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cbope
10-26-2008, 13:40
Just like the title says. I'm considering a drysuit since I live in Finland, but I haven't bought one yet and I'm wondering what people wear under them to keep warm. Mostly I'm interested in 40-50F temps which are what we have in the baltic sea in the summer, at depth.

:smilie40:

in_cavediver
10-26-2008, 20:42
Undergarments

OK, I have three different sets. I have a really thin set, a middle weight set and a heavy set. One set came with my Whites suit (since relagated to backup status) and the other two I picked up on Ebay. I have been warm/comfortable in 75 degree spring water and in 38 degree lake water. With three sets, I can tailor the protection to the task at hand.

cbope
10-27-2008, 15:18
Undergarments

OK, I have three different sets. I have a really thin set, a middle weight set and a heavy set. One set came with my Whites suit (since relagated to backup status) and the other two I picked up on Ebay. I have been warm/comfortable in 75 degree spring water and in 38 degree lake water. With three sets, I can tailor the protection to the task at hand.

I guess you mean basically long underwear? If yes, what type? Cotton, poly, silk, etc...

What about wearing a 2-3mil full wetsuit under it? I'm considering whether to get a 2-3mil shorty or full length wetsuit for tropical diving. If I could double that up as insulation under a drysuit all the better and a vote for the full suit.

in_cavediver
10-27-2008, 18:03
Undergarments

OK, I have three different sets. I have a really thin set, a middle weight set and a heavy set. One set came with my Whites suit (since relagated to backup status) and the other two I picked up on Ebay. I have been warm/comfortable in 75 degree spring water and in 38 degree lake water. With three sets, I can tailor the protection to the task at hand.

I guess you mean basically long underwear? If yes, what type? Cotton, poly, silk, etc...

What about wearing a 2-3mil full wetsuit under it? I'm considering whether to get a 2-3mil shorty or full length wetsuit for tropical diving. If I could double that up as insulation under a drysuit all the better and a vote for the full suit.

Well, its kinda like long underwear but not really. The material needs to have some inherent loft so that it can handle compression without losing insulation. It also needs to be a 'wicking' type of material to remove moisture and have insulating qualities when wet. Given that - think synthetic. Cotton will just make you cold.

I can't tell you the exact materials but there is a difference. I can wear my winter wieght sub zero temp snow ski undergarments in the drysuit and get cold in 60+ degree water. They compress and lose thier insulating qualities. My lighter weight drysuit undergarments keep me warm in the drysuit though.

Skip the wetsuit in the drysuit idea. The wetsuit will compress with depth and lose insulation. Good purpose bought undergarments don't have to be that expensive. An ebay set is $50-$125 new. Middle of the road stuff in $100-$200 and then you have premium stuff above that. I chose multiple lower cost undergarments since I am prone to sleeve leaks when cave diving. (its nice to have a set drying and a set to dive) Others go for the premium side. They do well and were cost advantageous to have multiples.

Crimediver
10-27-2008, 19:28
A tuxedo...

MConnelly2
10-27-2008, 19:53
Herein lies the beauty of the Poseidon Jetsuit TNG. Until the watertemps are around 50(f) or so, the most comfortable thing to wear under that drysuit is absolutely nothing at all. Don't knock it 'till you've tried it.

pir8
10-27-2008, 20:12
Dress like you would for sking.

CompuDude
10-28-2008, 01:49
Most people here wear drysuit undergarments, made of polartech on the light side, up to thinsulate on the colder side.

I've read reports that woolen undergarments are fairly popular among Scandinavian divers... you may want to check that out.

