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View Full Version : Hello, My name is Larry, I am an Air Pig...



lrk1960
08-21-2007, 19:58
Now that I have my confession out of the way we can get down to business.

I seem to be the first one who runs out of air and have to return topside. Okay so not exactly run out but get low enough that I have to ascend for my safety stop and get out at 500psi.

I made 6 dives this past week in the Caymans. It was truly beautiful and I would have liked to stay under to my time limit and not be restricted by air.

I seem to breath deep. I find that if I reduce my breath size after a few breaths I am really feeling air starved and there go a few rapid deep breaths reducing any gains.

I'm looking for suggestions on how I can improve my dive times. Please let me know what works for you.

mwhities
08-21-2007, 20:01
Best thing to do is to dive and dive and dive and dive and dive and ..well, you get the point. :)

Michael

NitroWill
08-21-2007, 20:03
Just keep diving, spend as much itme underwater as you can..The more comfortable you get underwater the more relaxed you are and that leads to a lower air consumption rate..Just try and relax as much as you can and keep diving!

dmdoss
08-21-2007, 20:04
Maybe try a bigger tank... Are you in good shape? Do you smoke? Do you have good Buoyancy control?

Jaymeany
08-21-2007, 20:07
make sure your weight is right on. also fitness level has an affect on air consumption. Basically, more info is needed there are a lot of ways to eat up air.

Vercingetorix
08-21-2007, 20:10
Hello, my name is Rick, and I suck air like it's free.

I'm relaxed and comfortable. I don't smoke. I'm in good shape. I, too, have heard "just kep diving and your SAC rate will drop." I don't see how. I just breathe deeply. I breathe between 6 to10 breaths per minute.. I usually breathe out all the way. My inhale cycle is short; my exhale cycle is long. My buoyancy control is spot on. I properly weighted (in fact, with my BP/W, I wear NO weight belt).

I, too, would like to discover the Zen of a low SAC rate.

deepdiver47
08-21-2007, 21:01
Larry,

Take a look at the attached.

137

ertechsg
08-21-2007, 21:17
Stay shallower uses less air. Ride above everyone else. Most of all relax check it all out

cgvmer
08-21-2007, 21:27
I rent larger tanks....and have just started losing weight......

ScubaToys Larry
08-21-2007, 21:29
One of the biggest reasons I've seen divers use up more air is a lousy attitude!

Now I don't mean that you're always pissed off... attitude for an air plane is what is it's orientation in the air.

Many new divers are actually going through the water like this / instead of like this __

See if you dive with your feet lower than your head, at which case you are plowing through the water which really adds a bunch of resistance and creates a lot more work.

Ask your buddy... look at pictures and video.

Another thing to do is touch your chin to your chest and look under your feet. If you only see the bottom of the ocean floor - your head is too high and your feet are too low. You should see the water behind you.

As instructors, we do that all the time to check on the folks behind us - look under us, not twist around to look. And if you are positioned right in the water, you can do this. It might take moving weights around a bit, learning to relax, and getting your buoyancy tuned in - but that is one of the biggest reasons I've seen.

And what divers do is fight that slight upward angle and kick constantly. Every now and then just stop kicking. Do you drop? If so, you were using energy instead of buoyancy to stay at a given depth.

Without diving with you, we can only guess... but there have been some great suggestions here - try them all and keep working on it!

Just realizing you need to work on it shows you are being a good and aware diver. Keep up the good work!

Black-Gorrilla
08-21-2007, 21:35
breath trough a straw, not a pool hose (instructor said this..) after i was told that... my air consumption was great...
and i always seem to do ok on the first dive of the day, and GREAT on the second for some odd reason...

dmdoss
08-21-2007, 21:38
One of the biggest reasons I've seen divers use up more air is a lousy attitude!

Now I don't mean that you're always pissed off... attitude for an air plane is what is it's orientation in the air.

Many new divers are actually going through the water like this / instead of like this __

See if you dive with your feet lower than your head, at which case you are plowing through the water which really adds a bunch of resistance and creates a lot more work.

Ask your buddy... look at pictures and video.

Another thing to do is touch your chin to your chest and look under your feet. If you only see the bottom of the ocean floor - your head is too high and your feet are too low. You should see the water behind you.

As instructors, we do that all the time to check on the folks behind us - look under us, not twist around to look. And if you are positioned right in the water, you can do this. It might take moving weights around a bit, learning to relax, and getting your buoyancy tuned in - but that is one of the biggest reasons I've seen.

And what divers do is fight that slight upward angle and kick constantly. Every now and then just stop kicking. Do you drop? If so, you were using energy instead of buoyancy to stay at a given depth.

Without diving with you, we can only guess... but there have been some great suggestions here - try them all and keep working on it!

Just realizing you need to work on it shows you are being a good and aware diver. Keep up the good work!


What Larry is talking about here is also why I switched to a back inflate bc from a jacket. Seemed to me it was easier to plane out.

deepdiver47
08-22-2007, 07:37
Agreed Larry, / = tail dragging. I think that you are trying to sell them more Bridages :)

3rdEye
08-24-2007, 01:33
One of the biggest reasons I've seen divers use up more air is a lousy attitude!

Now I don't mean that you're always pissed off... attitude for an air plane is what is it's orientation in the air.

Many new divers are actually going through the water like this / instead of like this __

See if you dive with your feet lower than your head, at which case you are plowing through the water which really adds a bunch of resistance and creates a lot more work.

Ask your buddy... look at pictures and video.

