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View Full Version : Cavern Course at Oronogo?



beperkins
10-20-2008, 10:27
Does anyone know if they offer a cavern course at Oronogo? If so any details, what areas do you visit (I figured if they have a cavern course they would probably do it in the 4 doors cavern.) what is the cost, etc?

KennyD
10-20-2008, 16:32
Does anyone know if they offer a cavern course at Oronogo? If so any details, what areas do you visit (I figured if they have a cavern course they would probably do it in the 4 doors cavern.) what is the cost, etc?

Yes. Just spoke to John two weeks ago about this. Cost is $200. You will dive Oronogo one day and then go to Roubidoux Springs the next day. John is going to DEMA and taking a little vacation time also. He won't be back to the shop until the second week of Nov.
KennyD

fire diver
10-20-2008, 17:52
ohhhh, Roubidoux..... I've been there, but only on the surface. Would love the chance to dive that. I need to contact my future cavern/cave instructor. But I will have to wait a while since I dont have his email here. I plan on getting my cavern in sometime next year.

CWSWine
11-08-2008, 14:05
What is the difference between the instruction between cave and cavern? Which cert do you have to have to dive Cenotes in Mexico?

Brandon Belew
11-08-2008, 15:25
What is the difference between the instruction between cave and cavern? Which cert do you have to have to dive Cenotes in Mexico?

My understanding.

Cave - no direct path to the surface requiring special gear ( lights, multi-tank, etc )
Cavern - possible easy route to surface and able to use ambient light from the entrance.

I'm probably 100% incorrect.

I would assume cenotes would be considered cave, depending on how far you go of course. They wind under the island for miles.

CWSWine
11-08-2008, 15:40
What is the difference between the instruction between cave and cavern? Which cert do you have to have to dive Cenotes in Mexico?

My understanding.

Cave - no direct path to the surface requiring special gear ( lights, multi-tank, etc )
Cavern - possible easy route to surface and able to use ambient light from the entrance.

I'm probably 100% incorrect.

I would assume cenotes would be considered cave, depending on how far you go of course. They wind under the island for miles.

If you are correct they could be both, I have snorkeled in them with overhead but with access to the surface at all time. I also swam though one and come out in opening on the other end. All most every dive shops in the Playa area list Cenote packages unless the only cert card you need has VISA on it.

fire diver
11-08-2008, 15:50
Yes, you can do guided cenote dives in the playa area. Thats where I did my first cavern dive, and thats where I got hooked on the cave bug.

Yes, cenote's can be either/or/ or both cavern and cave, it all depends on how far in you go. Some (like Chikin Ha which I did) goes underground from one opening to the next, then you go back the reverse route to exit.

Are "trust me" dives safe? No, not really, but we all have to accept our own levels of risk in this hobby. Read up on cave and cavern diving and it's dangers, talk to the dive op about thier cenote dives and decide for yourself if its worth the risk.

CWSWine
11-08-2008, 16:00
This one that I went to that would be fun to dive and you would always have access to the surface. skill wise - I'm a long way from doing any kind of cave diving!!

After the hot visit to Tulum, you will love the next stop - Gran Cenote. This area is unique for its cenotes, which basically are waterfilled sinkholes doubling as entrances to cave systems. This particular cenote is highly decorated with stalactites and stalagmites, both above and beneath the surface. The water is cool and clear as air. Snorkeling in this natural wonder will give you an unforgettable memory that can only be experienced first hand. We snorkel around stalactites and stalagmites for as long as the group enjoys it.

http://www.playa.info/images/tour-tulum-grand3.jpg

http://www.playa.info/images/tour-tulum-grand2.jpg

Grand Little Cenote
http://www.playa.info/images/tour-tulum-azul1.jpg

fire diver
11-08-2008, 16:12
yep, that's the beautiful scenery I remember seeing. I wished I had the video camera for the drive through the jungle to Chikin Ha. But yeah, almost air-clear water, no flow, beautiful cave formations. We even had snokelers on the surface after out first dive. I always wonder what goes through thier monds to see divers come up out of the cave underneath them. We did our safety stop watching the swimmers.

Dive-aholic
11-12-2008, 10:21
What is the difference between the instruction between cave and cavern? Which cert do you have to have to dive Cenotes in Mexico?

The cavern course is the foundation for cave diving. This is where you learn the propulsion techniques, how to use a reel, how to do air shares, lights out exits, etc. It's an intense course that opens up the world of cave diving to people. The course starts off in the classroom discussing limitations of cavern diving, the types of caves, land owner relations, equipment, emergency procedures, communication, etc. It then moves to the water either the afternoon of the 1st day or the next morning. Cavern diving is limited to the daylight zone of the cave and 130 or 200 feet of linear penetration (depending on the agency you train with).

After cavern, there is a basic cave course that introduces more skills and knowledge, then comes full cave. Basic cave allows mainline penetration beyond the mainline. Full cave allows navigational decisions.

Cavern is sufficient to dive the cenotes. In Mexico, many of the systems have cenotes so close to each other that you can swim from one to another without ever leaving the cavern zone because the 2 cavern zones overlap. There are some systems in the Florida panhandle that are the same way.

navyhmc
11-12-2008, 18:57
One caveat to cavern in 130': That is the combined distance from the surface to the deepest part of the cavern you're in...