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Axewizard
01-13-2009, 19:30
I will be letting her use mine to ask a few questions, as she will be taking the OW course in April and getting her JR OW. She wanted to jump on here and ask questions (obviously her old man doesn't have a clue as I've only been certified since 1991).

Anyhoo...here she goes.

She wants to know what a safety stop is.

medic001918
01-13-2009, 19:34
A safety stop is a stop that many view as mandatory after a dive. The stop is generally held at 10-15 ft. deep for three to five minutes to allow for off-gassing from the nitrogen that you've built up during the dive. The safety stop is good practice and a chance to work on your buoyancy skills.

The stop is not mandatory since you're not doing decompression diving, but it is a good practice and offers a margin of safety.

Shane

Axewizard
01-13-2009, 20:00
i have another question. is it scary going on a night dive?

cummings66
01-13-2009, 20:00
In the old days a safety stop wasn't even used, it's only been a more recent thing for it to be taught in training.

I was taught 15 feet for the stop. My computer will start the countdown at 20 feet when I tell it 15 feet deep for some trivia. The stop is a good place to hang out and practice horizontal trim and non movement, play a couple games of tic tac toe if you have a place, and just relax.

It's not mandatory for any diving depths she will be doing but is a good procedure to get in the habit of doing. Many adults claim they feel better after a days diving when they include safety stops.

cummings66
01-13-2009, 20:01
Night dives are not scary, fun in fact because you get to see the fish do things they would not normally do in the daylight. I like them.

Axewizard
01-13-2009, 20:01
This is Axe...saphire's dad...I've done the night dive gig in Coz, but I need some help convincing her that it is one of the most awesome experiences that's she'll ever have...help!

Axewizard
01-13-2009, 20:05
Night dives are not scary, fun in fact because you get to see the fish do things they would not normally do in the daylight. I like them.

this is saphire now... its not the fact that i am in the water it is the fact of going in. So i need to know if it is scary going in the water!

Vercingetorix
01-13-2009, 20:13
Not really scary. it is a cardinal rule that you do your night dive where you previously did a day dive. Therefore, you know what to expect. Stay close to your buddy; that provides reassurance and an opportunity to share experiences when you emerge. You'll have three lights (main, backup, tank) so you'll have plenty of light. You should also fully discuss your dive plan with your buddy.

Will you feel nervous going in? Yes. The fact that you're asking that question indicates that you will be. Acknowledge it, then jump right in (literally). I was nervous on my first night dive. It does feel kinda spooky. But once you see all the cool things, you'll lose the fear.

Axewizard
01-13-2009, 20:16
thank you very much for your help. I appreciate it very much.

saphire

WaScubaDude
01-13-2009, 20:17
Night diving, like daytime diving, can be a bit scarry. A night dive gives a diver the opportunity to overcome some of that irrational fear that we all have. A big part of being a good diver is over coming this irrational fear and working at understanding and being able to respond well to the "real" risks while diving.

All that said, I had to do a dozen night dives before I could really relax and not feel like the boogy man, or jaws was going to get me. You can probably get comfortable a lot quicker than 12 night dives.

Enjoy your dives, whatever they may be! And good for you for continueing to learn.

Axewizard
01-14-2009, 06:01
Thanks for all of your advice. I can't wait until she gets certified so we can add another dive buddy to the family!

SkuaSeptember
01-14-2009, 07:33
Glad to see another youngin' on the board - my daughter reads through but tends to feel like she is the only one her age around the boards. I'll see if see can offer some insight when she gets home from school.
As far as the safety stop goes I find that most kids of an age to dive are also starting to look forward to driving within a few short years so I explain it as being similar to approaching a stop sign. If you plan to stop a car length or so back and then gently roll up to the intersection, it dramatically reduces the chances of an accident caused by moving into the path of oncoming traffic or of being rear ended and pushed into the intersection. Two lessons in one.

Vercingetorix
01-14-2009, 08:24
BTW, Miss Saphire doesn't have to wait to be certified before creating her own profile here on the forum. Other soon-to-be-divers have been on the site to ask questions and assuage concerns.

