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rogerbn
03-09-2009, 15:18
Does any one have a good routine that they use to build stamina for diving? I now just getting in to diving and love it. The only issue is that I am over weight and need to lose weight. I would like to know how some people work out to help benefit there diving and just increase their stamina at the same time.

Rainer
03-09-2009, 15:20
I go running.

I try to eat well.

CPTOZZY
03-09-2009, 18:41
Swimming Laps is a great low impact cardiovascular workout. You won't stress your back or knees like you will from running, especially if you are overweight. You also get the added benefits of a combined upper, lower and abdominal/core workout. You will develop muscle memory which will help you move more efficiently through the water while diving, thus conserving air.

Rainer
03-09-2009, 18:43
Swimming is great exercise, and will help with strength. That said, those new to exercise rarely swim hard enough for it to be very helpful for cardio fitness.

If you want low impact but decent cardio, an elliptical trainer is s/t to consider.

Aquatrax
03-09-2009, 18:53
I prefer the Stairmaster and Stationary bike for Cardio. 30 minutes each with 30 minutes of 10lb Medicine ball work in between to keep the heart rate up. Start slow and build up your time and intensity.

nutrition wise, avoid all restaurants with drive thru windows.

FWIW, that's my routine

chicken
03-09-2009, 19:02
Four days a week at LA Fitness...spin and boot camp. Not only have I lost weight but I don't suck an AL80 down like a cold beer anymore! My doctor told me the formula is simple, eat less and exercise more. He was right and I feel much better. The first month or so is the hardest as your body gets used to the new routine, it's all gravy after that.

CompuDude
03-09-2009, 19:27
S*x. Lots and lots of it.

Just saying. Why do workouts have to be boring?

Oh, and eat well.

;)

(Seriously, any sort of aerobic exercise is going to be very helpful. The leg muscles get the biggest workout in the water, the arms and back get the brunt on dry land, schlepping heavy gear.)

tedwhiteva
03-09-2009, 19:27
Does any one have a good routine that they use to build stamina for diving? I now just getting in to diving and love it. The only issue is that I am over weight and need to lose weight. I would like to know how some people work out to help benefit there diving and just increase their stamina at the same time.
Swim - but not just laps with goggles. I have found using mask, fins, snorkle to swim laps - a few laps just kicking, arms at side (kinda like snorkling, except use frog kick at least part of the time), then a few laps freestyle just with your arms, stream lining the fins behind. 1/2 hour of that, several times of week does great things.:smiley20:

Skred
03-09-2009, 20:05
S*x. Lots and lots of it.

Just saying. Why do workouts have to be boring?

Oh, and eat well.

;)


Dude, you're my hero!:smiley36:

To the OP...

1. Cardio, cardio, cardio...
2. Core training.
2. Eat smart. Keep track of what you eat by using free sites like Calorie Counter, Diet Tracking, Food Journal, Nutrition Facts at The Daily Plate (http://www.dailyplate.com). Learn to burn more calories than you consume.
3. Eat less food more often (5 small meals per day) to keep energy levels consistent.

Good luck!:smiley20:

Black-Gorrilla
03-09-2009, 20:23
I prefer the Stairmaster and Stationary bike for Cardio. 30 minutes each with 30 minutes of 10lb Medicine ball work in between to keep the heart rate up. Start slow and build up your time and intensity.

nutrition wise, avoid all restaurants with drive thru windows.

FWIW, that's my routine


That stairmaster is a bi*ch!! but it really gets you going, and does a bit for your legs as well.


Anything easy on the knees will be good. Running is good, but pretty high impact, so i'd avoid that.

Find out if some place near you offers Spinning classes. The first one will kill you, and make you hate life, the second one will be a bit easier, and after that you get used to it, and just do it. The nice thing about spinning is that you control the resistance, so if it's just too much, you turn it down a bit, but never stop moving. 1hr of that a few times a week does wonders!!
I've been doing it for a few weeks now, at least 3 times a week, and love the results!! easy on the knees, makes your legs strong, and does wonders for stamina!

cummings66
03-09-2009, 21:26
I'm hitting the gym 6 days a week, alternate muscle groups so that each only gets worked about 3 times a week. Got to allow them time to recover. I don't jog because my knees don't like it, but I do swim and can do a mile. Until I started doing strength training I would swim a mile one day, a quarter the next, then a mile. I did that every single day unless I was diving. To be honest, it didn't seem to help me as much as the strength training does.

Lulubelle
03-09-2009, 21:43
S*x. Lots and lots of it.

Just saying. Why do workouts have to be boring?

Oh, and eat well.

;)

(Seriously, any sort of aerobic exercise is going to be very helpful. The leg muscles get the biggest workout in the water, the arms and back get the brunt on dry land, schlepping heavy gear.)

