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Reg
12-30-2008, 04:06
Does anyone know what this green stuff is on the inside of 1st stage. Is there a way to clean this off Or do i need to get this services?

RnSdiver
12-30-2008, 06:22
Just a guess on my part, but to me a green filter means service time. no telling what else inside is green and gummed up.

chicken
12-30-2008, 07:48
That looks like corrosion from lack of cleaning and or service. I would take it in/send it in for cleaning and service.

navyhmc
12-30-2008, 08:02
As has been said, that is corrosion from less than needed upkeep. Looks to be a brass screen that has a lot of patina. I would strongly recommend sending that reg in for service. That is a reg failure looking to happen.

Lone Frogman
12-30-2008, 08:44
Ditto the above. You need a cap for your first stage, if you have one you should use it. First get it serviced.

ScubaToys Larry
12-30-2008, 08:44
The filters typically don't corrode - that means what has happened is water has gotten into the first stage from not keeping a dry dust cap on - and that moisture is corroding the inside of the first stage, and that is leeching onto the filter.

When we do a service, the whole reg is torn apart, and then the individual pieces are placed in a sonic cleaner with special solutions that will take off the corrosion without hurting the material itself.

If there is corrosion present, the o-rings, seats, etc can get torn up by the roughness of the corrosion, and then you could have rather major failures of the reg...

So to echo everyone else - yes... have it serviced. Regulator Repair (http://scubatoys.com/store/regs/regrepair.asp)

awap
12-30-2008, 10:34
I'd get a pair of snap ring pliers and remove that filter and take a peek to see what is below it. If that verdigris is growing thru the filter from the inside of the 1st stage, the first stage is probably a real mess.

I think it is more likely that you have encountered a bad tank with corrosion of the valve and dip tube. If that is the case, the filter may just be doing it's job and the 1st stage may be fine (or at least not as bad as that filter suggests it might be).

At a minimum, change the filter.

fisheater
12-30-2008, 10:42
It's a reg. NO HALF MEASURES!

Get it serviced by a pro before you use it.

awap
12-30-2008, 10:49
It's a reg. NO HALF MEASURES!

Get it serviced by a pro before you use it.

The only times I have ever had problems with my regulators is immediately after a "pro" had serviced it.

Even if you have no desire to service your own gear, learning how to inspect and troubleshoot regulator problems will make you a safer diver.

If you are unable or unwilling to do such inspections, then hopefully you can find someone competent to do it for you. Good inspections can avoid unnecessary service and the problems they can cause.

mm2002
12-30-2008, 11:07
Compare the cost of servicing regulators regularly to a couple of days in the hospital.......or worse....a funeral.

awap
12-30-2008, 11:18
Compare the cost of servicing regulators regularly to a couple of days in the hospital.......or worse....a funeral.

With that logic, how do you rationalize not servicing your regulators after every dive?

When is the last time you had a brake job done on your car?

IndyDiver
12-30-2008, 11:31
Compare the cost of servicing regulators regularly to a couple of days in the hospital.......or worse....a funeral.

Lets see...

Reg service at ST - $49.95 + shipping one way. Not too bad.

Hospital Stay - I have a good medical plan that has a $750 out-of-pocket max + DAN insurance, so this should only cost a few hundred dollars. Looks like reg service is the better deal.

Funeral - This could get real expensive, but I won't have to deal with the bills. Plus there will be plenty of insurance to cover the cost, so this alternative will turn a net profit.

Yep, cheapest thing to do is ignore the obvious indicator for servicing the reg and have it fail on a deep dive.

IndyDiver
12-30-2008, 11:34
When is the last time you had a brake job done on your car?

I think a better question is: " When was the last time you changed the oil in your car?"

awap
12-30-2008, 12:06
Compare the cost of servicing regulators regularly to a couple of days in the hospital.......or worse....a funeral.

Lets see...

Reg service at ST - $49.95 + shipping one way. Not too bad.

Hospital Stay - I have a good medical plan that has a $750 out-of-pocket max + DAN insurance, so this should only cost a few hundred dollars. Looks like reg service is the better deal.

Funeral - This could get real expensive, but I won't have to deal with the bills. Plus there will be plenty of insurance to cover the cost, so this alternative will turn a net profit.

Yep, cheapest thing to do is ignore the obvious indicator for servicing the reg and have it fail on a deep dive.

