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View Full Version : Nikon unveils Coolpix P90 24X superzoom 2-3-2009



DevilDiver
02-03-2009, 07:57
The newest addition to the land of advanced point and shoot digitals......

Nikon unveils Coolpix P90 24X superzoom
Tuesday, 3 February 2009 04:00 GMT

http://a.img-dpreview.com/reviews/images/nikon_cpp90.gif

Nikon has unveiled the Coolpix P90 superzoom with 24x optical zoom. With 26mm - 624mm (35mm equiv.) zoom range this superzoom camera sports a 12.1 MP sensor, 3.0 inch tilting LCD and includes manual and auto features such as Scene Auto Selector, Smile Mode, Blink warning and P/A/S/M exposure modes. In addition, continuous shooting mode can deliver 45 images at 15 fps, with images being recorded before pressing the shutter button.

sabbath999
02-05-2009, 10:09
Hmmm...

Not really all that much of an upgrade over the D80.

Bigger zoom range, which can be good or bad (depending on how much image distortion is added by the extra range), JPEG only, no HD video, but a bigger and better screen is good.

15 FPS & 45 burst... While fun, I wonder how many people will actually use this feature?

Still, depending on the image quality, this is an impressive camera for what looks to be somewhere around the $400 level.

CompuDude
02-05-2009, 15:32
True, although considering what the housing is going to cost, for UW use you'd be better off just getting a D90, which will give much better performance and flexibility.

DevilDiver
02-05-2009, 17:49
True, although considering what the housing is going to cost, for UW use you'd be better off just getting a D90, which will give much better performance and flexibility.


Errr..ahh?

The D90 (Just the body-no lenses) is going for $800-900. The Ike housing is around $1,300-1,500. Then you look at lenses and ports......... say around $3000 on the lite side.

The point of the OP ws really not that this camera was the hottest thing going. Really thought some people would be interested in the super zoom lenses (624mm!!) being offered on some of the newer P&S cameras.

Canon SX 10 28-560mm
Fujifilm S2000HD 28-414mm
Fujifilm S8100fd 27-486mm
Nikon P80 27-486mm
Olympus SP-565 26-520mm
Panasonic FZ28 27-486mm
Sony H50 31-465mm



Sorry, I did not intend to plug the Nikon P90 product...

CompuDude
02-05-2009, 18:00
I hear you, and don't disagree. What's the housing going to cost on this P90, though? I suspect similar to full DSLR prices, which was my main point.

Or... do they even make housings for the P90 yet? If not, while interesting for topside use, there's no much point to it on a scuba site. ;) If you stated of interest for topside only, sorry, I missed that part. No offense intended, tho

DevilDiver
02-05-2009, 18:31
Or... do they even make housings for the P90 yet? If not, while interesting for topside use, there's no much point to it on a scuba site. ;) If you stated of interest for topside only, sorry, I missed that part. No offense intended, tho

It is not released yet so we will have to wait and see.... probably should have composed the post different. Still 624mm is impressive....

Housings for the Canon G9 & G10 were released with a wide $$ range, $199 low end - top end $1,400 but I do not believe a camera like the P90 would be in the G9, G10 category.

Nemrod
02-05-2009, 23:03
Anything with more than a 4X zoom is problematic for an underwater camera unless macro is your only interest.

N

scubadiver888
02-06-2009, 07:55
I was checking this out on the Nikon website. It wasn't clear what format the images are saved in. Sabbath999, where did you see it was JPEG only? I liked the fact the P6000 shoots in RAW. I tried finding the user manual online but it is not there. When is the camera actually available? Is there a 'usual' time manufacturers release things?

Seems a lot like the P6000 but a MUCH larger range on the lens. I think if I'm going for something with this lens range I'd probably go for a real DSLR with bayonet mounted lens. For example, the D200. I'd question how good the lens is. 26-625mm range and the whole thing is supposed to be around $500?

scubadiver888
02-06-2009, 07:58
True, although considering what the housing is going to cost, for UW use you'd be better off just getting a D90, which will give much better performance and flexibility.
The D90 is going to cost a lot more however. To get a D90 with a 26-625mm range you are going to have to go for multiple lens. Even a bad lens going to 625mm is going to add a LOT more to the price of the kit.

scubadiver888
02-06-2009, 08:03
Anything with more than a 4X zoom is problematic for an underwater camera unless macro is your only interest.

N
Problematic how? Is it that the larger zoom suffers from camera shake?

CompuDude
02-06-2009, 13:14
True, although considering what the housing is going to cost, for UW use you'd be better off just getting a D90, which will give much better performance and flexibility.
The D90 is going to cost a lot more however. To get a D90 with a 26-625mm range you are going to have to go for multiple lens. Even a bad lens going to 625mm is going to add a LOT more to the price of the kit.

Certainly it will cost more, but tell me this: What purpose does a 625mm lens serve underwater?