RoyN
10-30-2008, 23:41
I wear a speedo under my drysuit undergarment. The fleece of it feels so smooth it sometimes feel like I'm in a drysuit that is filled with jelly. :D

Charles R
10-31-2008, 15:06
Something like this Hollis AUG 100 Undergarment reviews and discounts, Hollis (http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=HollisAUG100Undergarment)

Doug B
10-31-2008, 18:41
Mandalorian Armor. AKA: Boba Fett

brandon
11-02-2008, 23:47
I just bought one of these:

WarmGear Battery Heated Fleece Vest with Zip-On Sleeves: CozyWinters (http://cozywinters.com/shop/heated-vest-6722.html)

Wearing it with the REI expedition weight long underwear I've always worn. I'm pretty cold tolerant, but this is helping take the edge off and longer dives are a lot more pleasant now. Mostly noticing a difference once I get out of the water - much quicker recovery to warm and I'm not chilled for an hour or two after the dive.

Water temperature is currently 43f and falling, typical December-April temparture is around 37f, sometimes as low as 32f if the bays ice over.

45 minutes at those temperatures is pretty cold, even in a drysuit w/ 12mm hood and drygloves!

-B

WaScubaDude
11-06-2008, 16:44
[quote=in_cavediver;239373]Undergarments

snip..
What about wearing a 2-3mil full wetsuit under it? I'm considering whether to get a 2-3mil shorty or full length wetsuit for tropical diving. If I could double that up as insulation under a drysuit all the better and a vote for the full suit.

Neoprene under makes you sweat. Stick with decent water wicking poly under Fleecy or wooly add a nylon shell to that if you like.

shaggie
11-06-2008, 21:04
Polartech or Thinulate, it's thin enough not to bind and bunch up and won't clog your exhaust valve. I found a nice thick Polartech at Underwater Sports in the Seattle area that has kept me warm down to 43 deg.

Wetnurse28
11-10-2008, 12:49
Co-Ed Naked Drysuit Diving.....:smilie39::smilie39:

gNats
11-10-2008, 13:32
I am new to drysuit diving. I am hoping to buy "true" drysuit undergarments, but can't afford them yet. What I have worn thus far is a throwback from my sailing days.

One, I layer, layer, layer.

I start with a silk long-underwear layer top and bottom. Follow with a polypropolene lone sleeved shirt and a close fitting fleece one-piece top/tunic. I wear fleece pants. If I think my legs will be really cold, I have a pair of poly / silk pants that I wear over the long underwear, but under the fleece.

Last weekend, my neck seal leaked. :smiley19: It was my own fault, I forgot to tuck the fleece collar under itself and I am sure that my neck movement caused a gap.

I could tell I was wet, but I wasn't cold from being wet while underwater. Even after the dive ended, I could tell I was wet, but the chill was minimal. That is one of the benefits of fleece, when it does get wet, it warms up. Same with wool. But, wool is bulkier to me.

Of course, I did feel much better after changing. :smiley20:

My dive buddy has the one piece thermal underwear for his drysuit. He wore regular long underwear under that and said he was very comfortable.

But, it is big $$$$. So, until I can afford it, I'm going to have to stick with typical winter layering techniques.

pir8
11-10-2008, 15:33
I am new to drysuit diving. I am hoping to buy "true" drysuit undergarments, but can't afford them yet. What I have worn thus far is a throwback from my sailing days.

One, I layer, layer, layer.

I start with a silk long-underwear layer top and bottom. Follow with a polypropolene lone sleeved shirt and a close fitting fleece one-piece top/tunic. I wear fleece pants. If I think my legs will be really cold, I have a pair of poly / silk pants that I wear over the long underwear, but under the fleece.

Last weekend, my neck seal leaked. :smiley19: It was my own fault, I forgot to tuck the fleece collar under itself and I am sure that my neck movement caused a gap.

I could tell I was wet, but I wasn't cold from being wet while underwater. Even after the dive ended, I could tell I was wet, but the chill was minimal. That is one of the benefits of fleece, when it does get wet, it warms up. Same with wool. But, wool is bulkier to me.

Of course, I did feel much better after changing. :smiley20:

My dive buddy has the one piece thermal underwear for his drysuit. He wore regular long underwear under that and said he was very comfortable.

