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cowgirldiver
12-03-2008, 12:47
I usually go to the gym between 4-7 times a week. As the time for a dive trip gets closer, I have a dilemma. I spend all my time during the workout/class thinking about what if I hurt myself doing this and I can't dive. Last night in a way too intensive cardio pump class, as we were doing squats with weights, I kept thinking my right knee kind of hurt and what if this makes it worse. Sometimes these thoughts can occur as I'm walking across my nut filled yard-what if I twist my ankle. And yet, if I want to keep fitting into my wetsuit I must workout....

WV Diver
12-03-2008, 13:06
Plan your workout to have a weeks lay off prior to trips. You need a week to recoup every now and then anyway. I try to do six weeks and take a break for a week at a time.

MSilvia
12-03-2008, 13:12
How about low impact aerobics like spinning?

lucidblue
12-03-2008, 13:19
If you don't want to take a week off you could plan a week of cardio, only using the bike, eliptical, treadmill or stair climber. At least you are decreasing your risk of injury.

kjvander
12-03-2008, 13:42
I would tend to agree....if you are worried about injury...then stick with some lower impact activities....and then when you get back you can step it back up again.

fireflock
12-03-2008, 14:14
I guess you have to decide if it's a mental thing or an actual real risk. You might look into some kind of travel insurance if it's the cost of the trip you are worried about.

You could also switch to swimming for a week before the trip. Swimming laps gets me in the mood to dive anyway.

shawnwill36
12-05-2008, 09:30
my dive instructor always said that diving is for lazy people. he is about 300lbs and not all muscle either :)

lucidblue
12-05-2008, 10:29
my dive instructor always said that diving is for lazy people. he is about 300lbs and not all muscle either :)

Probably why a lot of diving deaths are due to heart attacks...

bane51031
12-11-2008, 19:47
Switching to low impact is a great option, I hated that eliptical when I first got on it but, it is much easier on my knees and the suggestion of swimming was a great idea as well...

Monkeylemon
12-19-2008, 18:18
I'm in love with the elliptical machine! I feel like I'm doing my knees and feet a favor.

fyrdyvr
01-08-2009, 12:44
I know that feeling of "I must work out...pain be damned". My back has been hurting me for over a week, still I run or dance with the elliptical every day. As far as diving and exercise, I read an interesting article in Dive Training that suggested that strenuous activity prior to diving could make you more susceptible to DCS. The theory behind it sounded pretty logical so I don't engage in any exercise when I am on a dive trip. Better safe than sorry!

Rockhound76
01-08-2009, 14:02
How about low impact aerobics like spinning?


I don't know about you, but for me, spinning is anaerobic. I just got out of class about an hour ago.

My heart rate is pretty low at this moment, but I think it's because it stopped somewhere between the 4th sprint interval and the 5th set of 1-count jumps.

All kidding aside, I highly recommned spinning with the caveat that you should make sure the bike is adjusted correctly and that you spin with the proper technique. A set too low or too far back or forward or "toe picking" (riding with the toes down at the bottom of the stroke) WILL hurt your knees.

MSilvia
01-08-2009, 14:44
Probably why a lot of diving deaths are due to heart attacks...
That, or it could be because unexplained diver deaths are often attributed to heart attacks for lack of any idea how they actually happened.

Skuttle
01-08-2009, 20:05
How about low impact aerobics like spinning?


I don't know about you, but for me, spinning is anaerobic. I just got out of class about an hour ago.

My heart rate is pretty low at this moment, but I think it's because it stopped somewhere between the 4th sprint interval and the 5th set of 1-count jumps.

All kidding aside, I highly recommned spinning with the caveat that you should make sure the bike is adjusted correctly and that you spin with the proper technique. A set too low or too far back or forward or "toe picking" (riding with the toes down at the bottom of the stroke) WILL hurt your knees.

I've always wanted to try a spin class, but have been to embarassed to ask how to get the bike adjust for myself. Good thing I just didn't hop on and go. I have bad knees.

Rockhound76
01-09-2009, 08:28
How about low impact aerobics like spinning?


I don't know about you, but for me, spinning is anaerobic. I just got out of class about an hour ago.

My heart rate is pretty low at this moment, but I think it's because it stopped somewhere between the 4th sprint interval and the 5th set of 1-count jumps.

All kidding aside, I highly recommned spinning with the caveat that you should make sure the bike is adjusted correctly and that you spin with the proper technique. A set too low or too far back or forward or "toe picking" (riding with the toes down at the bottom of the stroke) WILL hurt your knees.