The catch is that regulators that fail from a lack of service tend to fail gracefully. That is, they will leak (slowly at first) or be more difficult breathing. In either case, heed the early warning signs and service the regulator. Regulators that fall victim to service errors or defective parts will also tend to fail gracefully but are much more likely to fail with little or no warning in a potentially catastrophic manner.

Bottom line: If you really believe that a serious regulator failure is likely to put you in a hospital or a coffin, don't have your regulator serviced. Rather, trade it in on a set of golf clubs or something else you can handle.

BTW, my reg services typically cost me about $10 in parts. I still see no reason to service them unnecessarily. But I do inspect them quite often and give them thorough post dive care and cleaning.

USF_Diver
12-30-2008, 12:09
So its a wet dust cap that causes that?
I have a few little spots of green on my filter but nothing close to that bad.

mm2002
12-30-2008, 12:59
Compare the cost of servicing regulators regularly to a couple of days in the hospital.......or worse....a funeral.

With that logic, how do you rationalize not servicing your regulators after every dive?

When is the last time you had a brake job done on your car?

In a way, I DO service them after every dive. I clean them, and store them properly. That is a form of servicing, no?

I change my brakes when the little squeaky thing starts to squeak. :smiley36:
A better analogy would be oil changes. Do you wait until a rod starts knocking to change your oil?

awap
12-30-2008, 15:31
In a way, I DO service them after every dive. I clean them, and store them properly. That is a form of servicing, no?

I change my brakes when the little squeaky thing starts to squeak. :smiley36:
A better analogy would be oil changes. Do you wait until a rod starts knocking to change your oil?

No, I would not consider user cleaning and storing a regulator part of "servicing".

And I believe the brakes are the better analogy. And I agree that the time to service the brakes is when they show a symptom of a problem. Buit it is quite possible to do the same type of thing with oil. You don't have to wait until a bearing fails. The US Army has found it to be cost effective to change oil base on periodic testing of oil samples for contaminants indicative of oil breakdown or other incipient problems. Probably not cost effective for folks like you and I.

But there are cost effective ways of inspecting your regulator to determine if an "annual service" is warranted. I actively use about 6 regulators, and none see more than about 25 dives per year. The only special tool required is an IP gauge. Mine cost me about $10 which was the price of the scuba adapter I added to my engine compression gauge. That, and a little bit of knowledge about how to inspect, what to look and how to interpret results has me going 3 to 5 years (and more) between "annual services". But if you would rather just service your gear yearly then I'm sure your tech won't mind. Hopefully, he is one of the good ones. You see, there really is nothing in your regulator that has only a 1 year useful life span. Those parts that are routinely replaced can easily go at least 5 years before they "wear out". Often, the HP seat is the weakest link but it is the primary thing tested by the IP gauge. Static o-ring can last the life of your regulator. Dynamic o-ring do wear out but if the surfaces are kept clean and lubricated, they can also go for a very long time. If they are failing after only one year of service, then there is either a design problem or corrosion and salt deposits, from inadequate soaking, are probably accelerating their demise.



So its a wet dust cap that causes that?
I have a few little spots of green on my filter but nothing close to that bad.

No, the filter is stainless steel so it will not produce verdigris directly. Verdigris is produced by the corrosion of copper and its alloys, including brass. Usually, the stuff you see on the surface of a filter like that came from a tank. That is why the filter is there.

You can also get verdigris inside your first stage if SW has been allowed to get in. But that should not be expected to show up on the surface of the filter. A little around the edges of the filter might well indicate inadequate cleaning of the dust cap. If you remove hoses and see verdigris, then the problem is probably more than inadequate cleaning and drying of the dust cap. A common cause of this more severe problem is the failure to blow out a tank valve before you mount your regulator on the tank.

SkuaSeptember
12-30-2008, 15:44
Since the need for service has been pretty well covered, I'll just make a small point on prevention. The few times I've seen that much corrosion it has been because the diver made the well intentioned mistake of routinely soaking the reg with the dust cap ON, believing that the cap will provide a dry watertight seal. It doesn't.
Also, some second stages are open when not under pressure which can allow moisture to work its way back into the first stage if soaked, rinsed or stored improperly.
Best practice is to soak your reg while attached to a tank and under pressure, let it dry that way and then store it properly.

tndiverdude
12-30-2008, 16:12
I haven't had it that bad but I have had rust on the spring. Now that I ahve seen this first hand I know what else to look for in ebay bargains.

mm2002
12-30-2008, 16:49
No, I would not consider user cleaning and storing a regulator part of "servicing".

