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cwaniak36
03-05-2009, 13:11
Hello all,
I started my scuba diving lessons this Tuesday, we had 2 hrs theory in class and then we went to the pool.
Everything was going smoothly,
When we started to "dive" ( 3 - 3.5 meters deep ) i cleared my ears with no problem, When we were down there for about 4 -5 min i felt slight discomfort in my ears (maybe we moved a little bit into the deeper depth, i cleared my ears again, but then i felt a real strong pain in my ear. (i didnt force the "clear" unless it felt like i didn't).
The pain dissapeared after few seconds and i was still comfortable, but the feeling inside of my ear is kind of different than in my other ear. There is no pain at all, it just feels "different" ( can't express :P )

I went to a doctor, he looked inside my ear, said its pretty much nothing, you could of got a pain when clearing, because you were sick few weeks ago" ( i did have a small cold indeed ) he also asked me if i had a fever, i didn't ( well it didnt feel like it.) but through out the day i did have a small fever of 37, which by the evening went away , and didn't come back since then.

He told me to take Advil/Tylenol cold for 2-3 days, and if i will not get better to come back.

What do you guys thing about it .

1. no pain ( just feels Different :P )
2. no fever, ( well there was slight one, ... )
3. I feel good i guess... just that different feeling.
4. I am able to clear my ears anytime, without any pain.

Should i be fine going to my next scuba lesson, coming Tuesday?

whitworthsa
03-05-2009, 13:25
37 degrees C is normal body temp. So no fever.

scubadiver888
03-05-2009, 13:58
I've had ear infections. You can have one without a fever but it is pretty easy for a doctor to spot if you have an ear infections. Did you doctor look in your ears, nose and mouth? An infection is usually visible in one of those areas. Although it can be confused for allergies.

As for whether or not you are safe to dive, did you ask your doctor? If he/she didn't know, maybe you need a different doctor.

I know from experience, I had a SEVERE infection (constantly felt dizzy) on a trip to the Caribbean. Went diving anyway (I think it was 9 days of diving in total). When I got back from my trip I went to my doctor. My doctor gave me a :smiley13: look and gave me some penicillin.

mselizann
03-05-2009, 14:56
I had an ear infection once- Under water I was completely disoriented- and kept shaking my head
my dr. could see the infection right away.............

cwaniak36
03-05-2009, 15:03
Yes the doctor looked in my mouth and ears.
He didn't spot anything.
He said i can go ahead with next lesson.

scubadiver888
03-05-2009, 16:17
Yes the doctor looked in my mouth and ears.
He didn't spot anything.
He said i can go ahead with next lesson.
Then whatever we say really shouldn't matter, unless the person posting is a dive doctor.

I can tell you that I'd dive. Ultimately, you'll have to decide for yourself.

Rileybri
03-05-2009, 16:25
37 degrees C is normal body temp. So no fever.
I thought 98.6 F was the normal body temp? What is a "c"??:smiley2:


carry on.........

cwaniak36
03-05-2009, 16:35
36.6 degrees C is normal i thought :P im sure its.

Straegen
03-05-2009, 18:18
Any pain, cracking or odd sensations in the ear when you chew? My guess is you distended some tissue in your ear/sinus so it feels funny, but that is really a wild guess no big deal if that is the problem.

cwaniak36
03-05-2009, 18:55
nothing unusual happening nor pain is felt.
It's just that weird feeling.

Lulubelle
03-05-2009, 20:07
1. Trust your doctor, he/she looked in your ear, none of us did.
2. Body temperatures fluctuate throughout the day, and with viral illnesses, the fluctuations you saw are not clinically significant.
3. Ear anatomy varies from person to person. This can affect how well someone can equalize. Some people can't.
4. Ear infection history, trauma to the ear, etc can affect how well someone can equalize.

DAN and your doc are better sources for medical advice that this forum. Giving someone advice without being able to look in their ear is like diagnosing a rash by phone. Not possible to do well.

Happy Diving!

Straegen
03-06-2009, 02:56
Not that you should put faith in people on the forums, but don't rely on your doctor completely either. I don't think you have anything to worry about and it is good your doc gave you the once over, but if the problem persists get a second opinion preferably from an ENT.

cummings66
03-07-2009, 12:09
One thing I might add. I dove this past weekend with some buddies and earlier in that week I had a cold. To be honest I had issues clearing even though I was well and didn't currently have a cold. No pain though, just not quite normal feeling to me. I couldn't do a third dive however.

