PDA

View Full Version : Pony bottle location/size



deepdiver47
08-21-2007, 11:15
I am thinking about getting "spare air". I have been to the website and downloaded the manual. They list several different methods to attach the bottle assembly. I would think that the front bottom edge of your BCD would be best.

I am wondering where are most of you attaching it to?

Also, which size are most of you guys using and why?

Thanks, Deep

fire diver
08-21-2007, 11:28
My personal opinion here...

STAY AWAY FROM SPARE AIR!

It's way undersized for anything but snorkeling, and way too expensive.

since this is in the solo diver forum, I would assume you want this for a redundant air supply, correct?

First, you need to know what your SAC (Surface Air Cunsumption) rate is. Once you know that, you can decide how deep you plan on using this bottle. Next figure out how many CF of gas you need to get you safely back to the surface with a safety stop.

Once you understand the volume you need, you'll understand why the price is so bad. I recommend a 19 or 30 CF pony, with a basic regulator and SPG (button or standard). All that will cost less than a 6cf spare air.

FD

No Misses
08-21-2007, 12:02
I agree with Fire Diver. I use a 19cf pony attached to the left side of my AL 80 w/ Quickdraw II bracket. The pony is inverted, so that I can reach the knob easily. second stage is bungied to the pony. When I want to use it, I pull the 2nd stage free. Then I turn on the gas. By diving with the gas off, I know that the bottle will be full when needed (no slow leak draining the bottle).
P.S. before hitting the water, I turn on the gas to verify it is full and to pressurize the hose. This helps eliminate water intrusion into the second stage. After verification I turn it off until needed. I hope this helps with your decision :-)

CompuDude
08-21-2007, 12:19
Fire Diver is dead on. If the type of diving you are doing dictates that you carry a pony (which is a different discussion), a spare air is useless for anything deeper than 25'... and even then it will barely get you to the surface. At depth, a spare air lasts only a few breaths. If you want to make it to the surface with one, be prepared for a DCS hit when you get there due to an unsafe rate of ascension.

Get a 19 (min.) or 30 cf (better) pony and sling it. Only that will give you enough air to make a safe ascent, complete with safety stop.

diverdown
08-21-2007, 12:30
I agree w/ compudog. I found that slinging it is by far the best method "for me". I hope you take the time and figure out whats best for your style of diving. Theres alot of good info out there to help you decide.
I know theres countless "opinions" on scubaboard.com. Good luck and always keep your bubbles going up.

somewhereinla
08-21-2007, 12:37
The reason I don't like spare air is that I have seen one free flow like crazy and it made me wonder about the quality... In theory, an experienced diver should be able to ascend from 100ft with one breath of air which would make spare air plenty. I should also say I know a very experienced diver that use it and is happy with it. I personally would either get 1 6cf or 13cf (not much bigger than the 6cf) tank with a small reg. it would cost you about the same as spare air. Also check out the H2O Odyssey Extra Air System.

rainmaker
08-21-2007, 17:44
I use a 30 cf pony, and attach it to the right side of my BC.

GONEHAWKN
08-22-2007, 18:23
yep, 30cf for me too. i sling it on my right.

jeraldjcook
08-22-2007, 18:28
I have a 19cf, and if you travel, it's about as large as you can fit in a carry-on. 13cf is a nice size too, a bit small. 30cf, a tad large IMHO but if you only do local diving, why not.

(I know, I could put it in my checked luggage but I'm afraid some idiot TSA guy who doesn't know the rules will take it.)

jeraldjcook
08-22-2007, 18:29
Oops, I sling it on my right. Just sold my quick draw bracket as it was a pain, especially on cattle boats when I want it the most.

crosseyed95
08-22-2007, 21:18
Get a 19 (min.) or 30 cf (better) pony and sling it. Only that will give you enough air to make a safe ascent, complete with safety stop.

I agree... I mentioned on a different thread that I have a 30 cf and have actually used it in an emergency. Because I had it slung in front, I passed it off to the wife and we made a safe ascent complete with a safety stop. I swear by my 30 and won't dive without it...

cummings66
08-23-2007, 16:42
I use a 40 cf myself, it's serving double duty depending on the dive. When I solo it's my backup, other times it's a stage. It works for both.

willardj
08-23-2007, 19:52
I recommend a 30 or 40 CF pony, with a basic regulator and SPG. Sling it under the arm like a stage. This seams to be the best way and easy to control from snags

RECDiver
08-23-2007, 23:36
I use a 40cf and attach it to the right side of my backplate or Transpac. And as others have already said, stay away from Spare Air.

porsche060
08-24-2007, 16:09
Aren't pony bottles very expensive? Of course your life....

fire diver
08-24-2007, 17:14
Aren't pony bottles very expensive? Of course your life....

