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ianr33
03-08-2009, 18:15
Just came across this video. Only one word for it!

In the Realm of Fangorn Forest on Vimeo (http://vimeo.com/3528068)

Splitlip
03-08-2009, 18:22
OMG!
That is spectacular! I am not a caver, but that is so off the charts.

Splitlip
03-08-2009, 18:23
also note when watching the vid, the buoyancy control. Obviousely very important here. Ceiling and floor formations.

Rainer
03-08-2009, 18:24
Yeah, quite nice. As good as the MX stuff. Thanks for posting that up.

drifter136
03-08-2009, 18:52
Wow! is right. Absolutely beautiful! Thank you for finding and posting that. I noticed the lead diver didn't carry any tanks on his back. Is that to lesson the chance of banging into and damaging the stalactites or for some other reason? That 200w HMI light was quite impressive.

ektess1
03-08-2009, 19:12
That was incredible. Even my wife who hates the idea of cave diving found it breathtaking.
Every diver should try to dive as well as these guys. They are my new role models.
Wow

UCFKnightDiver
03-08-2009, 19:13
incredible but idk about the buoyancy looks like he was touching the cave at one point...not sure why his buoyancy seemed spot on the rest of the time

navyhmc
03-08-2009, 19:26
Totally cool. I was impressed by the 25,000 feet of cave.

ianr33
03-08-2009, 19:57
I noticed the lead diver didn't carry any tanks on his back. Is that to lesson the chance of banging into and damaging the stalactites or for some other reason?

He is sidemounting. Its getting very popular for cave diving. You are correct in that it lets you get through tight (horizontally) passages without damaging anything. Also lets you scrape through very tight bedding planes that would be totally impossible with backmount.

Other advantages are that the 2 tanks are totally redundant. Any single failure will only result in the loss of gas from one tank.Best of all aging knees dont have to lug double steel tanks down to the water!
It is a little more complex in that you need to switch regs every 500 psi or so but thats not a big deal. I started sidemounting a few months ago. Bit of a learning curve at first but now I love it.

UCFKnightDiver
03-08-2009, 20:05
you mean tight (vertically) dont you? I guess you can easily manipulate the tanks too eg take them off and push them ahead of you which would be horizontally.

ianr33
03-08-2009, 20:33
Yes. Good catch! I was thinking of Horizontal Bedding Planes. Duh!

In a tall,thin ,restriction you can turn sideways with one tank above and the other below. If it gets really tight then yes,tanks can be taken off. (But I'm not into that,at least not yet)

texdiveguy
03-08-2009, 20:56
Very exciting to say the least!!!!!

IrishSquid
03-08-2009, 21:27
Sweet Jesus! Makes me want to sell the family, so I can get the certification and gear to go dive it tomorrow. That was phenomenal! :smiley20:

Black-Gorrilla
03-08-2009, 21:39
WOW was the right tittle to this thread!
Awesome video quality, and incredible cave!!!

in_cavediver
03-08-2009, 22:08
I'm with Ian, just started sidemounting about 6 months ago. It is, on paper, only marginally more complicated. It took a bit more to sort gear out to get it right but it is a lot nicer to haul tanks via a dolly rather than on my back.

Man, I need to go cave diving again, its been almost 6 months!

Landlocked Amphibian
03-08-2009, 22:53
Sweet Jesus! Makes me want to sell the family, so I can get the certification and gear to go dive it tomorrow. That was phenomenal! :smiley20:

If you find a market to sell you family on, let me know and I will join you.

That is amazing!! That will have to go on my places to dive before I die list.

Vercingetorix
03-09-2009, 09:28
As I watched, I wondered: what caused this cave to flood. In order for the thicker stalagmites and stalactites to form, this cavern was bone dry for millions of years. During this time, the formations slowly evolved.

Then, something suddenly happened, which flooded the cavern. Some crack was formed somewhere that caused it to flood with ground water. How long ago did that occur? And why? Tectonic plate shift, perhaps?

Heavy D
03-09-2009, 11:44
WOW, is right. That was a great video. I have no idea, but are caves as fragile once they are submerged as they are when they are not? It just made me wonder when I saw him touching that ring and large stalagmite in part of the video.

Landlocked Amphibian
03-09-2009, 13:03
As I watched, I wondered: what caused this cave to flood. In order for the thicker stalagmites and stalactites to form, this cavern was bone dry for millions of years. During this time, the formations slowly evolved.

Then, something suddenly happened, which flooded the cavern. Some crack was formed somewhere that caused it to flood with ground water. How long ago did that occur? And why? Tectonic plate shift, perhaps?

You beat me to the question. After watching this last night I got thinking that the cave would have had to be dry at one point. I have been waiting to have time to post the same question all morning.


WOW, is right. That was a great video. I have no idea, but are caves as fragile once they are submerged as they are when they are not? It just made me wonder when I saw him touching that ring and large stalagmite in part of the video.

Along the same line, I wonder if the water is slowly dissolving the formations.

UCFKnightDiver
03-09-2009, 13:23
yes the water which is slightly acidic is slowly disolving all the rock and limestone how do you think the cave got there? Its just really really slow.

Sometimes the caves can be more stable when filled with water because it has the water pressure pusshing up from within as to are they more fragile or not? ya got me.

navyhmc
03-09-2009, 13:31
Not a geologist, even in my dreams, just recallng my Junior Earth Science class of 1978. A lot of these were formed due to slightly acidic waters eroding the softer limestone, etc. they were happy water filled tubes until the ice ages came along and dropped the earths oceans an estimated 200'-300'. The the formations were made in typical fashion via mineral laden waters seeping through cracks. At least that's my working theory...

But hey, what do I know? I'm a paramedic.

ianr33
03-09-2009, 14:40
Sounds good to me.

Cave geology is one of the fascinating aspects of cave diving. Huge chambers like the ones in the first video were formed above the water table (vadose zone) That also allowed the formation of all the uh,formations.
Caves formed below the water table (phreatic caves) tend to have circular tunnels.

Look at this video (Little River) to see the difference
Little River on Vimeo (http://www.vimeo.com/924184)

The keyhole shaped passages have been formed by two mechanisms. First,phreatic cave formation beneath the water table and later by vadose action (streams) eroding the bottom of the passage.

RoyN
03-09-2009, 22:10
Wow! I should get back to the Cenote cave and finish that cave dive with my mom. :)

baywatch106
05-20-2009, 09:03
Wow! Great video. Makes you want to get cave certified.

navyhmc
05-20-2009, 15:06
Wow! I should get back to the Cenote cave and finish that cave dive with my mom. :)

You left your mom in the cave???? :smiley36:

paperdesk
05-20-2009, 15:54
Thanks for posting this amazing video!

gee
05-20-2009, 16:48
I missed out on the full effect of the video because of a slow connection but, it was still amazing.

Aquatrax
05-20-2009, 17:47
Incredible!

UofTOrange
05-23-2009, 10:49
Words cannot describe how incredible that is. I would love to take up caves, but I'm quite away from being to that level. One day though, one day

cruzan
05-23-2009, 14:50
Very cool not quite ready for that myself though.

Vlane
05-26-2009, 18:11
Amazing video to say the least. I think it would be kind of eerie and exciting at the same time to dive something like that, hope i don't develop claustrophobia!

plot
06-22-2009, 19:09
oh wow... how would you like to do a lost line zero viz drill in there?

mrmccoy
06-22-2009, 19:22
WOW is the correct word for that! That is amazing