:smiley27:They should make more guys like you Compudude!!!

To the OP. Everyone's ideas are solid. Let me add the following...

What do YOU like to do/What WILL you do?

If you don't enjoy something, you won't last a long time at it. I am a very strong swimmer, but I hate swimming in pools. But I DO like to be outdoors. So I hike, walk, bike, etc outside. I have found the MOST benefit to my diving to be from strength training. But I hate standard machine/bench stuff. So I hired a trainer who has me doing crazy full body caveman stuff and kickboxing. I LOVE it! And I have gotten much stronger which has helped my diving. My point is, you will be most likely to succeed at something you actually enjoy.

As for food, not knowing anything about your medical/diet history, it is hard to know if any of these posted suggestions will help you or not. Journal every morsel that you touch for a week or so. Record portion size, calories if you can figure them out, etc. Be honest, this is for your eyes only. Read it. You will easily see where there is room for improvement. Make one change at a time and make sure to keep some things in your diet that you enjoy so that you don't feel deprived. Don't be afraid to see a dietician if you need some help. And some of the online sites for keeping track of intake are really terrific.

Good luck, welcome to diving.

Straegen
03-10-2009, 10:24
If you just want to build stamina and improve your V02, wind sprints and high rep/low weight while keeping your heart rate up (jumping jacks in between sets or running in place is good).

If you want to loose weight, start by making small changes every couple weeks. First thing is to cut out the cokes/soda or other sweetened beverages and that includes diet drinks (for many people that is 4-6lbs a month right there). Then start making a better choice each day when it comes to food. Keep a food journal... I recommend Calorie Counter Database - Free Online Diet Program (http://caloriecount.about.com). Try to keep the diet balanced so no fad diets such as low carb, low fat, etc. Keep in mind this isn't a race and most people that start out trying to do everything fail. Allow yourself a "free" meal each week where you can eat pretty much whatever you want in a reasonable quantity. Most people can hold off a craving for a few days and it builds in an "I just slipped" meal so you don't feel like you are cheating.

To continue the weight loss beyond diet consider using activities rather than strictly gym time. I maintain four activities per week and these include walking the dogs for a couple miles, backpacking, kayaking, gym, etc. It also includes things like cleaning out the garage or manually washing and waxing the car. This system allows you to get things done around the house as well as go out and enjoy yourself rather than be just a gym rat. That said I require myself to get to the gym at least once per week and I try to make it at least two.

Last thing, finding a support group can really help but I strongly suggest you stop looking at a scale and if they do measure you just don't let them tell you amount. In the beginning it can be a real motivator (usually when you don't really need it), but everyone hits a wall from time to time and it can really crush a persons motivation. Look every 3-6 months and if you have stuck with the above tips the scale will show the progress.

DivingAnarchy.info
03-10-2009, 20:29
When I got promoted into a 'behind the computer and into the boardroom position' I implemented a few small habit changes as I don't have hours to spend in a gym:

I don't take escalaters and elevaters anymore but take the stairs up and down.
When the distance is less than 15 minutes walking I walk.
No more softdrinks during the week but water (and coffee)
No more beer but wine.

rogerbn
03-11-2009, 09:45
Everyone thanks for the reply. I live in an area were I can get lake access but I would have to drive out of the way. My question is now how do most people at a gym treat people at the pool? Are they relaxed or high strung? Do the gyms have time limits at the pool? The biggest question of all is would it be best to get a member ship to a gym or try to do a home work out?

Airborne!
03-11-2009, 10:17
In your case exercise is really only part of the equation with your diet being another part. Not knowing your personality, your past history, current health risks or real fitness level I can only offer one suggestion. Find a good Personal Trainer that matches your personality and let him or her get you started off in the right direction. Even if you only use the Personal Trainer once a week it is still helpful because you have someone to answer to and motivate you to succeed. Once exercise and proper nutrition become a habit you can take off on your own if you desire. If you can find one that does Scuba then all the better.

Skred
03-11-2009, 10:53
Everyone thanks for the reply. I live in an area were I can get lake access but I would have to drive out of the way. My question is now how do most people at a gym treat people at the pool? Are they relaxed or high strung? Do the gyms have time limits at the pool? The biggest question of all is would it be best to get a member ship to a gym or try to do a home work out?


I second Airborne's advice. Back when I made the decision to get my sedentary behind up and moving, I realized from previous failed efforts that I lacked the knowledge I needed to really be successful. I joined a gym and hired a trainer. Turned out to be one of the best decisions I have ever made. I learned a lot about what does and doesn't work, and why. Once I got the foundation for diet and exercise established, I shed the trainer and went my own way.