I've always wanted to try a spin class, but have been to embarassed to ask how to get the bike adjust for myself. Good thing I just didn't hop on and go. I have bad knees.


Don't ever be afraid to ask. Get there early enough for the instructor to help you. You can also ask one of the more experienced spinners for a rough setup to start.

Here is the basic setup:

1) SEAT HEIGHT: Put your HEEL on the pedal on the bottom of the stroke. Raise the seat so that your leg is straight and while your hips remain flat across the seat (no dip on one side). To check the height, clip in or put your shoes in the pedal cages. Pedal a few rotations to get settled in the seat, then drop one foot to the bottom of the stroke. If the height is right, your leg will now be bent about 10deg. (since the ball of your foot, not the heel is on the pedal, you don't have to stretch as much).

2) FORE AND AFT SADDLE POSITION: With your feet no clipped in or in the cages, rotate them until the pedals are parallel to the floor, one pedal forward, one back. Look down over the front of the knee of the leg with the forwardmost pedal. If you were to drop a plumb bob down from the front of your knee, the line should drop straight down to the pedal spindle (axle). Move the seat front or back until you reach this point, then recheck the seat height too, as moving the seat can change the leg position.

3) TILT Don't worry about this too much. A flat seat is fine for spinning, just make sure it's tight and holds its position.

4) HANDLEBAR HEIGHT: Your choice. I ride on the road, so I prefer the handlebars at or a little below the height of the seat. New riders would probably do better with the bars about 6" higher.

Riding positions: Simple. NEVER lean on your arms, resting your weight on the handlebars. This will hurt your back. The bars should be for balance and control. Standing up to pedal, the saddle should be lightly brushing your inner thigh as you ride with your hands lightly resting on the handlebar for balance. Feel free to rock your weight a little as spin bikes do not move like a real bike and you will need to move to adjust as you spin. NEVER lock your arms. Keep them flexed and slightly pumping to the cadence. Keep tension on the wheel using the knob or lever. Too little tension and you'll be bouncing around and this can hurt you. Cadence should be smooth, your legs should never lock at the bottom of the stroke and you should always feel "light in the pedals", a sign your are using the entire stroke, pulling up, gliding across, pushing down and not just "mashing the pedals", which usually leads to overextension on the downstoke, which will hurt your knees.

Climbing positions (standing) are usually called out by the instuctor. Pos. 1 is with your hands closest to your body on the back of the bar. Pos. 2 is with the hands on "curve" of the bar or slightly up. Pos. 3 is with your hands on the ends of the bars. These usually correspond, in order, from light or high cadence hills to heavy climbs.

Sitting climbs can hurt your knees with bad technique. Move your butt back on the saddle to get more drive from your quads and concentrate on pedalling circles, not pumping down. YOU have control of the tension. If your knee starts to twinge, ease off.

Listen to the intructor's cadence and heartrate cues. IF you follow them, you will have a great workout. If you don't, you'll either blow up or get no benefit at all. YOU have control of the bike and the tension knob. You can be lazy or you can work.


Dang, I just realized this is way TMI. Apologies. I speed-typed it, by gosh, I'm sending it.http://forum.scubatoys.com/images/icons/icon7.gif

fldiver
01-30-2009, 19:32
I like to go to the track and run 3 miles daily for exercise.

Straegen
01-31-2009, 11:04
Repetitive stress injuries are likely the injury that will keep you from diving or create enough pain to hamper the enjoyment just before a trip. I would avoid the Wii and stay away from activities that tend to stress joints such as the treadmill a week or so before heading out. Cycle, elliptical, low weights higher reps on a yoga ball would all be in my list of items to include in my workouts prior to a trip.

I would also point out that weight does not equal fitness. Muscle strength, flexibility and cardio are the real determining factors.

Lulubelle
01-31-2009, 12:00
I read an interesting article in Dive Training that suggested that strenuous activity prior to diving could make you more susceptible to DCS. The theory behind it sounded pretty logical so I don't engage in any exercise when I am on a dive trip. Better safe than sorry!

This article sounds interesting, care to provide a link? My assumption is that this is referring to strenuous exercise just prior to diving?

I don't alter my fitness routine prior to dive trips, but neither am I working out 10 minutes before I dive in.

Only concession I made prior to my liveaboard is that my trainer had me doing some stuff that made one of my shoulders funky for a couple of days the week before the trip, so I wouldn't do any shoulder-stressing things before I went such as boxing, pushups, etc.