For me, there is never pain, pain is not normal no matter what so if you have it something is wrong somewhere. It doesn't mean your sick, it could merely be you're not doing it right. Nobody other than you can tell what your ear is up to, so they can show you how to do the maneuver, tell you not to be forceful, but since they can't feel it there is little way of insuring you're doing it right beyond watching and seeing if you got the motions down.

If the doc said you was good, then I'd trust him and just equalize early and often. More than likely you just didn't do it quickly enough from the sounds of things.

cwaniak36
03-11-2009, 10:11
I went and got a second opinion, and it was positive as well and i got go ahead for yesterdays lesson at the pool.

I was more careful, and watched closely what im doing.
i didn't experience any pain.
The only weird thing that now occurred is that, after we got out from the pool, every time i swallow my ears seem to pop.
it seems to me that it was more severe, last night right after the dive, i thought it will go away after the night, but really didn't, i can still feel my ears pop, every time i swallow. They are no blocked, nor they hurt,
Also if i clear them by closing nose, i can swallow without poping for like 2 seconds, then it comes back to poping.
Should that go away on its own? (the previous problem i wrote about completely disappeared.)

cwaniak36
03-11-2009, 13:10
update* :P

Feels like the poping dropped by 50% in my ears. but still kind of pop's(cracks)

Grin
03-12-2009, 09:52
Your ears are just sensistive. It is not a ear infection. It will just take awhile for your ear drums to toughen up a hair from their new use of being cleared alot. This is normal for new divers to have minor seemingly clogged ears the day after diving. That popping is good sign. That popping is your estation tubes opening and popping which is "clearing". Hopefully both ears do it equally. Many of us have one ear that clears easy and another that takes a little work. What is happeneing is you do your diving and clear a bunch and your ear drums are a hair stressed or loose. They may flem up a hair for a day. A few dive trips and you will likely notice it less and less. It is possible you are clearing a bit more aggressivly than needed which is better than less than needed. If the water is cold a hood may help keep the neck, and ear canals, and ears, a little happier. Possibly reduceing the stress of the clearing of the ears they are experiencing over and over for the first time ever.
Many people have the opposite problem of not being able to get that popping sound. That popping is a sign you rears just equalized. The diving loosened up your ear drums due to constant clearing. They should toughen up and be happy you can clear so easily.

fanatique
03-28-2009, 09:55
I would go with the sensitive ears diagnosis too. The fact that your original problems disappeared when you cleared more frequently is a good sign.

It's good that you're asking questions but I think you're doing fine. You're in an enviable position actually, being able to clear your ears with ease. Keep diving!

boates
03-29-2009, 13:15
I have to use "swimmers ear" (that's 1 brand name) drops after every dive, for me to avoid what your describing. You can buy at the pharmacy, or I'm sure someone here (or a search) could give you the recipe to make it yourself.

Tully Mars
03-30-2009, 09:04
1. Trust your doctor, he/she looked in your ear, none of us did.
2. Body temperatures fluctuate throughout the day, and with viral illnesses, the fluctuations you saw are not clinically significant.
3. Ear anatomy varies from person to person. This can affect how well someone can equalize. Some people can't.
4. Ear infection history, trauma to the ear, etc can affect how well someone can equalize.

DAN and your doc are better sources for medical advice that this forum. Giving someone advice without being able to look in their ear is like diagnosing a rash by phone. Not possible to do well.

Happy Diving!

I think that's good advice.

navyhmc
03-30-2009, 09:57
37 degrees C is normal body temp. So no fever.
I thought 98.6 F was the normal body temp? What is a "c"?? :smiley2: carry on.........

36.6 degrees C is normal i thought :P im sure its.

Actually 98.6f is 37c so no fever at 37c :smiley20:

John Yaskowich
03-30-2009, 11:20
I have to use "swimmers ear" (that's 1 brand name) drops after every dive, for me to avoid what your describing. You can buy at the pharmacy, or I'm sure someone here (or a search) could give you the recipe to make it yourself.

Check out the medical FAQ on DAN, DAN Divers Alert Network (http://www.diversalertnetwork.org/medical/faq/Default.aspx)
especially the one on "Surfers Ear (Exotoses)"
From the DAN site:
Rinse both ears out with fresh water to wash out contaminated water and salt, which is hydrophilic.

Instill a couple of drops of 5% acetic acid (vinegar) in 60% ethyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol suffices) in to both ears. You may use a commercial solution like Otic Domeboro (prescription only) to treat your ears after every dive or exposure to water.