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gNats
11-09-2008, 08:49
Hi Ladies!

Okay, this will only work if you diving dry, but I am also researching techniques for diving wet.

I had two dives in about 55 deg F water yesterday and after the first dive (40 minutes) I found my toes were FROZEN. OMG. It took almost 30 minutes for the tingly sensations to go away. I had on 2 pairs of ski socks in my dry suit.

On my second dive, I still wore the 2 pairs of ski socks, but between the two layers I placed those air activated hand warmers. I put them very close to the toes. My DUI suit uses rock boots and there is plenty of room for the little packet at the top of the foot region.

When I came out of the water, my toes were comfortable. No numb swollen feeling or tinglyness. Phew.

My hands on the other hand.....

I am still using wet gloves and will be looking for a hand warmer system that can be submerged. I'm sure that they are out there somewhere.

If anyone knows of a pocket warmer that can withstand water, please pass it along.

LOL - I may even throw a few of the warmers into my dry suit.

If you have not used these before - do not place directly on your skin. They can get VERY HOT and you will not be able to adjust them once dressed and underwater.

Here's another tip - after you are done diving throw them under your bed covers to take the chill out of your bed. :smiley20:

CWSWine
11-09-2008, 08:55
When I use to go football games or deer hunting in the winter I use to buy the back chemical activated heating pads that they use for back pain that wrap around you middle and wear them backwards under heavy coat and just stayed toasty warm.

Empacher
11-09-2008, 09:59
someone once suggested that putting cracked peppercorns in your socks next to your toes would help....Has anyone ever heard of this??

mitsuguy
11-09-2008, 10:32
there are waterproof heat packs that you boil, let set for a while, then when you are ready to use them, press a button on them, then they activate and become warm (hot?) I do not recall the name, but I have used them before... they work quite well

Hoodie
11-10-2008, 08:22
The rechargeable pads you're thinking of are Thermo-Pads.
Thermo-Pad Instant Heating Pad Home Page (http://thermo-pad.com)

Zenagirl
11-10-2008, 08:33
I dive wet, so bought a couple pairs of Merino wool socks for inside my booties. Really helps keep my toes warm....but then again, I'm talking about 70 degree water, not 55 degrees. ;)

gNats
11-10-2008, 08:46
The rechargeable pads you're thinking of are Thermo-Pads.
Thermo-Pad Instant Heating Pad Home Page (http://thermo-pad.com)

thankyouthankyouthankyou.

I knew they existed!

James1010
11-10-2008, 09:45
I have never used any type of heating pads but I have issues with my toes cramping up. I have pins in my feet from Iraq and I don't know if that is the cause or if it is something else. Anyone have the same issues?

BlueC5Kitten
11-10-2008, 09:51
I get cramps in my ankle where I have some hardware keeping the bones in place. I typically just use my scuba socks and scuba booties...and I try a variety of finning techniques, if a flutter causes pain, I changed to a frog or modified frog, and vice versa.

WV Diver
11-10-2008, 09:58
A good pair of 3mm neoprene soft boots should take care of 55*F water and keep you toasty warm, without all the fuss.

I have used them for several years and found that down to about 50*F, with rock boots, they are nice. I dive a trilam shell suit.

CompuDude
11-11-2008, 14:32
Thick winter wool socks should keep your feet warm. If they work while hiking in below-freezing temps there's no reason why they should not work in 40-50 degree water, in your drysuit.

As for gloves, nothing beats the Diving Concepts ring system for drygloves. :smiley20:

MSilvia
11-11-2008, 15:29
I hate to be the voice of doom and gloom, but PLEASE be careful using chemical heat packs in a drysuit. Many of those things work by reacting with oxygen, and o2 partial pressures can increase way beyond the design limitations of said heat packs while diving. That's especially true of nitrox, so if you're inflating your suit with air, nitrox, or any gas containing oxygen, look out.

I know of at least one diver who found his heat packs giving him 2nd degree burns when he had 15 minutes of deco obligation in 40 degree water. I believe he opted to flood his suit a bit to "put out the fire", but I'd advise against putting yourself in that position.