Expensive compared to a spare air? No. An AL30 will run about $120. Put a cheap, reliable reg (like a sherwood) on it for a couple hundred. Even less if want to buy used. If you buy a used reg, just be sure to get it serviced before using it.

FD

cummings66
08-24-2007, 18:20
In the end I use my older Genesis Reg on my tank, it's not a high performance regulator, in fact it's an octo which is fine for the tank. Since I already had it, in the end it is cheaper to use the AL tank. Even if you didn't with the ST's discount and 250 postings deal you could buy a tank and reg cheaper than normal retail on the spare air.

meesier42
09-04-2007, 08:31
lets see Spare Air 3.0 claim 57 breaths at the surface, so at depth of 33ft that is down to 28 assuming that you can breath it down to 0psi, with overbottom that basically means 20 breaths or so. I wouldn't count on that. If you think about a 19cf, that is 1/4 of your primary tank (assuming AL80) that is a lot of air and should be close to 20 minutes of air at 30 ft, vice 20 breaths. Now my train of thaught really only applies to recreational diving.

BSea
09-04-2007, 08:34
I have a 19 that I sling. If I had to do it over, I'd get a 40. I use an old aqua lung conshelf reg. It's reliable, and 1 I used for years before upgrading.

tonka97
09-04-2007, 08:40
I have a 30 cf pony, and it came in HANDY one time at 85 feet. I will always love it!

I find that rigging the pony onto my 80 AL cylinder to be a pain, as it upsets my trim, and plan to convert to sling.

The Spare Air device is probably the #1 investment divers regret making. If you need redundancy, get serious.

:smiley33:

fire diver
09-04-2007, 08:46
My tech instructor showed me an interesting way of slinging a pony this weekend. He said it needs to be a 19 or smaller for it to work (depending on the person). What he does is to "butt sling" it. He clips it off behind him, under his BC. The reason he gave is, more streamlined, anything his shoulder can fit through, so will this rig, not in the way under his arm, no bouyancy issues.

He runs the reg up his right side, and can very easily reach down to turn the valve on/off as needed.

I have to say it's interesting. I'm used to everything in one tight package clipped off my left side. I may have to try this configuration out on a few dives to see what I think.

FD

Tod
09-19-2007, 01:34
Just to chime in, I use a 19 cf pony with a Quick Draw. I mount it on my right side, however, and use it much like an octo (with the reg on a bungie tied off around my neck).

nathanbarlow
09-28-2007, 06:40
In theory, an experienced diver should be able to ascend from 100ft with one breath of air which would make spare air plenty.

Am i right in thinking 100ft is around 30m? If so, using a spare air sounds a bit foolhardy as, like many have said, it would barely be enough to get to the surface without getting a serious DCS hit.

Plus how many people can do 30m in a pool on one breath, no hyperventilation beforehand? I know I cant without a low heart rate and plenty of deep breathing beforehand, and I'm a very fit 19 year old - the average diver is likely to be in their 30's or older . . Factor in that you would be stressed from having a primary air failure, this would also mean you cant use your BC to ascend - forcing you to have to ditch your lead and swim it. Also likely to have just been finning or doing fairly strenuous exercise prior to air failure. Finally - having to breathe out on ascent to avoid a lung popping.
Thus I'm willing to bet the majority of people would not make it up from 30m on one breath of air, and if they did they would be in a pretty bad way from DCS/lung damage/ear damage.

just something to consider.

padi1029
09-30-2007, 17:26
I agree with the previous posts..forget the Spare Air. For just about the same cost you can get a 6cu ft tank and reg setup. I have this setup and won't travel without it. For local (Jersey) and deeper diving I have a 19cu ft and use same reg. When I travel I take the 6cu ft and at first people looked at me like I was nutty...until another diver needed it and their buddy was too busy watching a turtle to notice. 80 ft below in Jersey is same as 80 ft below in carribean...I don't know why people feel safer or become complacient in warm water and high vis. IMO buddy system is flawed and the sooner PADI and other certification agencies realize this and put emphasis on self reliance and self rescue the safer we will all be.

OK...off my soap box.