But, it is big $$$$. So, until I can afford it, I'm going to have to stick with typical winter layering techniques.
Nothing wrong with the Layering Technique. It's actually a good idea, especially if it frees up your money to purchase other needed goodies required for diving.:smilie39:

CFDAlden
11-10-2008, 23:46
I also do the layering thing. My swimtrunks are the base. Then a polypro unionsuit over that. A long sleeve polypro over the top of the union suit is all I need down into the mid-high 40's.

A sweatshirt and sweat pants over that is good to the low 40's. Never been colder than that. :)

This s the type of union suit, very thick.

http://image.sportsmansguide.com/dimage/54760_ts.JPG?cell=200,200&cvt=jpeg

MrGillespie
11-11-2008, 03:18
I wear similar undergarments as I ski. I will probaly but dedicated clothes that will work better if I get a puncture.

monant
11-12-2008, 07:21
A tuxedo...


Dry clothes:smiley36:

monant
11-12-2008, 07:21
A tuxedo...

Dry clothes:smiley36:

RoyN
11-12-2008, 18:42
I use the pinnacle temperate undergarment and a steve & barry fleece jacket. Next I need something like a skin suit and a fleece socks. Anybody have a cheap suggestion?

James1010
11-12-2008, 18:56
Body armor has some full suits that would work great.

Makai
11-13-2008, 08:14
Is there any advantage to going with prupose-built drysuit undergarments instead of good quality winter sports underwear? Those undergarments can be expensive.

gNats
11-13-2008, 08:47
Is there any advantage to going with prupose-built drysuit undergarments instead of good quality winter sports underwear? Those undergarments can be expensive.

They do appear to less bulky. My dive buddy has a drysuit undergarment and he has "less bulk" on than me. I am wearing 3-4 layers and he has on 2 layers.

CompuDude
11-13-2008, 15:25
Is there any advantage to going with prupose-built drysuit undergarments instead of good quality winter sports underwear? Those undergarments can be expensive.

They do appear to less bulky. My dive buddy has a drysuit undergarment and he has "less bulk" on than me. I am wearing 3-4 layers and he has on 2 layers.

Yes, to a certain extent. They also tend to be more optimized for diving, such as things like zipper placement, pocket placement (or just leaving out), etc.

I use a Patagonia base layer. Not diving-specific, but the best base layer money can buy. In the winter I layer over a Carol Davis (https://www.cdsportswear.com/wf_style3.htm) body sock (very similar to most DS undergarments, but technically was not designed for diving, originally). Finally, winter or summer, my main insulation layer is the DUI PowerStretch 300, which is simply really thick polar fleece, nothing more fancy than that, but it's a one-piece, which can be harder to find in outdoors shops, so no gaps between tops and bottoms as you stretch and move around, and the zipper and pocket placement is designed with the drysuit wearer in mind. (The double-ended zipper is especially important when you're trying to use a marine toilet on a boat in heavy seas.)

PuyallupCoug
11-13-2008, 15:45
I have a bare nex-gen drysuit so it has no insulation.

I wear under armor cold gear long underwear (it's the best i've ever owned) and a 100gram insulating jumpsuit from Bare.

cummings66
11-14-2008, 17:50
The very best and warmest undergarment I've tried, and I will say I've only seen Weezles, is the Viking Arctic Plus. Viking, Scandinavian diving equipment, they know what cold is and how to handle it. Of course here it's a $500 undergarment, but perhaps there it'd be much less.

I rarely use mine but I have it, normally I use the Viking Comfort Plus. I also wear a fleece layer under it to soak up sweat, that way the thinsulate doesn't turn stinky and require washing. Thinsulate doesn't like to be washed a lot.

7thcanuck
02-20-2009, 02:06
what do you mean what you wear underneath? i though you had to go commando to remain dry

gNats
02-20-2009, 10:18
hahahaha - well, i'm sure everyone has said to always wear long sleeves and leggings regardless of surface temps. Because the compression of the vinyl against your skin will burn and be very uncomfortable.