22 dives in 5 days was enough exercise during the trip, especially those dives in current.

chicken
01-31-2009, 13:49
I have read that strenuous exercise just prior or shortly after a dive can increase the chance for DCS. I don't work out the day of my dive and try to wait 24 hours after the last dive before a strenuous workout.

Straegen
01-31-2009, 14:12
After I think is bad, but before I am not so sure about. I was reading the post over at scubaboard.com on the subject and it has some interesting thoughts on the before workout.

chicken
01-31-2009, 14:21
Before is not as bad, I wouldn't leave the finish line of a marathon and jog to the dive boat...the fact is all of the causes of DCS are not known but some activities seems to increase the risk. From what I have read, I choose to skip the gym on dive day and like flying, I wait 18-24 hours before running or spinning.

fanatique
02-06-2009, 12:22
I think you should definitely cut down on your gym work as your dive trip looms nearer. Let your muscles rest so you'll have fun scuba diving instead of with soreness everywhere! Maybe you can tone it down to light weights with high reps the week before you leave for the dive trip.

mitsuguy
05-25-2009, 06:20
The PT requirement's are already low enough as it is. 3 Minute's in Navy bootcamp and a 10 Minute water tread for recreational SCUBA Diving. What that That mean's to you and me is that, recreational SCUBA Diving has higher requirement's than uncle SAM. I majored in Coaching and Sport's Administration from the U of Southern Miss. and was awarded a Degree in the Navy for promotional reason's. Go figure. The student council is trying to standardize and trying to regulate all of recreational SCUBA diving under their one Federation and wishes not to acknowledge other's. They are wrong. It ain't gonna happen. That's why NAUI didn't join. Because NAUI doesn't have to. PADI, SDI and SSI joined and now have to abide by their rule's and procedure's. Their slave's. Ha, Ha. If someone doesn't want to take the PT Swim test then don't join the dive club, who then joins the certifying agency such as PADI, who then joins the student council. Sucker's. It's a marketing money making scheme. SCUBA on your own. Yes, you can because I said so. Make your own club, name it whatever you want and write your own swim requirement's. (Free entrepreneurship). Swim test requirement's are ONLY I repeat ONLY with-in the organization. They can never tell a free lance diver wether they can dive or or not. That's why the Navy certifies their own SCUBA Diver's with just a certificate of completion and that's it. And it's rare to see one anymore, not in the new Navy. It take's a million member's to be wrong but it take's only 1 to be right. This is what happen's when you submit your power's to an organization under contract. Stay in physical shape to under-goe that activity with-out having to struggle. If a diver want's to be fat body it's his/her own problem not your's or mine.

try renting tanks or getting air fills without a cert card from a recognizable agency... might not be as easy as you think...

Crimediver
05-25-2009, 07:30
I've been diving since 1967 and have only been asked for a c-card one time when I purchased a pony bottle in FLA. A couple of dive boats asked me for for a card, also in FLA. Other than that no gear purchases or rentals, air fills or dives I have done required me showing a card. I dove my first 20 years without even having a card.

I believe if you own your own gear, which can all be bought without having a c-card, you can pretty much dive all you want without being hassled by the scuba nazis.

The only card a diver really needs is a credit card.

navyhmc
05-25-2009, 08:11
I've been diving since 1967 and have only been asked for a c-card one time when I purchased a pony bottle in FLA. A couple of dive boats asked me for for a card, also in FLA. Other than that no gear purchases or rentals, air fills or dives I have done required me showing a card. I dove my first 20 years without even having a card.

I believe if you own your own gear, which can all be bought without having a c-card, you can pretty much dive all you want without being hassled by the scuba nazis.

The only card a diver really needs is a credit card.

I've been "carded" with some frequency, especially on charters I have not been before and getting air in non-local shops for air. Never for gear, but for air and trips, yes. I usually don't havea problem showing a card, as this means that operator is adhereing to a standard that was set over time bythe industry. Sometimes I don't get asked-I guess I look like I've been diving for a while (not as long as you though...1967! You da man! :smiley20: :smiley36: )

That said, I did have a couple of guys that did try to get air fills and not show a card when asked. When they asked for a fill, I asked for a card and they stalled and hemmed about not having in on them. I hate to say it, but they just raised flags. Long story short, no card, no fill. They did get a fill from another shop and proceeded to become tow of the first DCS cases in Kansas when they did a 20'-30' breath hold ascent and both of them popped lungs. The shop that did fill, did not survive the lawsuit.

I've had a few folks pull the "You're not certified for that (usually night or deep) Usually I refer to my AOW card from 1984, laugh and tell them that I've logged more deep dives or night dives or current before the specialty came out than they have had dives. Which is usually true.

