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View Full Version : Have you upchucked under water? or wimped to the gallows of the boat.



emt
01-22-2009, 00:16
This Man Law's forum looks like the right place for this... My rule is it's ok to throw up as long as you don't ask me to go back to shore. Well, I abided by my rule as it was first given to me by capt. Bill. We went out about 28 years ago in a 18foot in small craft warning and I kept going freediving and then it came on a descent. It was a really weird feeling going thru the snorkle and surprisingly easier than doing it in the air from the boat. Nice & Smooth. Who else has tried it?

We probably need a safety thread to list safety in perceived order: 1.Bed (probably lol) 2. rocking chair 3. office 4.boat 5.car 6.under water scuba diving 7.underwater freediving 8.spearfishing as 6 to 7 etc.etc.etc. Problem is if you stay home & do nothing the bones demineralize and muscles waste and your a goner sooner than you think. Oh well, "life is a risk" choose your risks & life choices accordingly.

I didn't plan on starting a safety issue; Just a man's law forum of go as long as you can thru pain etc. as most men have & I'm happy to see some gals have too. If you go as long as you can this can happen. It wasn't bad for me, how about you?

Diver Kat
01-22-2009, 01:00
LOL ... I'd always heard it was no problem blowing chunks thru your regulator, and discovered that was true my last Florida trip .... MY problem? Too many people on the boat talking about rough seas and hurling the day before, made me queasy. The power of suggestion is a killer! Add to that a real strong surge at depth, and I was a goner .... :smiley11:

Lone Frogman
01-22-2009, 05:24
Blowing chunks is not the problem, its the gasp for air after.

chicken
01-22-2009, 06:25
I haven't tried it...yet. As long as I stay away from anyone else doing it I am fine. One whiff of that pungent smell and I will run to the side of the boat.

Daz
01-22-2009, 08:17
Your boat has a gallows?

Vercingetorix
01-22-2009, 08:30
Your boat has a gallows?My thought exactly. I'm guessing, yardarm.

I guess it's used on divers who heave, then demand to be returned to shore. Ya leave'em dangling from the yardarm as a warning to all others.

JCAT
01-22-2009, 08:56
Living in South Carolina, I've never done a shore dive. Our coast is mostly sand for many miles out to sea. Neither of us has ever been seasick, but we've been on trips where nearly everyone was hanging over the rails.

Here's some things we've seen people do that may need to be avoided.

1. Don't sit at the back of the boat sucking in diesel fumes.
2. Try to sit in the middle of the boat to avoid feeling the wave action.
3. Don't over eat or eat anything you normally would not eat at home. If you have only toast for breakfast at home, then stick with that.
4. Hydrate and bring a hat to keep the sun off, especially if your already vacation sun burnt.
5. Not a good idea to party until 2:00am and then get on a boat at 7:00am for a three hour ride in 3-4 foot swells. Get plenty of rest the night before.
6. Relax and chill, no reason to be stressed. I've seen people get seasick over stress alone.
7. If someone on the boat gets sick, don't focus on them or the sounds their making. Sometimes this can start a chain reaction. Grab iPod and ignore. If you catch the smell, move to a different area of the boat.
8. When you surface after a dive, do not take the regulator out of your mouth in high swells. Drinking salt water can bring on sea sickness.
9. If you need to throw up, don't use the head if boat is equipped. Just hang over the downwind side. No need to be embarrassed and the fish will like you much.
10. If you know your prone to seasickness, find something that works for you like dramamine or the like.

cheers

Black-Gorrilla
01-22-2009, 09:09
Blowing chunks is not the problem, its the gasp for air after.


I guess that's why they mention to keep your reg in and barf trough it, not to take it out cause it'll help you drown if you do.

Black-Gorrilla
01-22-2009, 09:10
Jcat, you forgot this

11. Go for distance

emt
01-22-2009, 12:25
Your boat has a gallows?
No, Just quickly wrote something, how's bilge of the boat.