During the winter months, I have been wearing long underwear for skiing and fleece layers. I just bought some used drysuit undies, so I will begin wearing a layer of long underwear and the undies and hopefully that will be enough for me.

In the summer when surface and water temps are not that cold, I am teasing everyone that I will wear my bathing suit and flannel jammies. LOL. The flannel jammies wont be excrutiatingly hot on land and they are looser fitting but not as bulky as most sweatpants and shirts.

I think the big thing is the bare skin. Everone I have talked with has only dove in a drysuit once without their arms and legs covered. They do it once and never ever repeat it.

:smiley2:

CompuDude
02-20-2009, 12:49
I think the big thing is the bare skin. Everone I have talked with has only dove in a drysuit once without their arms and legs covered. They do it once and never ever repeat it.

:smiley2:

You don't want to do it in pool, even (experience talking here... my one time LOL). Heck, I put something on if I'm planning to clean my DS in the shower, even! (fastest way to clean them, sometimes) Just simply not comfortable against bare skin. Creepy just thinking about it.

gNats
02-20-2009, 12:56
Is there any advantage to going with prupose-built drysuit undergarments instead of good quality winter sports underwear? Those undergarments can be expensive.

I thought the same thing - I bought a ton of winter sports underwear - a total of 2 full layers (bottoms and tops).

I purchased through REI, and by the time I finished I almost spent as much on the sports wear as the full undergarment.

One thing about my winter sports underwear - it is much bulkier than dry suit undies and retain more air than I think the one piece undies do.

Recently, I purchased a slightly used drysuit undergarment. We'll see if my theories are sound.
:smilie40:

cummings66
02-20-2009, 22:15
I once dove a drysuit with only swim trunks on, it was not a fun experience and it was in a pool as well. Not only do you get damp you get hickies all over and it will pinch you in ways that are not good.

No fun at all, and I won't do it again.

plot
02-21-2009, 11:57
viking drysuit undergarments. very thin, very warm, all i need to wear... dont have to layer 20 dif. things and there's no pinch or anything :D

well worth it imo.

CompuDude
02-23-2009, 11:59
viking drysuit undergarments. very thin, very warm, all i need to wear... dont have to layer 20 dif. things and there's no pinch or anything :D

well worth it imo.

What sort of drysuit, and at what temps?

cummings66
02-23-2009, 17:34
Since he lives not that far from me, a few hours away I assume he's diving the same lakes I do. That means that the temps in the Winter would run upper 30's and in the Summer lower 40's for most places.

The drysuit material as you're alluding to would make a large difference. I dive the 200 gr most of the time rarely using my heavy Viking undergarment. That's in a shell suit as my avatar shows. Some would freeze in it, I'm ok. I prefer to be slighty cold compared to slightly warm when diving.

plot
02-23-2009, 18:43
viking drysuit undergarments. very thin, very warm, all i need to wear... dont have to layer 20 dif. things and there's no pinch or anything :D

well worth it imo.

What sort of drysuit, and at what temps?

viking, vulcanized rubber. as cummings said, usually the lowest i get is lower 40s.

zahgurim
03-01-2009, 04:56
I'm thinking about picking up the new Pinnacle Evolution merino wool undergarment.
If it's anything like the merino I use for biking, it will be very good.

Good on the skin, and unstanky.

pir8
03-01-2009, 08:49
I'm thinking about picking up the new Pinnacle Evolution merino wool undergarment.
If it's anything like the merino I use for biking, it will be very good.

Good on the skin, and unstanky.

I love their 5mm wetsuit

namabiru
03-02-2009, 02:03
I am new to drysuit diving. I am hoping to buy "true" drysuit undergarments, but can't afford them yet. What I have worn thus far is a throwback from my sailing days.

One, I layer, layer, layer.

I start with a silk long-underwear layer top and bottom. Follow with a polypropolene lone sleeved shirt and a close fitting fleece one-piece top/tunic. I wear fleece pants. If I think my legs will be really cold, I have a pair of poly / silk pants that I wear over the long underwear, but under the fleece.