Axewizard
01-14-2009, 14:51
I'm just waiting on the guys to set her up. She's got a profile, but it isn't active yet. I had to send in the permission form for her. I would imagine that she'll be on here quite a bit. She's full of questions, nerves, and excitement. I just hope she enjoys diving as much as I do! :)

Axe

ektess1
01-14-2009, 18:59
Just remember to take all the advice with caution. Just like anything else on the internet, being suspicious can be a healthy trait.
Enjoy the adventure. There are a lot of knowledgeable and friendly people in this forum.
Good luck.

fireblossom4
02-10-2009, 16:46
i have another question. is it scary going on a night dive?
ive only been on one night dive so far but it wasnt scary at all, except that i was sort of afraid of running into an urchin or something cause my dad had told me before that on his first night dive a current came and he jammed his knee into a sea urchin, man that had to hurt, anyways my night dive was a manta dive in hawaii and it was the coolest thing, i had a great time and all the flashlights give it more of a dreamy look than scary, heres a video of a manta dive if youve never seen one
YouTube - Manta Ray Night Dive, Hawaii (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u97enNgNksc&feature=related)
wonderful dive, its a really up-close and personal experience, they almost brush your face with their undersides
they do all kinds of flips and stuff, all those plankton tickled my hands (:

MSilvia
02-10-2009, 16:56
So i need to know if it is scary going in the water!
One way you can make a night dive without the possibility of a scary entry is to begin the dive at sunset. You get to get everything set up while it's still light, get in the water while it's still a little light, and do most of your dive when the night time creatures have come out to play.

fireblossom4
02-10-2009, 17:00
Night dives are not scary, fun in fact because you get to see the fish do things they would not normally do in the daylight. I like them.

this is saphire now... its not the fact that i am in the water it is the fact of going in. So i need to know if it is scary going in the water!
i hate to say it but i do feel sick in the stomach going in, but only because the tank is so darn heavy (im 14 and not muscled in any way:smiley5:) but some times i just put my bc on in the water and theres no problem, but just recently i got a shoulder injury from the tank so from now on im puttingon the bc in the water all the time
another thing is that every time i dive when i first put the regulator in my mouth the air is so dry that i cough for awhile including about half of my descent but thats not much of a problem
but besides those couple of things its no problemo:smiley_bucktooth:

MSilvia
02-10-2009, 17:42
another thing is that every time i dive when i first put the regulator in my mouth the air is so dry that i cough for awhile including about half of my descent
If you drink a lot of water in the hours leading up to the dive, it'll really help with that.

heydn62
02-11-2009, 02:00
You'll have three lights (main, backup, tank) so you'll have plenty of light.

I'm still learning and I've not done a night dive. I've not heard of a tank light. Is this just to make sure others can see you?

ektess1
02-11-2009, 08:39
The tank light is so everybody can keep track of each other. It does not need to be anything fancy nor bright. In fact it should not be bright. You can also use different colored light. That way you can keep track of individuals.

Vercingetorix
02-11-2009, 09:22
You'll have three lights (main, backup, tank) so you'll have plenty of light.

I'm still learning and I've not done a night dive. I've not heard of a tank light. Is this just to make sure others can see you?

The tank light is so everybody can keep track of each other. It does not need to be anything fancy nor bright. In fact it should not be bright. You can also use different colored light. That way you can keep track of individuals.

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I use the Glo-Toobs

Scout
02-13-2009, 12:02
I agree with taking a day dive in the same place you'll later take the night dive. Being comfortable with the "lay of the land" really helped me and my son in our first night dives. It also gives you a chance to check out all the hiding spots that the cool creatures might like to hang out in.

We found that the critters really didn't care much about us; we were just visiting their neighborhood and they were just getting along with life.

Don't forget not to shine your lights directly in the eye's of any creature (including fellow divers!). Let the beam shine just to the side of them so you can see them in the outer edge of light.

MSilvia
02-13-2009, 12:35
I'm still learning and I've not done a night dive. I've not heard of a tank light. Is this just to make sure others can see you?
Yeah, that's what they're for, and not everyone uses them. Some charter boats might require it, but when I shore dive with friends, we've found that our primary and backup lights do an excellent job of marking our positions. Of course, there usually aren't 20 people in the water when we do that.