Nnow I have a questions relating to some of the posts I read above. I tried attaching my pony to my BC along bottom edge and under right arm..did not care for it. So I am stuck with it attached to tank. What do some of you mean when you say you "sling" it on one side or another. What is this sling...maybe it is what I am looking for?

Thanks.

itbefun
09-30-2007, 23:10
All very valid comments. I dive with a 40cf because of the depth of the wrecks that I dive on. To respond to the previous post, my tank is 'slung' by having two dog clips one attached to an upper D ring the other to my side D ring so the tank hangs under my left arm. While diving it's barely noticable. Another advantage is if a buddy needs air, you give him your sling then there is no air sharing, much safer.

itbefun

CompuDude
10-01-2007, 14:06
Nnow I have a questions relating to some of the posts I read above. I tried attaching my pony to my BC along bottom edge and under right arm..did not care for it. So I am stuck with it attached to tank. What do some of you mean when you say you "sling" it on one side or another. What is this sling...maybe it is what I am looking for?
No sling. "Slung".

Bolt snaps, one attached to a D-ring on the left shoulder strap, one attached to a D-ring on the left wait strap.

Once you are properly trimmed out in a horizontal position, you barely notice it there.

http://www.gue.com/Equipment/Config/rhea-cayman_stage219.jpg

Defman
10-01-2007, 16:08
Let me expand this question a little bit...

I'm a "semi-solo" diver. By that I mean that I go on trips alone and don't usually have a "buddy" on a dive. While I may with a group of people, I'm usually kinda doing my own thing...

What about a 6cf tank to have in the event I do run out of air, or more likely have a failure, and need a little to get caught up to the group to borrow someone else's (likely the DM)?

ianr33
10-01-2007, 16:22
Nnow I have a questions relating to some of the posts I read above. I tried attaching my pony to my BC along bottom edge and under right arm..did not care for it. So I am stuck with it attached to tank. What do some of you mean when you say you "sling" it on one side or another. What is this sling...maybe it is what I am looking for?
No sling. "Slung".

Bolt snaps, one attached to a D-ring on the left shoulder strap, one attached to a D-ring on the left wait strap.

Once you are properly trimmed out in a horizontal position, you barely notice it there.

http://www.gue.com/Equipment/Config/rhea-cayman_stage219.jpg

That diver looks perfect does he not. Almost as if he was posing for the camera. Shame about the leak coming off his first stage!

RonFrank
10-01-2007, 16:37
I dive a 19CF pony. I use the Zeagle straps and attach it to my tank on the right.

IMO Spare air is a bad idea in that it will NOT get most divers to the surface with a safe ascent. If you want to carry air, get at LEAST a 13CF pony. Anything smaller is almost pointless.

There was a recent discussion on Pony Tanks on THIS board. It provided SAC rates, ascent rates, and discussion on what it takes to get a diver to the surface safely in the case of an OOA issue.

fire diver
10-01-2007, 16:38
Ok, off subject, but...

After studying that pic, Iam a little perplexed. At first I thought maybe it was a Sherwood reg (they are design to "leak" like that), but they look like SP regs. But looking at the 1st stage.... What am I seeing? It look like a single tank setup, but it looks like the end-cap of the first stage is pointing to the camera. The hose connections look off too. H valve? Anyone know?

FD

CompuDude
10-02-2007, 04:00
Let me expand this question a little bit...

I'm a "semi-solo" diver. By that I mean that I go on trips alone and don't usually have a "buddy" on a dive. While I may with a group of people, I'm usually kinda doing my own thing...

What about a 6cf tank to have in the event I do run out of air, or more likely have a failure, and need a little to get caught up to the group to borrow someone else's (likely the DM)?

Why not do the numbers. (I'm not an American so I'll work in metric, you can do the conversions).

I would convert it, but I've already run these numbers (in imperial):

http://forum.scubatoys.com/showpost.php?p=51240&postcount=17

:smiley2:

rfb3
01-14-2008, 13:13
I have a SpareAir and have used it once, and it worked. No DCS. But, if I upgrade, are you guys finding it hard to get it thru the check point at the airport? I always carry mine on in fear of someone taking it out of my bag. I assume when flying with it, you must disassemble and re-assemble after you arrive? No worries with moisture in the tank, etc.???

BouzoukiJoe A.K.A. wrecker130 AKA Chuck Norris AKA joeforbroke (banned)
01-14-2008, 14:41
You used spare air and didn't get DCS. OK. I don't think anyone claims that using spare air causes DCS.