Another thing to do is touch your chin to your chest and look under your feet. If you only see the bottom of the ocean floor - your head is too high and your feet are too low. You should see the water behind you.

As instructors, we do that all the time to check on the folks behind us - look under us, not twist around to look. And if you are positioned right in the water, you can do this. It might take moving weights around a bit, learning to relax, and getting your buoyancy tuned in - but that is one of the biggest reasons I've seen.

And what divers do is fight that slight upward angle and kick constantly. Every now and then just stop kicking. Do you drop? If so, you were using energy instead of buoyancy to stay at a given depth.

Without diving with you, we can only guess... but there have been some great suggestions here - try them all and keep working on it!

Just realizing you need to work on it shows you are being a good and aware diver. Keep up the good work!

i'm only a newb, but i have to agree....paying a lot of attention to this stuff, especially buoyancy and not finning to stay at a given depth probably added 10-15 mins to my last few dives. I just try to relax and be very deliberately slow about moving around.

CharlieSierra
08-24-2007, 02:47
Thanks, Larry. I was given the dive, dive, dive answer the last few times as well. Ironically, I quit smoking, got in better shape, and fully concentrated on controlled breathing. My last dives all lasted 30 minutes max at around 45-60' and after my safety stop, I was showing 2-300 psi. I've got some pics I'll have to look at to see if I was plowing through the water. I've always had a problem with getting that great superman pose. I can never get my upper half heavier than my lower half. I need an integrated bc with a pocket in my neckline, I think. Great tip - thanks, again!

Buoyant1
08-24-2007, 06:57
Looking at your profile quick, I see 0-24 dives...it WILL get better! I only have 40 some odd dives, and I can see it getting better...it also comes to slowing down and getting a nice steady pace.

I did a dive in Key Largo, (like dive #10-15) and spent a lot of time taking pictures with my new camera, and I was able to get 45-50 minutes out of an al80, and I wasn't down to 500psi when I surfaced! THAT was a new world record for me after my last dive which was probably about 30 minutes plus.

For local diving I'm using a 119, and I've never sucked that below 1000 psi (except for a marathon dive covering a lot of ground, and that was to 900) The one thing that changed is I don't stress over sucking down the tank anymore...and the thoughts of that just goes away!

Keep diving, don't stesss over it..it will get better!

cummings66
08-24-2007, 07:24
Take a look at the attached.

Larry, don't do what that says. You're a pretty new diver according to your profile and what that pdf suggests, holding your breath with a full inhalation while keeping your airway open is an advanced technique. If you screw it up you will have serious problems. This is not something I would suggest any new diver try, way to easy to do something dangerous with.

Do what the others have said and just get comfortable and get your trim right. I've noticed for myself that if I'm out of trim I can measure an increase in my RMV.

Flatliner
08-24-2007, 07:47
I hate to state the obvious but unless I missed it there is also the little matter of tidal volume (air volume in/out per breath). I am 6'4" and my son is 4'10"ish. Simple math says that no matter how good or how often I dive I will NEVER use less air than he does. I saw that during his OW dives. His SAC was a mere .4cfm ON HIS VERY FIRST DIVE! It's not that he was a natural, it's that he has 1/4 my tidal volume.

I am not saying that all the advice posted isn't good, most of it is. I am also not saying that you can't improve, I am sure you can. I am just saying that if you are a big guy like me, you may never be the last guy out of the water.

Vercingetorix
08-24-2007, 11:55
Larry (no, not the first Larry, the other brother Larry),


Many new divers are actually going through the water like this / instead of like this __

Another thing to do is touch your chin to your chest and look under your feet. If you only see the bottom of the ocean floor - your head is too high and your feet are too low. You should see the water behind you.

Thanks for that info. When I swim, see ocean floor, not what's behind me. That'll be my first change. When I've tried keeping my head lower, I thought I was too FAR head-down attitude; I was probably where I should have been.

When I'm not swimming and horizontal, my feet drop. I've moved my tank as far up as I dare; I actually klunk my head on the first stage when I lift my head. I have no weights to adjust (I wear steel BP/W and 3mm suit). Perhaps, heavy fins (Aeris Velocity, not full-foot version)? I'd hate to give those up. I bought them at ST and they are the right balance of speed, power, maneuverabilty, and they don't tire or cramp me.

dallasdivergirl
08-24-2007, 13:05
Larry (no, not the first Larry, the other brother Larry),


Many new divers are actually going through the water like this / instead of like this __

Another thing to do is touch your chin to your chest and look under your feet. If you only see the bottom of the ocean floor - your head is too high and your feet are too low. You should see the water behind you.

Thanks for that info. When I swim, see ocean floor, not what's behind me. That'll be my first change. When I've tried keeping my head lower, I thought I was too FAR head-down attitude; I was probably where I should have been.

When I'm not swimming and horizontal, my feet drop. I've moved my tank as far up as I dare; I actually klunk my head on the first stage when I lift my head. I have no weights to adjust (I wear steel BP/W and 3mm suit). Perhaps, heavy fins (Aeris Velocity, not full-foot version)? I'd hate to give those up. I bought them at ST and they are the right balance of speed, power, maneuverabilty, and they don't tire or cramp me.

I got the taller boots that are 5 mil. My feet are floaty now! I dive with 4 to 6 lbs of lead.

Vercingetorix
08-24-2007, 13:11
I got the taller boots that are 5 mil. My feet are floaty now! I dive with 4 to 6 lbs of lead.Yep, got tall 5m boots since day one.