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namabiru
08-15-2007, 21:40
I'd love to acquire more knowledge about technical maintenance. Not necessarily what I think is covered in the PADI equipment specialist c-card, but the more difficult things, like servicing regs., doing visual inspections on tanks, etc. Where's a good place to learn stuff like this?

cummings66
08-15-2007, 22:17
Talk to your shop about it. You can take courses to become qualified to inspect tanks, rebuild regulators but some of that will require you to be affiliated with a shop. So, talk to your shop.

namabiru
08-16-2007, 14:04
Thanks! When I get to Qatar, I plan to join the local BSAC chapter, and I may be able to hook up with some training that way too. I'm not here for much longer, or I certainly would call in and enquire.

cummings66
08-16-2007, 14:43
Sounds like a plan, just make sure the shop knows you want more from it than the equipment specialty which is nothing more than a glorified cleaning class. They can't teach you what you need to rebuild a regulator or other gear in the short amount of time they have you. The class is still OK for newer divers though.

Buoyant1
08-16-2007, 20:39
Sounds like a plan, just make sure the shop knows you want more from it than the equipment specialty which is nothing more than a glorified cleaning class. They can't teach you what you need to rebuild a regulator or other gear in the short amount of time they have you. The class is still OK for newer divers though.

It depends on the intructor! My class was about 6 hours, we took a reg apart and did annual service on it. did the same with a BC, and went over lots of other gear issues...not to mention field repairs etc.

I think once you go through something like that though, you need to get certified to work on specific brands of equipment. (like you need to be certified through Zeagle to work on Zeagle stuff, Oceanic to work on their stuff etc. ) it's not a universal once and done "ok, I rebuilt a Dacor, not I can work on DiveRite, etc."

Talk to your LDS (or heck PM Larry) I'm sure they could send you in the right direction.

cummings66
08-16-2007, 23:02
Like all things in life, the teacher is the most important asset you can have and one reason why they probaby should make a good living wage.

namabiru
08-17-2007, 12:06
Sounds like a plan, just make sure the shop knows you want more from it than the equipment specialty which is nothing more than a glorified cleaning class. They can't teach you what you need to rebuild a regulator or other gear in the short amount of time they have you. The class is still OK for newer divers though.

It depends on the intructor! My class was about 6 hours, we took a reg apart and did annual service on it. did the same with a BC, and went over lots of other gear issues...not to mention field repairs etc.

I think once you go through something like that though, you need to get certified to work on specific brands of equipment. (like you need to be certified through Zeagle to work on Zeagle stuff, Oceanic to work on their stuff etc. ) it's not a universal once and done "ok, I rebuilt a Dacor, not I can work on DiveRite, etc."

Talk to your LDS (or heck PM Larry) I'm sure they could send you in the right direction.

Yep, and that was my concern too. I didn't just want to learn what a BC was and how you can use BCD cleaner to really get it shined up. I wanted to know how to fix things, or how to take them apart. I probably wouldn't attempt such a thing on my own equipment without having good training and confidence (or even a formalized certification), but at least having a working knowledge is good I think. Then when problems occur, you can diagnose what's happening yourself. You feel better, having a bit more control over your stuff. It's like computer literacy, or the ability to diagnose what's wrong on a car (even if you can't fix it yourself).

Or, as Buoyant1 correctly pointed out, look for a good instructor. An independent will often tweak the class more to fit the diver's needs and what the independent *thinks* the diver should know.

I don't even care if I have a c-card or not for this, and I definitely wasn't looking for one. I would honestly care more about having the know-how, and perhaps even becoming good enough to have a formal certification.

I practice kendo, a Japanese martial art. Part of taking responsibility in kendo is having the ability to take apart, fix your own shinai (bamboo sword), and put it back together properly. Failure to do any of this (fixing splinters, for instance) puts you and your fellow kenshi in jeopardy of becoming injured.

I think scuba is kind of the same. I think every quazi-serious diver (not the 1x a year holiday-maker) should learn some basics, such as replacing tank o-rings, changing hoses on first/second stages, changing one's own mouthpiece, basic U/W camera maintenance (o-rings, etc.), fixing flooded lights, etc.

Knowledge = better self-sufficiency.