However, rapid ascents are undeniably linked to DCS and AGE. And spare air is linked to rapid ascents.

For some environments spare air may be just fine, however I believe that in any environment in which a buddy's octo is not sufficient backup then neither is spare air.

If you dive deep or dive wrecks or in environments where entanglement is a serious possibility the extra air in a pony versus spare air is a life saver. If I get entangled, knowing that I have a 40cf pony let's me breath easier and calmly work to extricate myself.

Even if a rapid ascent is possible, is it wise? Besides DCS, a rapid ascent increases your chance of being lost at sea since you don't get to pick where you come to the surface.

For my type of diving, you can go ahead and use a spare air. Me personally, I'll try to find the anchor line and make a normal slow ascent and not omit any safety/deco stops. Meanwhile, you'll likely be drifting in the current, possibly bent, waiting for the boat to come get you after everyone else is on board. If there is current or high seas, I hope you have your surface signal kit.

Crimediver
01-14-2008, 18:40
I bought a 1.7 cf Spare Air. What a waste of money. I use it nowadays clipped to my kayak in case I get pinned undewater in rapids or a strainer. Might help in a bind, maybe...

sparky
01-22-2008, 22:38
I have a 19 cu.ft. pony that I back mount. Most of my buddies sling their pony bottles so they can hand it off if they need to. I carry my pony for my own use, so I don't feel the need to be able to hand it off.

rfb3
02-01-2008, 14:49
Ok, off subject, but...

After studying that pic, Iam a little perplexed. At first I thought maybe it was a Sherwood reg (they are design to "leak" like that), but they look like SP regs. But looking at the 1st stage.... What am I seeing? It look like a single tank setup, but it looks like the end-cap of the first stage is pointing to the camera. The hose connections look off too. H valve? Anyone know?

FD


In reading about the pony bottle setups, and whether or not to leave the valve on, I keep seeing the Sherwood regs are supposed to leak a little. Is this true? And if so, why? What would be the purpose of a leak?

WAHMof2
02-01-2008, 16:47
I was questioning that too. Why would any reg be designed to leak, even a little tiny bit?

fire diver
02-06-2008, 10:46
Ok, off subject, but...

After studying that pic, Iam a little perplexed. At first I thought maybe it was a Sherwood reg (they are design to "leak" like that), but they look like SP regs. But looking at the 1st stage.... What am I seeing? It look like a single tank setup, but it looks like the end-cap of the first stage is pointing to the camera. The hose connections look off too. H valve? Anyone know?

FD


In reading about the pony bottle setups, and whether or not to leave the valve on, I keep seeing the Sherwood regs are supposed to leak a little. Is this true? And if so, why? What would be the purpose of a leak?


The reg is designed that way on purpose. Sherwoods use a specially designed "port" (not really, you can't put something else in there, but that's how it appears) on the reg body. This "port" accomplishes the act of adjusting the reg pressure to accomodate the change in depth during a dive. It's not a typical "wet" system where water directly contacts the compensating components. The deeper you go, the more pressure is exerted on the air bleed, thereby causing a corrosponding rise in internal pressure and adjusting the ambient pressure of the reg.

I didn't get much sleep last night, so if this is confusing, let me know and I'll try to word it differently.

As a PS, Sherwood regs are considered 'workhorses'. They can take a lot of abuse, and are very easy to maintain and repair. LOTS of shops use them for thier rental fleet.

rfb3
02-06-2008, 13:18
Ok, off subject, but...

After studying that pic, Iam a little perplexed. At first I thought maybe it was a Sherwood reg (they are design to "leak" like that), but they look like SP regs. But looking at the 1st stage.... What am I seeing? It look like a single tank setup, but it looks like the end-cap of the first stage is pointing to the camera. The hose connections look off too. H valve? Anyone know?

FD


In reading about the pony bottle setups, and whether or not to leave the valve on, I keep seeing the Sherwood regs are supposed to leak a little. Is this true? And if so, why? What would be the purpose of a leak?


The reg is designed that way on purpose. Sherwoods use a specially designed "port" (not really, you can't put something else in there, but that's how it appears) on the reg body. This "port" accomplishes the act of adjusting the reg pressure to accomodate the change in depth during a dive. It's not a typical "wet" system where water directly contacts the compensating components. The deeper you go, the more pressure is exerted on the air bleed, thereby causing a corrosponding rise in internal pressure and adjusting the ambient pressure of the reg.