Preventive maintenance can surely be considered a form of "service", and properly cleaning, drying, lubricating (if required), and storing any equipment after use, is nothing less than preventive maintenance.


And I believe the brakes are the better analogy. And I agree that the time to service the brakes is when they show a symptom of a problem. Buit it is quite possible to do the same type of thing with oil. You don't have to wait until a bearing fails. The US Army has found it to be cost effective to change oil base on periodic testing of oil samples for contaminants indicative of oil breakdown or other incipient problems. Probably not cost effective for folks like you and I.

There again, changing your oil at regular intervals (whether you think it needs it or not), is a form of preventive maintenance. When you change your oil, you are "servicing" your vehicle.


But there are cost effective ways of inspecting your regulator to determine if an "annual service" is warranted. I actively use about 6 regulators, and none see more than about 25 dives per year. The only special tool required is an IP gauge. Mine cost me about $10 which was the price of the scuba adapter I added to my engine compression gauge. That, and a little bit of knowledge about how to inspect, what to look and how to interpret results has me going 3 to 5 years (and more) between "annual services". But if you would rather just service your gear yearly then I'm sure your tech won't mind. Hopefully, he is one of the good ones. You see, there really is nothing in your regulator that has only a 1 year useful life span. Those parts that are routinely replaced can easily go at least 5 years before they "wear out". Often, the HP seat is the weakest link but it is the primary thing tested by the IP gauge. Static o-ring can last the life of your regulator. Dynamic o-ring do wear out but if the surfaces are kept clean and lubricated, they can also go for a very long time. If they are failing after only one year of service, then there is either a design problem or corrosion and salt deposits, from inadequate soaking, are probably accelerating their demise.

So what you're saying is you don't believe in preventive maintenance. You go by the old saying; if it ain't broke, don't fix it.
I believe in regular scheduled preventive maintenance. That's just me!

Seriously, I see and understand all of your points, it just go's to show that everyone has their own ways of doing things. :smiley20:

awap
12-30-2008, 17:29
So what you're saying is you don't believe in preventive maintenance. You go by the old saying; if it ain't broke, don't fix it.
I believe in regular scheduled preventive maintenance. That's just me!

Seriously, I see and understand all of your points, it just go's to show that everyone has their own ways of doing things. :smiley20:

Yes, I am pretty much an "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" diver. I do not believe in taking perfectly good parts out of a regulator and replacing them with hopefully as good parts.

I'm currently supporting a dozen regulators including wife's and daughter's so I'm really not interested in paying some tech about $100 each, every year, for basically unnecessary (and perhaps counterproductive) preventative maintenance.

When a regulator needs servicing, service it. If it does not need servicing, then dive it. But that does require that you learn more than just the manufacturers service recommendations. And you need to be prepared for the day when that little leak does finally pop up. If you don't have a spare regulator handy, you could always hope I'm on the boat also. I always carry at least one and don't mind lending it to divers who just had their regulator serviced before the trip.

mm2002
12-30-2008, 18:30
I carry more spare stuff on every dive trip than most people have in their entire kit. (don't believe me just ask anyone here I've been diving with.. LOL)

I'm going to step outside the boundaries of scuba diving here and say something that I apply to every day logic...........

If something bad can happen, it will....and at the worst possible moment. It is a law written long ago by some dude named Murphy. :smiley36:

.........Another saying that comes to mind is **** Happens.

USF_Diver
12-31-2008, 11:06
What is a good time frame I should follow for regulator service. Like every year or every 100 dives?

awap
12-31-2008, 11:23
What is a good time frame I should follow for regulator service. Like every year or every 100 dives?

Some manufacturers are now recommending a full service every 2 years or 100 dives with an inspection in the off years. To me, that makes much better sense than an annual service for quality regs that are well cared for and seeing less than 50 dives per year.

I still believe the best solution is to own at least 2 sets of regulators and learn to do your own inspections. I do inspections before each trip and at least twice a year on rigs I only use locally.