Granted this is not an inexpensive undertaking and it is easy to balk when confronted with the costs, but the benefits derived from it are worth every dime...and more.

skdvr
03-11-2009, 10:55
When you think cardio you need to think HIIT (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-intensity_interval_training). It is way more effective than jumping on a treadmill or a bike and just going at a constant pace for an hour.

Weight training too it great. For building lean muscle I like to full body workout each time I lift weights (Mon, Wed, Fri). Doing 1 set of 10 or 12 of one excercise and then within 30 sec starting another muscle set of 10 or 12. I go through the circuit 2 or 3 times depending on how much time I have. You can get a great workout in 30 min or less...

Phil

Straegen
03-11-2009, 13:25
Swimming at quality gyms is usually a lane thing much like at swim center. You have a lane for as long as you need it but it is usually courtesy to only do 20-30 minutes if people are waiting. Many gyms have a public pool as well which is pretty free form. You also have to be aware of the gym schedule as they often take over the pool for classes.

Trainer if you can afford it is always a good idea. The buddy system is good as well. Both help keep you honest and will push you more than if you are alone. If money is an issue, hard to beat a simple dumbbell and yoga ball at home setup.

Interval training is great for building stamina and cardio, but not as good at burning fat. Long workouts at a zone 1 or 2 heart rate is better for fat burning.

3rdEye
03-11-2009, 14:10
Four days a week at LA Fitness...spin and boot camp. Not only have I lost weight but I don't suck an AL80 down like a cold beer anymore! My doctor told me the formula is simple, eat less and exercise more. He was right and I feel much better. The first month or so is the hardest as your body gets used to the new routine, it's all gravy after that.

what's the boot camp all about? I'm a member at an LA fitness, not sure if mine offers one....but I'd be curious.

I've considered doing some crossfit type bootcamp stuff....but it's generally really expensive

Straegen
03-11-2009, 14:53
Bootcamp around here is a separate deal where you sign up for a few short weeks usually early morning or afternoon. "Drill sergeants" run your arse into the ground and most people get really pushed. It is a great workout for those that are generally fit but have been sitting for 2-3 months and want to shake the rust off.

cummings66
03-11-2009, 15:13
Doing cardio exercises isn't the way to go if you want to lose weight. After a few hours your RMR returns to normal, a better way is a full body workout which gives you a higher RMR which can last as long as 48 hours in studies.

The key is you work your body hard, all of it. When you make the muscles work they need to repair themselves over a period of time, which is also why you don't exercise every single day. If you do that you can actually slow your progress a LOT.

Eat as much natural food as you can, avoid refined garbage and eat normal portions. Don't skimp on fat or carbs, you need both for your body to work at peak performance. If you skip on carbs you will lose weight, water, and muscle which then leads to a lower RMR which leads in the end to a fat gain and less muscle. Ever see a guy who's skinny yet fat? That happens quite often with low carb diets.

In the end, act like nature wants you to. In nature animals don't do long duration anything, it's all sprint from point a to b. That's why wind sprints are good, plus it trains your heart. You need your heart to be able to work at peak performance all through the scale, not just at the top of it. You can simulate that on a treadmill, run for 1 minute at 8 mph, then walk at 4 mph for 1.5 minutes. Now run at 10 mph for 1 minute and walk again for 1.5 minutes at 4 mph. Repeat 4 times. Very good workout that's way better than just walking fast, or jogging. The reason is you have various rates going on, your heart will work at different levels allowing it to have a wider range of good solid function. So this way it's not either full on or full off, you've used it midrange and gained some tone there. The heart is a very important muscle.

Go to the Mayo Clinic's website and look under their fitness category, lots of tested tips there that might help you. There is a lot of hype out there, just like fad diets, much of it won't work in the long term.

Regarding pools, at our local YMCA the pool has dedicated lanes for lap swimming, the main pool is open for free swim and also has classes. So you choose what you want to do and be there at that time. I've never seen anybody make fun of anybody there.

For what it's worth, free weights are better than machines. Machines are convienient so I use them.

So eat less processed food and start doing outdoor things and you'll start losing weight and gain strength. Hit the gym when you can to make it happen faster.

Straegen
03-11-2009, 19:57
I agree with many of the points above, but when it comes to loosing fat I would disagree with not doing long bouts of activity. Long periods of activity at a lower target heart rate threshold is the conventional and I would argue proven wisdom.

cummings66
03-11-2009, 22:05
The arguement centers around the RMR. If it's higher you burn more calories, if it's lower you burn less. So, you want it high. You get it that way by increasing muscle density. Do whatever you can to add the muscle and you will naturally increase the RMR. Muscles grow by how? Use, but what kind of use? That is the trick and the balance. You won't grow them by a gentle workout consisting of a simple 2 mph walk. You might use more calories walking than watching tv, but you won't make your RMR go up and you certainly won't increase your strength.