I didn't get much sleep last night, so if this is confusing, let me know and I'll try to word it differently.

As a PS, Sherwood regs are considered 'workhorses'. They can take a lot of abuse, and are very easy to maintain and repair. LOTS of shops use them for thier rental fleet.


I see. Thanks for the explanation!
I know from my divemaster class a few years ago, a small leak doesn't really allow that much air to leave the tank. Our intructor cut the HP hose to the guage as a demo, and we swam around. We noticed at the end of the dive our additional consumption due to the leak was very negligible.

CompuDude
02-06-2008, 13:28
I see. Thanks for the explanation!
I know from my divemaster class a few years ago, a small leak doesn't really allow that much air to leave the tank. Our intructor cut the HP hose to the guage as a demo, and we swam around. We noticed at the end of the dive our additional consumption due to the leak was very negligible.

Yeesh. Sounds like an expensive way to make a small point!

rfb3
02-06-2008, 13:30
I see. Thanks for the explanation!
I know from my divemaster class a few years ago, a small leak doesn't really allow that much air to leave the tank. Our intructor cut the HP hose to the guage as a demo, and we swam around. We noticed at the end of the dive our additional consumption due to the leak was very negligible.

Yeesh. Sounds like an expensive way to make a small point!

Cash is not a concern when it come to a good education! :)

BSea
02-06-2008, 13:56
I see. Thanks for the explanation!
I know from my divemaster class a few years ago, a small leak doesn't really allow that much air to leave the tank. Our intructor cut the HP hose to the guage as a demo, and we swam around. We noticed at the end of the dive our additional consumption due to the leak was very negligible.

Yeesh. Sounds like an expensive way to make a small point!

Cash is not a concern when it come to a good education! :)
You could show the same thing just by loosening the hose. Just a thought.

MSilvia
02-06-2008, 14:03
I bought a 1.7 cf Spare Air. I use it nowadays clipped to my kayak in case I get pinned undewater in rapids or a strainer.
That's exactly the sort of thing it's good for.

DiverJoe
03-05-2008, 19:06
I agree with the first few posts on here. Skip the spare air (not enough air to get you safely "home") and compute the space and air requirements. I add space because of low clearance diving.

I personally run a 19cf on a detachable rig with a Oceanic GT3 reg. I can detach it and "hand it off" if need be, otherwise it is small, out of the way and a great saftey margin, down side is another reg set, press gauge and bottle to service/hydo.

Safe Diving all!
DiverJoe

itsmescotty
03-06-2008, 00:03
Spare air. . . Just something to get you into trouble.
Here's my story.
I was a USNavy diver and part of our course required a free ascent from 100' - no biggie. The only traumatic part was climbing down the stairs afterward. They flooded the 'chamber' to just above the door, equalized and we went out blowing bubbles all the way to the surface. No bubbles and one of the instructors stationed every so often on the ascent would grab you - I never saw anyone grabbed.
So anyway, years later while I was diving commercially in the Philippine Islands off of Puerto Princesa, Pawalan we had an occasion to do some sport scuba instead of surface supplied. I got carried away collecting coral and shells, each being neater and deeper than the last. I spotted a black coral tree and decided I had to have it - sigh. I was just under a thermal layer, I could put my hand above my head and feel the warmer water, that was neat. So anyway I'm chipping away at the coral and feel the onset of narcosis (I'd been narked once before coming off a mixed gas dive and had thought they screwed up on my mix and I was going to die. When I realized it was narcosis and kicked back to enjoy it the moment was gone sigh again). so back to the coral. . . As I was chipping away it started getting difficult to breathe. I tripped the reserve and found it had already been tripped. I should have mentioned that my bottle was inverted because we used them as bailouts when we are surface supplied. So, I took my last breath, pulled on the coral and started for the surface 210' up. Oh yeah, forgot to mention that too. Remember I said each piece of coral was just a little deeper than the last then there was nothing until I saw the black coral. On the way up I popped the BC but it was too deep to inflate, I made it to the surface on that one breath and still had my coral.
Any castigations anyone has about this, I've made to myself. I never worried about an embolism and we had a chamber if anything developed but nothing ever did. I was never narked again and have never been bent.
Later on in in Indonesia I was on a jobsite and bored so practiced free diving and made it to the 112' bottom where I would shoot a fish or two and come back up.