Key is usage and user care. If you allow salt deposits and corrosion to effect your regs, service more often than once a year may be required to restore performance and reliability.

bane51031
12-31-2008, 20:20
I also carry backups and take care of my gear, Have a good buddy who is lucky if he rinses his gear after a dive, so he is grateful i bring my possibles kit when we dive, One is none and two is one....

Reg
01-07-2009, 05:51
Thanks for all your comments.. I will take your advise and get the Reg's Serviced. Unfortunately here in OZ that means $168 AUD.

fireflock
01-07-2009, 08:00
I would have the reg that prompted the question serviced yesterday.

'If it ain't broke, don't fix it' only works if you know how to tell if things are broken. A lot of problems can be detected before something bad happens, but not by someone who doesn't know what they are looking for.

Even with superior care, parts will still need to be cleaned/replaced at some point.

BSea
01-07-2009, 14:11
I would have the reg that prompted the question serviced yesterday.

'If it ain't broke, don't fix it' only works if you know how to tell if things are broken. A lot of problems can be detected before something bad happens, but not by someone who doesn't know what they are looking for.

Even with superior care, parts will still need to be cleaned/replaced at some point.I think in many ways, that's what AWAP is saying. Getting a little bit of education on equipment that you depend on to keep you alive is a good thing. You don't have to be a mechanic to learn the basics about regulators & how to adjust the 1st & 2nd stages of your regs. And anyone who has more than 1 reg would do themselves a favor to either take a course on equipment, and/or get a book or 2 on how regulators work.

Here are a couple of good ones.

SCUBA REGULATOR MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR (http://www.airspeedpress.com/newregbook.html)

or

REGULATOR SAVVY (http://www.scubatools.com/p-603-regulator-savvy-spiral-bound.aspx)

I have the 1st one. I've not looked at the other one, but I heard that the 1st book is easier to understand. The 2nd book is sold by SCUBA TOOLS (http://www.scubatools.com/default.aspx). This is a new company that bought the name from the old company that marketed the tools under the same name. I have several of the tools from the old company, and they are all top quality well built tools. It looks as though the new company is producing the same quality, but I can't be sure since I've not bought anything from them . . . . YET.

This is not an endorsement of DIY equipment maintenance. Some of us have the inclination & desire, where others don't. But in this activity, ignorance is not bliss.

Since we are using automotive analagies, I would say that this ranks with being able to change a tire, or change your oil. Something I think everyone who owns a car should be able to do. You may not do it, but you should know how.

halocline
01-08-2009, 15:42
Compare the cost of servicing regulators regularly to a couple of days in the hospital.......or worse....a funeral.

This is a good one! Sounds like scary advertising copy :smiley29:

First, regulator failure underwater is not life threatening, or should not be. If you think it is, maybe you should re-acquaint yourself with some of the basic foundations of OW diving; the buddy system, alternate air sources, immediate access to the surface, etc.

Second, when regs fail, they almost always fail open, which means there's a constant flow of air. Remember, the reg's job is to regulate the flow of air, not supply air. The tank is doing that. Ever use a rental tank? Do you demand documentation about when it was last serviced?

Third, having a reg serviced is no guarantee that it is any less likely to fail. Guess what the qualifications for being a "professional" reg service tech are...an entire grueling 2 days of training, which nobody fails. Yep, right up there with brain surgery and aircraft landing. Sure, there are good techs; I would bet that scubatoys have a good one. But there are LOTS of bad ones, and it seems to be a crapshoot finding the good ones.

In the case of this reg, it looks to me like either the results of a really grungy tank, or more likely, it's not a stainless steel filter and the corrosion is from some salt water that dried on the reg. It's not necessarily indicative of impending reg failure. I'd want to inspect it, but if I knew it's history and it looked fine inside and held IP well, I'd dive with it.

mm2002
01-08-2009, 20:11
This is a good one! Sounds like scary advertising copy :smiley29:

First, regulator failure underwater is not life threatening, or should not be. If you think it is, maybe you should re-acquaint yourself with some of the basic foundations of OW diving; the buddy system, alternate air sources, immediate access to the surface, etc.

Second, when regs fail, they almost always fail open, which means there's a constant flow of air. Remember, the reg's job is to regulate the flow of air, not supply air. The tank is doing that. Ever use a rental tank? Do you demand documentation about when it was last serviced?