Last weekend, my neck seal leaked. :smiley19: It was my own fault, I forgot to tuck the fleece collar under itself and I am sure that my neck movement caused a gap.

I could tell I was wet, but I wasn't cold from being wet while underwater. Even after the dive ended, I could tell I was wet, but the chill was minimal. That is one of the benefits of fleece, when it does get wet, it warms up. Same with wool. But, wool is bulkier to me.

Of course, I did feel much better after changing. :smiley20:

My dive buddy has the one piece thermal underwear for his drysuit. He wore regular long underwear under that and said he was very comfortable.

But, it is big $$$$. So, until I can afford it, I'm going to have to stick with typical winter layering techniques.

Yep, I've also seen people who wear fleece that they have around the house-- sweats, fleece pullovers, and so forth. Someone said 'dress like you're going skiing', and that's probably about right. I guess just be sure that what you wear underneath doesn't unnecessarily bulk up the drysuit-- (hence the specific undergarments)-- or that you don't underdress.

namabiru
03-02-2009, 02:05
I'm thinking about picking up the new Pinnacle Evolution merino wool undergarment.
If it's anything like the merino I use for biking, it will be very good.

Good on the skin, and unstanky.

I love their 5mm wetsuit

Mmm! I've got a 3mil core warmer, and it's fantastic. I love it so much I'm thinking about making all my full suits merino wool over the next couple of years.

frogman911
03-02-2009, 12:02
I generally don't use much air in my drysuit. On my suit, the shoulder purge can be difficult and make me multi task if I'm having to change to my deco bottle or something else. Therefore i wear a wetsuit under my drysuit. It is comfortable, insulating and it can take the squeeze without giving me hickies. You can get in and out of your drysuit with ease, be comfortable top side. I've seen guys trying to cram their thick undergarments into their suits while sweating perfusely. I can dive up to 100 feet without adding air to my drysuit. I use a 5mm and dive in the chilly waters of lake Michigan with 42 degree water. Give it a shot.

gNats
03-02-2009, 12:26
Is there any advantage to going with prupose-built drysuit undergarments instead of good quality winter sports underwear? Those undergarments can be expensive.

I thought the same thing - I bought a ton of winter sports underwear - a total of 2 full layers (bottoms and tops).

I purchased through REI, and by the time I finished I almost spent as much on the sports wear as the full undergarment.

One thing about my winter sports underwear - it is much bulkier than dry suit undies and retain more air than I think the one piece undies do.

Recently, I purchased a slightly used drysuit undergarment. We'll see if my theories are sound.
:smilie40:

Update:

I purchased the 400 Ultra DUI undies and worn them for the first time this weekend at Oronogo Quarry.

I was TOASTY OASTY warm. Much warmer than I ever remember my long-underwear system to keep me. I also wore the undies during the SI with a men's fleece coat over me and my scarf and hat. Again, I stayed very warm.

They are not for the fashion model conscience. I was the Michelan Man's red-headed GF. (He's not married is he?)

If you are torn between the benefits of true drysuit undies and a few layers of long underwear - I recommend the drysuit undies hands down.

gNats
03-02-2009, 12:29
I generally don't use much air in my drysuit. On my suit, the shoulder purge can be difficult and make me multi task if I'm having to change to my deco bottle or something else. Therefore i wear a wetsuit under my drysuit. It is comfortable, insulating and it can take the squeeze without giving me hickies. You can get in and out of your drysuit with ease, be comfortable top side. I've seen guys trying to cram their thick undergarments into their suits while sweating perfusely. I can dive up to 100 feet without adding air to my drysuit. I use a 5mm and dive in the chilly waters of lake Michigan with 42 degree water. Give it a shot.

Very Interesting Frogman911. What mm wetsuit are you using?