I've not gone on one boat because I didn't have the deep card. Then they realized that I was sort of scouting charters for a group of 30 divers that would be doing a weeks worth of dives. Guess which boat did not get the business.

Largo
05-25-2009, 16:52
I don't think that it's safe to be kissing underwater, on scuba.

Largo
05-25-2009, 16:53
Oops! Sorry! I thought the title of the thread was "Diving and Making Out." I read it wrong. Freudian slip, I guess.

Sorry everybody!

chinacat46
05-25-2009, 17:19
Oops! Sorry! I thought the title of the thread was "Diving and Making Out." I read it wrong. Freudian slip, I guess.

Sorry everybody!

Okay but don't let it happen again!

Largo
05-25-2009, 17:29
How would that work? You're not supposed to hold your breath, unless you're completely stationary (i.e. sitting on the bottom). I guess you could exhale through your nose when you're making out, but then your mask would get all foggy...unless the water was really warm. So, maybe it's OK to dive and make-out in the tropics, but not in cold water, like Hudson Bay?

Brainstorm! PADI Specialty: Subaquatic Amorous Encounters

Vlane
05-25-2009, 17:50
I agree with what others said about taking some time off before a dive, or at least switch to low impact workouts. A week before our state meet in high school, our cross country coach would switch to swim workouts in the morning rather than running. Swimming can be a great full body workout as well as cardio, but cycling also sounds like it'd be fun.

Splitlip
05-25-2009, 17:56
Last night in a way too intensive cardio pump class, as we were doing squats with weights, I kept thinking my right knee kind of hurt and what if this makes it worse.

OMG! I can't believe I missed this thread.

You must post pictures. Then we might be of some help. :smiley2:

severian
05-26-2009, 06:07
I wouldn't do anything crazy the week before a dive trip, but your regular work out regimen should be fine. I don't like skipping workouts, so I use my dive time as my "break" from the gym. Sounds to me as if u are letting anxiety take over.....worried about spraining an ankle walking across your yard?????:smiley2:

UofTOrange
05-26-2009, 08:05
I wouldn't do anything crazy the week before a dive trip, but your regular work out regimen should be fine. I don't like skipping workouts, so I use my dive time as my "break" from the gym. Sounds to me as if u are letting anxiety take over.....worried about spraining an ankle walking across your yard?????:smiley2:

Ya, I just started back up, but I figure it's better to keep it up than take a week off

chinacat46
05-26-2009, 10:28
I wouldn't do anything crazy the week before a dive trip, but your regular work out regimen should be fine. I don't like skipping workouts, so I use my dive time as my "break" from the gym. Sounds to me as if u are letting anxiety take over.....worried about spraining an ankle walking across your yard?????:smiley2:

I agree I just do my normal workout right up until I leave. I'm heading out Friday and I just finished todays workout and plan on Wens and Thurs. If my flight Friday was late I'd workout then to but my flight is at 8:30am so I won't have time on Friday. A week of diving is a week off since I dive real slow. It isn't much of a workout even doing 4-5 dives a day.

Ajaxv2
06-02-2009, 11:40
In the words of Oddball from Kelly's Heroes "Enough with the negative waves, man!"

loki
06-03-2009, 08:43
i am not sure if someone mentioned this or not as i did not go through all 3 pages of replies, but why not (the week or a few days before your trip) grab your fins, mask, snorkel and hit the pool and just do laps??

cappence
06-13-2009, 00:20
It has helped me to reduce injuries by learning to listen to my body while working out. In the past I would push myself to the point where I was getting injuries often. I realized that I was losing what I had gained when injured. I have learned to pace myself and enjoy the workout more. In the last two years I have not had an injury while I still workout in the gym three days and ride a bicycle three days each week. I am now more fit than I have ever been due to the fact that I have not had to miss a week of workout in two years. The important thing about working out is that your goal is to be able to stay fit through out your whole life, not just for now.

cowgirldiver
06-15-2009, 16:17
I wouldn't do anything crazy the week before a dive trip, but your regular work out regimen should be fine. I don't like skipping workouts, so I use my dive time as my "break" from the gym. Sounds to me as if u are letting anxiety take over.....worried about spraining an ankle walking across your yard?????:smiley2:
You missed the nut-filled portion of the worry about the yard.... As U of T mentioned-it is better to keep it up in some way. I'm not very self motivated-I've got to go to classes of some sort. We just came off the break between spring and summer semester with last week being the first week of seriously working out since the middle of May. Let's just say that by the end of the week I wasn't moving very fast!!