Third, having a reg serviced is no guarantee that it is any less likely to fail. Guess what the qualifications for being a "professional" reg service tech are...an entire grueling 2 days of training, which nobody fails. Yep, right up there with brain surgery and aircraft landing. Sure, there are good techs; I would bet that scubatoys have a good one. But there are LOTS of bad ones, and it seems to be a crapshoot finding the good ones.




So you're saying that a regulator failure absolutely cannot result in injury or death under any circumstances?

First of all, the above three paragraphs really insulted my intelligence. Thanks for that.:smiley20:
Second of all, my statement was to make a point.

The point is, every component of a scuba kit is a life support device. To take proper maintenance and regular servicing of any life support device lightly, isn't something I personally practice. You have to keep in mind that there are a lot of very new divers on this forum, and to send the message that regular servicing is stupid......well, you get the point (hopefully).

halocline
01-09-2009, 09:03
So you're saying that a regulator failure absolutely cannot result in injury or death under any circumstances?

First of all, the above three paragraphs really insulted my intelligence. Thanks for that.:smiley20:
Second of all, my statement was to make a point.

The point is, every component of a scuba kit is a life support device. To take proper maintenance and regular servicing of any life support device lightly, isn't something I personally practice. You have to keep in mind that there are a lot of very new divers on this forum, and to send the message that regular servicing is stupid......well, you get the point (hopefully).

Well, anything could result in death under the right circumstances. With that kind of reasoning, how could you ever possibly get into a car, an airplane, or even cross the street?

It was not my intention to insult your intelligence, but truthfully your point that I quoted was not very intelligent. It's nothing personal, sorry if it came out that way. Comparing the "price" of reg service and funeral costs is very silly when you think about it.

In terms of making a point for new divers, I'm glad you brought that up, because by far the most important safety point you could make to any new diver would be that it's diver behavior, not equipment, that is the "life support" of recreational diving. Why do you think we have the buddy system, air sharing drills, cesa, etc...and the most important, avoiding diving in situations where you do not have immediate access to the surface until you've been trained to handle them.

awap
01-09-2009, 10:44
The point is, every component of a scuba kit is a life support device. To take proper maintenance and regular servicing of any life support device lightly, isn't something I personally practice. You have to keep in mind that there are a lot of very new divers on this forum, and to send the message that regular servicing is stupid......well, you get the point (hopefully).

Ah yes, the life support cry. I don't use any scuba gear that I expect a failure would put my life in serious danger. Do you?

We are not saying that scuba gear should not be properly maintained and serviced when needed. We are really talking about what should be done and when. If you would rather not be bothered learning about your gear, then by all mean you should probably just follow the manufacturers' recommendations and hope you have a competent tech servicing your gear. Just be aware that following those recommendation is no guarantee that your diving will be trouble free as it is entirely possible that any given gear service may create more problems than it prevents.

If you are willing to make a small investment ($$) in gear and documentation and a bigger investment (time) in learning, you have some options that would allow you to have good reason to be confident in your gear, avoid unnecessary servicing and the problems it may create, and save enough money to purchase backup gear and more diving if you choose. This applies to both experienced divers and newer divers.

cummings66
01-10-2009, 10:34
First, regulator failure underwater is not life threatening, or should not be. If you think it is, maybe you should re-acquaint yourself with some of the basic foundations of OW diving; the buddy system, alternate air sources, immediate access to the surface, etc.


Many of the scuba deaths have occurred when a regulator failed, and a buddy was present. Why? Poor training. Often a diver panics when they lose their air and instinct instead of training takes over, they shoot to the surface, suffer an embolism and die. Bad things do happen due to poor training. Certain environments also do not allow for a direct ascent to the surface without risks, things like deco obligations or an overhead for example.

We don't know how this diver uses this regulator or his skill level. We must err on the side of caution due to that alone. Even good experienced divers panic once in a while. A regulator with obvious outside issues should always be checked into, it might be nothing but a check up would be warranted. I have seen worse regulator conditions and they worked, not mine though. Regarding a cylinder, yes, I do check it's history out as best I can. You should too. I am a certified cylinder inspector and know many shops cheat on it, but the bare basics a user can check and should check are the hydro, vip, and overall visual condition of the cylinder when they rent it. A VIP sticker means nothing, the cylinder could have been damaged right after the sticker got stuck on there, so get used to looking at the whole thing.