Hoodie
11-11-2008, 15:52
You're right that many do use oxygen to work, they're the disposable ones. Those kind also won't work if they get wet. The Thermo-Pads work on phase change and have a preset maximum temp. I know many divers using them. This is a video of an ice dive where they used them. YouTube - Tuesday's Dive 04 03 08 (http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=9eOdwvyxAvM&feature=related)

MSilvia
11-11-2008, 15:56
The Thermo-Pads work on phase change and have a preset maximum temp.
Yeah, those are fine. The disposables can put a serious hurt on you if you aren't careful though, and I didn't want that to catch any of you nice folks by suprise.

gNats
11-11-2008, 17:22
I hate to be the voice of doom and gloom, but PLEASE be careful using chemical heat packs in a drysuit. Many of those things work by reacting with oxygen, and o2 partial pressures can increase way beyond the design limitations of said heat packs while diving. That's especially true of nitrox, so if you're inflating your suit with air, nitrox, or any gas containing oxygen, look out.

I know of at least one diver who found his heat packs giving him 2nd degree burns when he had 15 minutes of deco obligation in 40 degree water. I believe he opted to flood his suit a bit to "put out the fire", but I'd advise against putting yourself in that position.

Well, I will admit to wondering what the pressure depths would do to these little packets. Maybe I will contact the mfg and see if there are any studies....

gNats
11-11-2008, 17:23
You're right that many do use oxygen to work, they're the disposable ones. Those kind also won't work if they get wet. The Thermo-Pads work on phase change and have a preset maximum temp. I know many divers using them. This is a video of an ice dive where they used them. YouTube - Tuesday's Dive 04 03 08 (http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=9eOdwvyxAvM&feature=related)

Thanks Hoodie!

brandon
11-12-2008, 00:58
As for gloves, nothing beats the Diving Concepts ring system for drygloves. :smiley20:
Except the Viking bayonet ring system =p

-B

CompuDude
11-12-2008, 01:45
As for gloves, nothing beats the Diving Concepts ring system for drygloves. :smiley20:
Except the Viking bayonet ring system =p

-B

As long as you don't mind pulling freaking hula hoops through the harness straps, sure. ;)

MSilvia
11-12-2008, 11:15
Maybe I will contact the mfg and see if there are any studies....

Assuming you dive to 66 feet on air, you could simplify the question and ask if they have any recommendations regarding using their heat packs in a 63% oxygen environment.

Hoodie
11-12-2008, 12:18
Here's some info on the reusable, kind Dive Testing (http://thermo-pad.com/dive.htm)

brandon
11-12-2008, 23:44
As for gloves, nothing beats the Diving Concepts ring system for drygloves. :smiley20:
Except the Viking bayonet ring system =p

-B

As long as you don't mind pulling freaking hula hoops through the harness straps, sure. ;)

Rofl, they're not that big! I do love mine though, hula hoopness and all =)

-B

brandon
11-12-2008, 23:59
EZ Heat Reusable Hand Warmer at REI.com (http://www.rei.com/product/608751)

Little bit cheaper source for the 4x4" approx sodium heatwarmers...

I'm going to be in Anchorage next week and think I'll look at REI for the dive buddies...

-B

kjvander
12-01-2008, 10:28
I'm sure that if you asked them about this they might think that you were a little crazy because that high of O2 environment doesn't exist too many places. However it is a good idea to use the pads....just be careful.





Maybe I will contact the mfg and see if there are any studies....

Assuming you dive to 66 feet on air, you could simplify the question and ask if they have any recommendations regarding using their heat packs in a 63% oxygen environment.

kjvander
12-01-2008, 10:28
Plus i wonder how many heating pad manufacturers have done studies on them for diving purposes....would be interesting to find out.

gNats
12-01-2008, 10:40
Plus i wonder how many heating pad manufacturers have done studies on them for diving purposes....would be interesting to find out.

I visited a dive shop in Chatham Ontario Friday night. As the group of us were leaving the store to head across the street for a pint (Canada, eh) I noticed the store owner had several sized re-usable gel heat packs, made for diving conditions.

I'm going to pick up a set, and will report back and positives and negatives.

Hoodie
12-01-2008, 11:52
Here is a link to some research done Dive Testing (http://thermo-pad.com/dive.htm)