If someone wants this for topside, I'm all for it, looks fab. My points were solely focused on underwater use, where any zoom over 2x (70mm at 35mm equiv) is pretty much a complete waste.

scubadiver888
02-06-2009, 14:06
True, although considering what the housing is going to cost, for UW use you'd be better off just getting a D90, which will give much better performance and flexibility.
The D90 is going to cost a lot more however. To get a D90 with a 26-625mm range you are going to have to go for multiple lens. Even a bad lens going to 625mm is going to add a LOT more to the price of the kit.

Certainly it will cost more, but tell me this: What purpose does a 625mm lens serve underwater?

If someone wants this for topside, I'm all for it, looks fab. My points were solely focused on underwater use, where any zoom over 2x (70mm at 35mm equiv) is pretty much a complete waste.
To be honest, I have no idea what a 625mm lens would do underwater. Could be useful in the Caribbean? I know here in Ontario, unless you are ice diving, your viz is going to be too short to use anything beyond a 70mm.

I tend to look for something that would be good topside as well. I like to have something to do street photography at home, vacation photos when I'm not diving and sporting events (dog sports). Did not think about your perspective, sorry.

Nemrod
02-07-2009, 01:30
Anything with more than a 4X zoom is problematic for an underwater camera unless macro is your only interest.

N
Problematic how? Is it that the larger zoom suffers from camera shake?


The long zoom ratio lens requires a long port. Long ports make mounting wet mount external wide angle lenses difficult because they need to be close to the camera native lens. The long port sits the wet mount lens out so far that severe vignetting makes it essentially unworkable. "Zoom" lenses are fine for terrestrial use, underwater you need a short focal length lens and to work with a wet mount lens it needs to be very close to the housing port.

Why camera and housing manufacturers do not understand this simple fact is beyond me. Wide angle, more than a 90 degree field of view is a necessity for underwater use for anything but macro crap.

N

CompuDude
02-07-2009, 02:03
Wide angle, more than a 90 degree field of view is a necessity for underwater use for anything but macro crap.

Excuse me... macro "crap"?

:smiley13:

:smiley21:

Nemrod
02-07-2009, 10:37
Wide angle, more than a 90 degree field of view is a necessity for underwater use for anything but macro crap.

Excuse me... macro "crap"?

:smiley13:

:smiley21:

Some see the trees, others see the forest. :smiley20:

N

scubadiver888
02-07-2009, 11:08
Anything with more than a 4X zoom is problematic for an underwater camera unless macro is your only interest.

N
Problematic how? Is it that the larger zoom suffers from camera shake?


The long zoom ratio lens requires a long port. Long ports make mounting wet mount external wide angle lenses difficult because they need to be close to the camera native lens. The long port sits the wet mount lens out so far that severe vignetting makes it essentially unworkable. "Zoom" lenses are fine for terrestrial use, underwater you need a short focal length lens and to work with a wet mount lens it needs to be very close to the housing port.

Why camera and housing manufacturers do not understand this simple fact is beyond me. Wide angle, more than a 90 degree field of view is a necessity for underwater use for anything but macro crap.

N
Thanks Nemrod. I've been reading other sites about this stuff. I just noticed that strobe distances halve underwater, i.e. if you have a strobe good for 50' on land, it will tend to be good for 25' underwater. Also, what I would consider a wide angle lens is 'normal' underwater, e.g. 28mm underwater is a kit lens where as 50mm on land is a kit lens. I guess a 625mm lens would be narrow focus plus the wouldn't be enough light either.

scubadiver888
02-07-2009, 11:09
Wide angle, more than a 90 degree field of view is a necessity for underwater use for anything but macro crap.

Excuse me... macro "crap"?

:smiley13:

:smiley21:
I plan on doing macro 'crap'. I'm okay with Nemrod not being interested in it. :smiley2:

Nemrod
02-07-2009, 11:44
Anything with more than a 4X zoom is problematic for an underwater camera unless macro is your only interest.

N
Problematic how? Is it that the larger zoom suffers from camera shake?


The long zoom ratio lens requires a long port. Long ports make mounting wet mount external wide angle lenses difficult because they need to be close to the camera native lens. The long port sits the wet mount lens out so far that severe vignetting makes it essentially unworkable. "Zoom" lenses are fine for terrestrial use, underwater you need a short focal length lens and to work with a wet mount lens it needs to be very close to the housing port.

Why camera and housing manufacturers do not understand this simple fact is beyond me. Wide angle, more than a 90 degree field of view is a necessity for underwater use for anything but macro crap.

N
Thanks Nemrod. I've been reading other sites about this stuff. I just noticed that strobe distances halve underwater, i.e. if you have a strobe good for 50' on land, it will tend to be good for 25' underwater. Also, what I would consider a wide angle lens is 'normal' underwater, e.g. 28mm underwater is a kit lens where as 50mm on land is a kit lens. I guess a 625mm lens would be narrow focus plus the wouldn't be enough light either.

Macro crap, :smilie39:. I knew that would stir you guys.:smiley2:

Nonetheless, Snell's Law, read about it. The flat port causes a multiplication factor of 1.33X. A lens on a typical camera at the "wide end" is usually about 35MM equivalent focal length. Multiply that by 1.33 and you get your effective underwater focal length. Now, some cameras, I think the new G10 and Nikon P6000 for an example, have a wide end at 28MM so multiply that by 1.33 and get and effective underwater focal length equal to a 35 MM lens on the surface--understand??