But but I do like ricks idea: " I guess it's used on divers who heave, then demand to be returned to shore. Ya leave'em dangling from the yardarm as a warning to all others." lol

emt
01-22-2009, 12:41
Blowing chunks is not the problem, its the gasp for air after.
I was actually freediving when it occurred and I had only a snorkel full of water with no air in it. It was really weird because I was concerned about the air gasp also but that did not occur. i had no desire to inhale air. If I had had my snorkel out of my mouth, I'm certain it would have been the same feeling. Automatic closure of the airway with no ability to open it, stomach to esophagus to mouth to ocean were as one. all fluid moving with no air in between. A really neat (once in a lifetime) feeling. It was really a pretty cool feeling. No problems and no desire for air during the upchuck, one smooth movement of liquid.

Be safe & stay in the boat. Be safer & stay home. Make sure you pass your open water certification and Know how to pull your reg from your mouth & buddy breathe before diving with scuba.

P.S. Do not dive if taking drugs or alcohol which may impare your central and peripheral nervous system. The peripheral nervous system is composed of the somatic & autonomic subdivisions. The autonomic subdivision will not function adequately under inebriation and reflexes will be delayed or lacking (especially once pronounced dead). The somatic ability to handle your reg with your muscles will also decrease if inebriated...Trying to think of any other warnings I should list....but am considering a glass of wine instead.....

No Misses
01-22-2009, 12:56
emt, I do not agree with your statement "pull the reg out and let it go". The safest way is to puke through your reg. You do not want someone to drown because they followed your advice. JM2c

68raggtop
01-22-2009, 14:35
I have hurled through the regulator before and can tell you that it was a conscious decision to keep it in. I knew my training said to keep it in, but another part of my brain said, take it out. I decided to keep it in thinking if I plugged it, I could use the octo. It works surprisingly well. My buddy (wife) didn't even know it happened until I told her back on the boat.

caroln
01-22-2009, 14:56
Keeping your reg in, the next breath is pretty gnarly. If any of your chunks didn't quite make it all the way out, you're sucking them back in, not to mention the taste of your puke breath. Not the altogether more pleasant thing in the world.

Diver Kat
01-22-2009, 15:08
Keeping your reg in, the next breath is pretty gnarly. If any of your chunks didn't quite make it all the way out, you're sucking them back in, not to mention the taste of your puke breath. Not the altogether more pleasant thing in the world.
Okay ... this made me quesy just reading it!!

I will say - in my case - the brain remained in working order and I hit the purge after each 'session.' (There was more than one!) So there was no issue of inhalation of stuff or fumes or anything ....and the spouse, who was leading, was clueless during the whole event. He didn't know till I told him back on the boat either!

ektess1
01-22-2009, 17:12
I think that most everybody has done this a time or two. I don't enjoy it, but I concider it no more nasty than a snotty nose.

Black-Gorrilla
01-22-2009, 17:19
emt, I do not agree with your statement "pull the reg out and let it go". The safest way is to puke through your reg. You do not want someone to drown because they followed your advice. JM2c

I agree, maybe you did not have the reflex, but someone might, and it would be bad to catch a lung full of water

Tell them about the magic cookies.

emt
01-22-2009, 17:23
emt, I do not agree with your statement "pull the reg out and let it go". The safest way is to puke through your reg. You do not want someone to drown because they followed your advice. JM2c
Wow, I thought everyone still had to know how to buddy breathe just to pass open water certification. Buddy breathing is definitely pulling your reg from your mouth. I hope everyone goes back for recertification if they missed that or just stay in the boat.


But, back to safety: yes it would be safer to upchuck in the boat. It would be even safer to stay home. I will believe your statement that it would also be safer to upchuck thru the reg but I would not choose to do so if I ever have the choice in the future. If your ever freediving and this happens while you are under water I guess I'll have to talk that way, ok: It is really strange water from the stomach pushing the ocean water out of its way with no air in between to be compressed. Gives me a little idea of the underwater delivery process some women choose.

I didn't plan on starting a safety issue; Just a man's law forum of go as long as you can thru pain etc. as most men have & I'm happy to see some gals have too. If you go as long as you can this can happen. It wasn't bad for me, how about you?

emt
01-22-2009, 17:47
Keeping your reg in, the next breath is pretty gnarly. If any of your chunks didn't quite make it all the way out, you're sucking them back in, not to mention the taste of your puke breath. Not the altogether more pleasant thing in the world.
Okay ... this made me quesy just reading it!!

