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roby jeff
01-22-2009, 07:55
I found this realy unusual soft coral??? It is quite large, I loved the weird shape . I've never seen anything quite like it. If anyone knows anything about it let me know. Far north Queensland Australia in sheltered shallow water. http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/1/0/3/5/0/2008_08_04s,a___rj_203_copy.jpg

DevilDiver
01-22-2009, 08:16
Not that I know much (if anything) about this area but I would research sponges rather than soft corals to find an ID for this. Try the Leucettidae family (Leucetta chagosensis, : (http://sealifebase.org/Summary/SpeciesSummary.php?id=87531)).

With more than 10,000 species sponges are very diverse and can be difficult to ID.

You could try to email the photo to a pro or group for help with this.
Collaborator Profile - Dar, Christine (http://sealifebase.org/Collaborators/CollaboratorSummary.php?ID=3)

Maybe your photo will benefit future research helping others ID this......

gNats
01-22-2009, 08:40
Does anyone else think it looks like pig snouts?

mocepts
01-22-2009, 08:47
Does anyone else think it looks like pig snouts?


I was gonna say a newborn pig....

DevilDiver
01-22-2009, 10:16
I found this realy unusual soft coral??? It is quite large, I loved the weird shape . I've never seen anything quite like it. If anyone knows anything about it let me know. Far north Queensland Australia in sheltered shallow water. http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/1/0/3/5/0/2008_08_04s,a___rj_203_copy.jpg


Possible some kind of encrusting or hydrocoral that has overtaken a branching coral to give it this appearance. From the photo it does not appear to have polyps witch would lead you to guess this would be some form of spounge.

If possible you should get a closer inspection for ID.

roby jeff
01-22-2009, 16:27
Thz devil diver, just read up on the sponges and i think you are correct.
Its great to learn new things.
I'll talk with the lizard island marine reseach centre when i'm there later in the year to confirm. My reef books do say how difficult it is to identify individual sponges just by a picture, In the mean time i'll call it "PIG SNOUT SPONGE"
cheers rob

DevilDiver
01-22-2009, 17:03
"Sus snout peniculus" it is!!

If the Marine research center figures it out please post, just out of curiosity........

Aussie
01-26-2009, 16:10
I believe it actually might be a soft coral under shock of some sort. Water temp change or maybe something touched it can trigger it. They withdraw their Polyps inside themselves which give the pig snout look.

You see this often with Anemones.

Regards Mark

Aussie
01-26-2009, 16:11
its more likely to be the soft coral which you see open in the bottom left of the pic.

roby jeff
01-28-2009, 00:37
thats interesting mark, i'll let you know if i get a definitive answere from lizard
cheers rob

roby jeff
01-28-2009, 20:33
Curiosity got the better of me so I emailed the reseach centre and here is there response...the definitive answere.


From: Anne Hoggett [mailto:lirs@bigpond.com]
Sent: Thursday, 29 January 2009 1:21 PM
To: 'Rob
Subject: RE: IDENTIFICATION ASSISTANCE REQUEST

Hi Rob

The three colonies in your photo are definitely soft corals. They are actually a very common ones called Sarcophyton. The polyps are withdrawn but I donít think that has anything to do with shock or trauma - it is not at all uncommon to see them that way. There is another colony of the same thing with its polyps out in the bottom left of your photo. Hope this helps!

Regards,
Anne
Dr Anne Hoggett & Dr Lyle VailDirectors, Lizard Island Research StationAustralian Museum
Lizard Island Research StationPMB 37 Cairns QLD 4870 Australia t 61 7 4060 3977 f 61 7 4060 3977 www.lizardisland.net.au
Inspiring the exploration of nature and cultures

DevilDiver
01-28-2009, 20:38
Curiosity got the better of me so I emailed the reseach centre and here is there response...the definitive answere.

From: Anne Hoggett [mailto:lirs@bigpond.com]
Sent: Thursday, 29 January 2009 1:21 PM
To: 'Rob
Subject: RE: IDENTIFICATION ASSISTANCE REQUEST

Hi Rob

The three colonies in your photo are definitely soft corals. They are actually a very common ones called Sarcophyton. The polyps are withdrawn but I donít think that has anything to do with shock or trauma - it is not at all uncommon to see them that way. There is another colony of the same thing with its polyps out in the bottom left of your photo. Hope this helps!

Regards,
Anne
Dr Anne Hoggett & Dr Lyle VailDirectors, Lizard Island Research StationAustralian Museum
Lizard Island Research StationPMB 37 Cairns QLD 4870 Australia t 61 7 4060 3977 f 61 7 4060 3977 www.lizardisland.net.au
Inspiring the exploration of nature and cultures

Very cool.... Great follow through!

Aussie
01-29-2009, 15:33
So was I half right???

roby jeff
01-30-2009, 08:20
yes mark, well done..you win the coral quizz... although a pessimist might say you were half wrong!!

roby jeff
01-31-2009, 17:19
This is what this soft coral looks like when the polyps are not with drawn. Now i know what i'm looking at I found it was listed in my "indo pacific coral reef field guide ". Thanks all for your help everyone. I will be looking out for more withdrawn Sarophyton in future and will be quite ecited when i find them.
http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/1/0/3/5/0/scan0001.jpg

Straegen
01-31-2009, 17:34
Coral is known as a Leather coral. I think someone correctly ID it above by its latin name. Had a similar one in my tank for a while.

roby jeff
01-31-2009, 18:10
Thanks Straegen, Leather coral is a bit easier to remember . Heres another soft coral i particularily liked . It was by itself between coral bommies in 15 meters..what would you call it in simple terms...spaghetti, tree??? aNY IDEAS ANYONE?

http://forum.scubatoys.com/gallery/files/1/0/3/5/0/2008_05_31susan___robin_225_copy.jpg

DevilDiver
01-31-2009, 19:14
Looks like Fire Coral that has over taken some kind of branching coral....

Straegen
02-01-2009, 00:02
It is really hard to tell without a good close up. It could be a Staghorn Acropora or as previously noted Fire Coral. If it is a Fire Coral it is really a hydrozoid kind of a cross between a coral and a jelly fish and not an actual coral. The easiest way to tell is to touch it... just kidding... get a close up of the surface. If it appears smooth with very tiny pinholes, probably a Fire Coral. Fire Coral can be very hard to id until it is too late since it comes in many forms.