A dome port or other type of corrected lens restores the original focal length when shooting underwater or nearly so--there are several variable that affect this but in any case that is the concept and thus why you see wide angle shooters using dome ports with SLR cameras and P&S cameras using corrected wet mount wide angle lenses. In some cases these wet mount lenses may also incorporate an optional dome port to the assembly.

A dome port and wide angle lens will allow focus from the dome surface to infinity so you can actually put the dome right on a tiny little shrimp and yet it will be in focus as might the wreck in the background which allows some interesting shooting possibilities beyond the typical higher magnification "macro" crap---:smiley36:.

The Inon 165MM focal length macro lens is about 2.5X (I think). A 35MM lens underwater through a flat port is approximately 1.0X. A Inon 100wal (the 100 is not focal length in this case but FOV, field of view in degrees) is about 0.56X and a dome port wet mount lens like the Inon 100wal with dome port or the Inon 165AD FE (semi fisheye) is about 0.40X to about 0.46X depending upon the actual camera, port geometry etc. (corrected equivalents to focal length of 35MM format shot in air)

I love the wet mount concept because I can go from macro (Inon AD165MM macro lens to standard lens and port to wide angle ( Inon AD105WAL or Inon/Ikelite/Epoque 100 WAL) and then with a twist of the bayonet mount go ultra wide ( install the Inon 165AD semi fisheye lens).

Now that is versatility and that camera you guys are talking about cannot do any of that due to the physical limitations of it's exceeding long zoom ratio lens. You are really limited to standard head and shoulder snaps through the flat port and macro.

N

scubadiver888
02-08-2009, 09:57
Anything with more than a 4X zoom is problematic for an underwater camera unless macro is your only interest.

N
Problematic how? Is it that the larger zoom suffers from camera shake?


The long zoom ratio lens requires a long port. Long ports make mounting wet mount external wide angle lenses difficult because they need to be close to the camera native lens. The long port sits the wet mount lens out so far that severe vignetting makes it essentially unworkable. "Zoom" lenses are fine for terrestrial use, underwater you need a short focal length lens and to work with a wet mount lens it needs to be very close to the housing port.

Why camera and housing manufacturers do not understand this simple fact is beyond me. Wide angle, more than a 90 degree field of view is a necessity for underwater use for anything but macro crap.

N
Thanks Nemrod. I've been reading other sites about this stuff. I just noticed that strobe distances halve underwater, i.e. if you have a strobe good for 50' on land, it will tend to be good for 25' underwater. Also, what I would consider a wide angle lens is 'normal' underwater, e.g. 28mm underwater is a kit lens where as 50mm on land is a kit lens. I guess a 625mm lens would be narrow focus plus the wouldn't be enough light either.

Macro crap, :smilie39:. I knew that would stir you guys.:smiley2:

Nonetheless, Snell's Law, read about it. The flat port causes a multiplication factor of 1.33X. A lens on a typical camera at the "wide end" is usually about 35MM equivalent focal length. Multiply that by 1.33 and you get your effective underwater focal length. Now, some cameras, I think the new G10 and Nikon P6000 for an example, have a wide end at 28MM so multiply that by 1.33 and get and effective underwater focal length equal to a 35 MM lens on the surface--understand??

A dome port or other type of corrected lens restores the original focal length when shooting underwater or nearly so--there are several variable that affect this but in any case that is the concept and thus why you see wide angle shooters using dome ports with SLR cameras and P&S cameras using corrected wet mount wide angle lenses. In some cases these wet mount lenses may also incorporate an optional dome port to the assembly.

A dome port and wide angle lens will allow focus from the dome surface to infinity so you can actually put the dome right on a tiny little shrimp and yet it will be in focus as might the wreck in the background which allows some interesting shooting possibilities beyond the typical higher magnification "macro" crap---:smiley36:.

The Inon 165MM focal length macro lens is about 2.5X (I think). A 35MM lens underwater through a flat port is approximately 1.0X. A Inon 100wal (the 100 is not focal length in this case but FOV, field of view in degrees) is about 0.56X and a dome port wet mount lens like the Inon 100wal with dome port or the Inon 165AD FE (semi fisheye) is about 0.40X to about 0.46X depending upon the actual camera, port geometry etc. (corrected equivalents to focal length of 35MM format shot in air)

I love the wet mount concept because I can go from macro (Inon AD165MM macro lens to standard lens and port to wide angle ( Inon AD105WAL or Inon/Ikelite/Epoque 100 WAL) and then with a twist of the bayonet mount go ultra wide ( install the Inon 165AD semi fisheye lens).

Now that is versatility and that camera you guys are talking about cannot do any of that due to the physical limitations of it's exceeding long zoom ratio lens. You are really limited to standard head and shoulder snaps through the flat port and macro.

N
Holy macro crap, batman. I'm learning a lot here. Mostly I'm learning I don't know anything about underwater photography. Not too surprising however. Until I got my buoyancy dialed in I avoiding sticking a camera in my hand or even thinking about these things.