I will say - in my case - the brain remained in working order and I hit the purge after each 'session.' (There was more than one!) So there was no issue of inhalation of stuff or fumes or anything ....and the spouse, who was leading, was clueless during the whole event. He didn't know till I told him back on the boat either!
Way to go Diver kat,,,Love seeing the gals lasting as long as us guys. (or longer...)

Well I had no reg as I was freediving but I agree that upchucking thru the reg might "mess it up" a bit.
As I said it was real smooth for me with no additional air available it just flowed right out.

emt
01-22-2009, 19:47
Blowing chunks is not the problem, its the gasp for air after.

I'm really curious about the gasp for air??? I of course had my lungs full of air before going underwater freediving and had no "gasp for air" as my lungs were full, I'm assuming you were diving with a reg and just exhaled thru it prior to the upchuck instead of inhaling prior to the upchuck, do you remember???

emt
01-22-2009, 19:56
Reflex interaction of pharynx, esophagus, and airways

Reza Shaker, M.D.

About the contributor (http://www.nature.com/gimo/contents/pt1/authors/gimo11.html)
View article related content (http://www.nature.com/gimo/contents/pt1/full/gimo11.html#relatedcontent)

Top of page (http://www.nature.com/gimo/contents/pt1/full/gimo11.html#top) Key Points



There is a close functional relationship between the upper gastrointestinal tract and the airway, which ensures the safety of the airway against aspiration of material in transit through the pharyngoesophageal axis
Reflex interaction of pharynx, esophagus, and airways : GI Motility online (http://www.nature.com/gimo/contents/pt1/full/gimo11.html) A really cool article but extremely long about reflex actions of the trachea and esophagus to stimulation.

sabbath999
01-24-2009, 21:17
I barfed 4 times my first open ocean dive trip.

I was feeling a bit queasy going out, but when I got in the water I was fine. We went down to 112 on AL80's, so the dive was pretty short (32 minutes) and when I cam up, the second I got my head out of the water on the ladder I "talked to earl"... Man I had a crowd of fish all over me before I could even get out. We had an hour and a half of surface intervals, just sitting on that boat rolling about... it was not pleasant, and I made chowder 2 more times... Once I hit the water on the second dive, the instant I got in I went down a couple feet and waited for them and I was absolutely fine. I blew it again when I hit the ladder.

The next day I was dram'ed up and ready for it, and the rest of the week I didn't even get nauseous once.

We were doing our AOW and our instructor was a babe... she was HOT... so I was really proud how I impressed her my first day there.

Diver Kat
01-25-2009, 00:50
Blowing chunks is not the problem, its the gasp for air after.

I'm really curious about the gasp for air??? I of course had my lungs full of air before going underwater freediving and had no "gasp for air" as my lungs were full, I'm assuming you were diving with a reg and just exhaled thru it prior to the upchuck instead of inhaling prior to the upchuck, do you remember???
I think LF is referring to when you're sick - under normal circumstances - your system tries to do a major purge of whatever is in your stomach (which feels like it takes forever!) and then you just take a big gasp of air. I'm guessing because these situations are caused by nausea and seasickness, and not by true illness or something like food poisoning, the hurling isn't as violent. I know for me it wasn't, and therefore was no real 'gasp' for air. (Not like when I had food poisoning! I was lucky I got to breathe at all for a few hours!)

Cheddarchick
01-25-2009, 17:54
B-G...Magic cookies???? are you speaking of ginger snaps??? I am a chummer, big time....always feel better at depth...That bobbing about on the surface sux.....That's why we go to Curacao...no boat dives if you don't want to...

fldiver
01-30-2009, 19:12
Never have been even nauseated. I would be a great astronaut. Impossible to make me seasick or any motion sickness. I always eat at least a sandwich while diving or equivalent. No problems.

Zeagle Eagle
02-01-2009, 15:48
If you feel sick underwater, use your buddies octo! After all what are buddies for?

Sansho
02-01-2009, 17:41
Asides from the earlier advice, take ginger in pill form. I recently dove on the Yongala in Australia, which is a 2.25+ hour boat ride in choppy water. Many cautions about addressing sea sickness, so I took a ginger pill before going to bed and another in the morning. No issues. Particular variety used is Nature's Bounty brand ginger root, 550 mg.