:11
Thanks for the great topic!! Being new to diving, I'm always looking for info on the do's and esp. the don'ts! I'll be sure to post if I should have any encounters so that I can pass on my info too! I think we just need to remember it's their world too!!
Happy Bubbling!:smiley20:

IrishSquid
09-21-2008, 11:08
Thanks for the great topic!! Being new to diving, I'm always looking for info on the do's and esp. the don'ts! I'll be sure to post if I should have any encounters so that I can pass on my info too! I think we just need to remember it's their world too!!
Happy Bubbling!:smiley20:

I read somewhere that if it is ugly, pretty, small, big, fast, or slow, don't mess with it because it is probably dangerous, poisonous, mean, or illegal.
Then be careful of the ones you don't see.

warscout2
09-21-2008, 23:33
I would say one of the best defensive strategies is to have good buoyancy control. This will keep you off of the bottom and away from many of the baddies

BouzoukiJoe A.K.A. wrecker130 AKA Chuck Norris AKA joeforbroke (banned)
09-21-2008, 23:50
As a general rule -- if it's not afraid of you don't touch it. And yes, buoyancy control is key. I've had plenty of chances to crash into sharks and lion fish and who knows what on the bottom.

Daz
09-21-2008, 23:57
As a general rule -- if it's not afraid of you don't touch it.

While that's not a bad rule, IMNSHO, a better one is to just not touch it either way.