RoyN
03-02-2009, 12:44
I wear the underwear under my drysuit. Sometimes I use bicycle fleece, a sweater fleece, the pinnacle undergardment fleece, a vest I got from sierra trading post and thats about it.

frogman911
03-02-2009, 15:12
I usually dive with a 3mm or 5mm depending on water temp. I dive a wreck in 130 feet at 43 degrees and use the 5mm. Almost no air to add in my drysuit. You keep control of your bouyancy, stay comfortable, don't get hickies. and since it's not getting wet, the wetsuit keeps you warmer and you still don't have to pee every 10 minutes! In fact, i never go in my suit anymore. Try it and see....!

CompuDude
03-02-2009, 16:15
I usually dive with a 3mm or 5mm depending on water temp. I dive a wreck in 130 feet at 43 degrees and use the 5mm. Almost no air to add in my drysuit. You keep control of your bouyancy, stay comfortable, don't get hickies. and since it's not getting wet, the wetsuit keeps you warmer and you still don't have to pee every 10 minutes! In fact, i never go in my suit anymore. Try it and see....!

What happens with respect to sweat and suit compression at depth? Sounds like you'd need a lot of lead to sink that combo...

pir8
03-02-2009, 16:19
I usually dive with a 3mm or 5mm depending on water temp. I dive a wreck in 130 feet at 43 degrees and use the 5mm. Almost no air to add in my drysuit. You keep control of your bouyancy, stay comfortable, don't get hickies. and since it's not getting wet, the wetsuit keeps you warmer and you still don't have to pee every 10 minutes! In fact, i never go in my suit anymore. Try it and see....!
Interesting, I just might have to try this.

frogman911
03-03-2009, 09:56
I usually dive with a 3mm or 5mm depending on water temp. I dive a wreck in 130 feet at 43 degrees and use the 5mm. Almost no air to add in my drysuit. You keep control of your bouyancy, stay comfortable, don't get hickies. and since it's not getting wet, the wetsuit keeps you warmer and you still don't have to pee every 10 minutes! In fact, i never go in my suit anymore. Try it and see....!

What happens with respect to sweat and suit compression at depth? Sounds like you'd need a lot of lead to sink that combo...

Depending on top side weather or work load, you can sweat in the wetsuit. But you do with thick undergarments as well. I haven't had much of a prublem with it. Here in chicago it's not too bad since our summer is about 2 months long. I dive with double HP120 steel's and stainless backplate which is enough to sink me. But i usually put on 8 lbs more so I don't get too light on my ascent and deco stops.

segundo3000gt
04-17-2009, 11:26
I just picked up a Bare D6 compressed neoprene drysuit. I've got some under armour cold gear that I plan to use in more moderate temperatures. I also have an REI polartec layer that I plan to use when the water gets colder (REI Power Stretch Half-Zip Top - Men's Extended Sizes at REI.com (http://www.rei.com/product/769169)). Assuming the collar doesn't get in the way it should work out well. I think a lot of the posts are based on tri-lam drysuits. Can anyone comment on what they need in a neoprene drysuit?

joeforbroke AKA BouzoukiJoe A.K.A. wrecker130 AKA Chuck Norris (banned)
04-17-2009, 18:21
I use a Tilos light weight undergarment with a vest that I made from an REI heavy baselayer shirt by cutting the arms off. I'm good down to the high 40s in my TLS350 drysuit.

snagel
04-18-2009, 07:27
The warmest thing I ever tried was the DUI 400. Nice!!!!!, but I believe it comes with about a $500 price tag.

5mm under the drysuit.....hummmm, sounds like a lot of weight is needed, but I might give this a try sometime.

S. Nagel

cummings66
04-18-2009, 10:30
Trust me, it's not that great of an idea. When you sweat which you will, it won't wick away and you will actually be colder in it than you would be in a normal undergarment which wicks away the sweat.

You can do a quick experiment if you have drygloves. Use a wetsuit glove under it, then compare it to a thin wool liner. If you're like me you'll find the thin wool liner to be much warmer.