It's like I do on a preflight when I fly a strange plane. Sure, the logs say it's safe but I don't know what's happened to it after that. I go over it with a fine toothed comb to stack the deck in my favor. I consider diving to be similar to flying, you should preflight your gear. Check it as best you can before using it. I believe many of those checks can be done by a diver and that it's not always necessary for a shop to check them out. In cases of doubt, find somebody who knows something and ask them. If an experienced diver says get it looked at, if you don't know, then get it looked at. Here's how I do it, if I wonder if something is safe then I believe somebody smarter than me should look into it. If I wonder if a dive is doable by me then I don't do it. Always stack the deck in your favor using the skills you have at hand, and if you don't have them learn them. AWAP and MM2002 are both right, both depend on their skills they each have to see them through. Each has a different level of skill and comfort and so each has a different belief based on that. Yet at the core both are saying the same thing, AWAP would look at it himself because he knows what he's looking at. I fall between the two of them I think.

That said, the second book mentioned, Regulator Savy. I've read that one and it is good. There's a lot of theory in it and good basic knowledge. I have not read the first, so it's good to hear from somebody who has.

mm2002
01-10-2009, 11:17
AWAP and MM2002 are both right, both depend on their skills they each have to see them through. Each has a different level of skill and comfort and so each has a different belief based on that. Yet at the core both are saying the same thing, AWAP would look at it himself because he knows what he's looking at. I fall between the two of them I think.

Very good point. The training and experience level of the diver has a lot to do with their level of trust in their equipment. In my experience, it always seems like the "seasoned" divers are the ones that are more likely to toss their regs in the trunk of the car after a dive, right there in the pile with the rest of their gear.
Guys like me are still washing everything, drying, neatly rolling the hoses, putting everything in the correct storage containers, etc. I see it all the time. The difference is, the guy tossing the stuff in the trunk has been diving since they invented air, and knows that he's doing nothing to damage the gear. He trusts that it will work for a thousand more dives without failure, and knows exactly what to look for at a glance to prevent those failures. The difference in me and "that guy"? I haven't been diving long enough to trust my equipment as much, and I'm still anal about taking care of it. It's pretty simple if you think about it, and applies to a lot more things than just scuba diving.

For new divers though, I think every open water class should go just a little deeper into the mechanics of the gear, and simple maintenance procedures. How many newer divers do you know that periodically take the hoses off the first stage, and peer inside with a flashlight? How many bend and twist the hoses, checking for early signs of deterioration? How many shake their primary and octo checking for sand, gravel, debris? How many periodically take the cover off their primary and octo, and look inside? Matter of fact, the OP actually "noticed" that the filter was turning green! That means he was actually looking things over. That's good. Many that I've dove with never check anything, they just send it to the LDS once a year and figure that's all they need to do.

USF_Diver
01-13-2009, 19:04
Yeah the OW class should go over more about the gear and upkeep and such.

Zeagle Eagle
02-01-2009, 14:53
AWAP and MM2002 are both right, both depend on their skills they each have to see them through. Each has a different level of skill and comfort and so each has a different belief based on that. Yet at the core both are saying the same thing, AWAP would look at it himself because he knows what he's looking at. I fall between the two of them I think.

Very good point. The training and experience level of the diver has a lot to do with their level of trust in their equipment. In my experience, it always seems like the "seasoned" divers are the ones that are more likely to toss their regs in the trunk of the car after a dive, right there in the pile with the rest of their gear.
Guys like me are still washing everything, drying, neatly rolling the hoses, putting everything in the correct storage containers, etc. I see it all the time. The difference is, the guy tossing the stuff in the trunk has been diving since they invented air, and knows that he's doing nothing to damage the gear. He trusts that it will work for a thousand more dives without failure, and knows exactly what to look for at a glance to prevent those failures. The difference in me and "that guy"? I haven't been diving long enough to trust my equipment as much, and I'm still anal about taking care of it. It's pretty simple if you think about it, and applies to a lot more things than just scuba diving.

I have been diving a long time and still don't "trust" my gear. I meticulously clean my gear and then pack it properly after every dive trip. Prior, to a dive trip I inspect it again and make sure it is packed properly for travel. I get my regs professionally serviced by a guy I trust every 2-3 years. The rest of my stuff I service myself. I have never (in 30 years of diving) had a serious equipment failure using that procedure.