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View Full Version : Moray Eels - Family Muraenidae



mrbheagney
09-03-2008, 17:44
From the Giant Moray to the Blue Ribbon Eel the Maray Eels are always nice to see on the reef. Some are approachable others very shy and purely nocturnal. It is a rare treat to see on free swimming as they are normally holed up in a crevice with just the head visible. Their gaping mouths full of rows of jagged teeth look threatening but the opening and closing is simply the animal drawing water over its gills to breathe. They often have a company of cleaner shrimps who spend the day removing pieces of flesh from between the teeth after a nights feeding. If you should get bitten by one the recommendation is to keep your hand steady as the animal will have to open its mouth to breathe at which point you can then remove your hand. I reckon you would have to have a pretty cool head to do that. Most people tear away instinctively and as the teeth point backwards to prevent the escape to their normal prey you get a very nasty wound which can become infected because of the aforementioned rotting flesh between the teeth. They love to eat octopus and if the octopus grabs the eel in battle the eel ties a not in its body and runs it along the body towards the head removing the octopus' grip, cool or what? Pictured in the Orange Margin Moray Eel Gymnothorax flavimarginatus with his full compliment of Hingeback Cleaner Shrimps Rhynchocinetes durbanensis

NeveSSL
09-04-2008, 21:56
I'm hoping to get a blue ribbon eel one day if I can find one that will eat. :) They are gorgeous! Very neat animals.

Brandon

mrbheagney
09-06-2008, 03:00
They feed on fish in the wild and my books have them listed as a very delicate aquarium fish. Tons of em in Indo. Only one reported sighting in Tonga and they are generally uncommon on oceanic islands.

mrbheagney
09-06-2008, 04:40
This is a really nice one called the Fimbrated Moray, Gymnothorax fimbratus. Check out the fangs. This is a nocturnal species but I have located it in the same den on several occassions. Really beautifully coloured species with the green fading into cream white in the body with blotches and bars all over.

I love you Sabine

Aussie
09-07-2008, 04:21
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2280/2829824660_074c24a7e7.jpg

Abbott's Moray

DevilDiver
09-07-2008, 08:23
Chain Moray (Echidna catenata)
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2136/2269843907_709c21f2ea.jpg

Chain Moray (Echidna catenata)
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2167/2269845091_006f4e13f0.jpg

freeski4ever
09-07-2008, 17:47
Beautiful photographs of a strange looking creature!!

megzuwo
09-07-2008, 21:03
Where I dive, well, really we're on a military base and can only dive in certain spots. Anyways, there is one Moray out here who is fairly new, but is becoming quiet domestic with how often we dive at this pier. I have to admit that this is insanely entertaining though.

DevilDiver
09-07-2008, 21:15
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2092/2268449404_3b4cd9440b.jpg
Green Moray (Gymnothorax funebris)
Exposure:0.008 sec
Aperture:f/5.6
Focal Length:5.4 mm
ISO Speed:64

NeveSSL
09-07-2008, 22:50
Great pictures, DevilDiver... what camera are you using?

I've got a Nikon D50, but the housings for it cost about 4x to 5x what I paid for the camera, which means I won't be getting one. ;) A Canon G9, on the other hand, is an option a little later down the road. :)

Brandon

DevilDiver
09-09-2008, 17:25
Great pictures, DevilDiver... what camera are you using?

I've got a Nikon D50, but the housings for it cost about 4x to 5x what I paid for the camera, which means I won't be getting one. ;) A Canon G9, on the other hand, is an option a little later down the road. :)

Brandon

The Chain Moray photo's above were shot with the Sealife DC500 and the Green was shot with the DC600.
Right now I am shooting the Sea & Sea DX 1G witch I have been very happy with. I have shot the G9 and found it to be a great camera as well. Should be a good choice...... :smiley20:

NeveSSL
09-09-2008, 17:32
Awesome.... thanks man. :)

Brandon