DarinMartell
03-06-2008, 00:31
If you already have the Spare Air and have "seen the light" don't be too worried. It has it's place with a-lot of divers that sty shallow and can be sold on E-Bay. I bought mine last year for $190 new and sold it on E-bay (bought a 30cf from ST) last month for $183.

WaScubaDude
03-06-2008, 01:36
I am thinking about getting "spare air". I have been to the website and downloaded the manual. They list several different methods to attach the bottle assembly. I would think that the front bottom edge of your BCD would be best.
snip...

Saddle it and ride that pony!

Hollywood703
03-15-2008, 11:42
I am currently using (selling) a 30cf that I had mounted(maybe slung would be better?), however, i found that it made me feel unbalnaced when out of water. I havent used it, other than once in a great while i will drain my main tank and when setting dock legs in 10 feet of water or so, i will use the pony. I think im going to downgrade to a 19cf tank, or considering just going to doubles.

Daved
03-30-2008, 13:40
Just returned from Bonaire--well a month ago-and used my new quick draw bracket---man is that easy. 13cf back mount inverted with 5 foot hose to a clip on bcd. Air turned on\system pressurized at surface--then turned off.
Ease of use is important to lazy guy like me. Quick draw bracket makes it easy.

cummings66
03-30-2008, 18:14
Hollywood, ponies that big aren't normally carried attached while you walk. Carry it in by hand and attach while in the water, much easier and SAFER.

Grin
03-31-2008, 08:39
My 13 stays on the tank straps all day, even when changing tanks. And I cannot even tell it's there, in or out of the water. A 19 would be about the same. For open water diving, I can't see why anyone would want to sling a 19(or smaller) pony when they could have it strapped to the main tank and be compeltely free of it.
Deep diving or cave diving I can understand slinging. Open water normal diving, I can't see it.

Splitlip
05-11-2008, 07:57
Grin, is the valve "on" while you dive? Valve up or down?

The advantage I see to slinging is the valve can be off and easily accessed when needed.

Hunters and photogs I know who use a pony won't sling them.

Grin
05-11-2008, 09:23
My valve is up and on. I had it upsidedown for awhile, but I flipped it back up. My buddies mount theirs upsidedown with the valve off. Too each their own! I use a crossfiller settup to top mine off every couple trips. I put about 3300 in it and when it gets down to 2900-3000 I fill it back up. I leave it on all day, checking between dives to make sure noone decided to do me a favor and turn it off for whatever reason. I just like the idea of it being there as ready as possible, all the time. I guess others feel it will possibly, somehow, drain itself when they are not expecting it. I use my pony every dive, no matter what, and it has never been found drained down once, since I have had it. That's about 3 years and 100s of dives. My buddies routinly leave their pony on the deck and use them more for extended gas supply. Mine is never used for extended gas supply, and is there for one reason: The day I suck on my reg and nothing happens! I also don't dive a backup reg on my primary octo, so I feel the pony octo should be avilable, and on, in case I loose my primary reg while digging under a ledge, or whatever situation may present itself.
My theory is make it convenient enough that you don't question taking it(strap it to your back), make it as available as possible(valve on), and rig it every dive no matter what (it's a bail out bottle and you can't predict when you'll need it or for what reason). Also give the pony settup the attention it deserves. Meaning double checking the valve is on before every dive. The reason I flipped the bottle back upright is: It makes checking the valve on/off too easy, as it's right beside the primary tanks valve, and I can see the little button pressure gauge reading very easily also. I have rigged my pony for my personal preference and tryed it this way and that, and ended up this way. It is the easy to verify, don't have to think about it way. It's always there, It's always on, it's always verified, and I can't tell it's there on my back at all. I see no down points or possible faults.
Others will have to decide their settup. It depends on what proceedure you choose to(or honetly really will) follow. A pony is only as good as the proceedures you follow and implement. Those requirments will vary, person to person, as to what is the best settup for each person.
I see the point of slinging, if tech diving. But I; single tank, open water, no deco, dive all the time. So I see absolutly no point in not doing it my way. I don't even know it's there.

Splitlip
05-11-2008, 09:56
Thanks.
Do you wear the pony 2nd stage on a necklace then?

Grin
05-12-2008, 08:56
No, I clip it to my chest D ring. One of my buddies uses the necklace.
Mine is mounted valve up. The reg hose is routed straight down, and goes under my right arm and clips to my right chest D ring. It's out of the way this way, and the hose has plenty of slack when routed over my right arm for use. When the bottle was upsidedown the hose was borderline to short (another reason I flipped it back upright).