The trick is in the balance. Muscles get used to working a certain way, work it easy and it gets used to that and you hit a point where no further gains occur. Up your training a notch and you will get past that point at which time you can change the program again.

Again, if you work it too hard you hit a point where there are no gains because you are not allowing sufficient rest periods to rebuild the tissues. So it takes both hard work, then light work. Thus, a natural is sprints combined with light walking.

You've seen some people talk about spin classes which are the rage now. They work and if you look at it you'll see it does exactly what I'm saying, you work hard, then easier, then hard, etc.

There is no one answer except that the only answer all agree on is control your diet and make sure it's balanced. A healthy diet goes a long ways regardless of exercise program you choose. I lost 50 lbs just by changing what I ate. No exercise involved. I also lost muscle and gained back 20 lbs because my RMR dropped because I had less muscle mass. Natural effect of that is fewer calories burned and with the same consumption weight gain. It's a vicious circle, you must add muscle to the mix or you will gain back the weight. I'm not talking muscle bound, just toned muscle.

To be honest though, Zone 3 workouts are considered the best for raising the metabolism and burning the most amount of fat, from what I've read that is.

Straegen
03-11-2009, 22:31
I am well versed in your points and I agree that performing a quality muscle building regime is a great idea since it has excellent residual benefits. However mixing in long low threshold training is IMO a better solution for fat loss. A persons body especially after a certain age does not like to destroy fat cells in order to gain energy. Most people tend to burn excess carbs, protein and fat first and when you push a body it tends to break down muscle before fat since it is easier to metabolize. If your workout is too short, you simply aren't going to destroy many fat cells. If you work out longer but harder on a restricted calorie diet, your body will tend to destroy muscle in addition to fat to get fuel to the body quicker (the base concepts of anaerobic... fat needs excess oxygen to burn which is aerobic). Hitting the gym for a high load 30 minute workout four times a week is going to burn more calories but isn't going to burn as many fat cells as two one hour long workouts with integrated low rep weights keeping a subject in their target zone 1 and 2 heart ranges. There is way more I can get into on this (pre/post workout metabolism changes, VO2 maxes, anaerobic vs. aerobic, etc), but being a diving board I doubt anyone wants to hear it.

In order to prevent muscle memory from robbing you of calorie burning, it is best to vary a workout since you are correct that doing repetitive training teaches your muscles to be very efficient at those specific exercises. This is why it is good (and often necessary) to change up BOTH anaerobic and aerobic exercises.

skdvr
03-12-2009, 07:01
I am with Matt on this... I have been using HIIT for years with very good results... For about 2 years I was incharge on the Fat Body Platoon in my unit in the Marine Corps, and implemented this type of training and never had a Marine that I could not get back into shape. Lots of them spend many many hours running and just could not shed the extra weight... Something that stuck out in my head a few months ago while I was watching The Today Show on NBC, they had a trainer on the show talking about good excercise habits and about how many people think that they can get on a treadmill for an hour or so and be good to go. Then he took the cameras into the gym and said look at the size of the people on the treadmills that have been slaving away for hours a day, and take a look at the people that are lifting weights. The number of overweight people on the treadmills far outweighed the over weight people that were lifting weights. I am not saying that runnign is a bad thing. If you wont do anything else it is WAY better than nothing, but it is not the best for loosign weight and trimming up. You will burn far more calories throughout the day from 30 min of HIIT or from 30 min of weight training than you will from 1.5 hours of constant speed running on the treadmill.

Here is an article (http://www.dragondoor.com/articler/mode3/392/) that I just came across. I have also been reading The Tao of Survival Underwater (http://www.addheliumstore.com/the-tao-of-survival-underwater.html) by Tom Mount and many others. If you know anything about Tom Mount you know that he is a very fit man and he is in his late 60's I think. Anyway, in the begining of this book he talks about the importance of being physically fit and diving, espically tech diving. He goes on to list the many reasons why HIIT is better for your heart, to be honest a good bit of it gets way to technical for me. He calls it something other than HIIT too, but it is the same thing. So if you want to pick up a great diving book that has some great info on staying physically fit I would pick up a copy...

Phil

Straegen
03-12-2009, 08:12
I would state again that repetitive aerobic (such as a treadmill or jogging every day) AND anaerobic (such as a bench press or squat) done over and over will continually produce diminished returns when it comes to fat burning (and muscle strengthening). Changing up your aerobic is as important as changing up your anaerobic. A good workout for fat burning uses BOTH in a longer session at a lower heart rate. 30 minute high intensity workouts aerobic or anaerobic are not good fat burners by comparison. Pushing your limits in long sessions is not efficient to destroying fat cells either (hour long spin class for example).

Pilates and yoga are successful at dropping weight because they often keep the heart rate in zone 1 or 2 for extended periods of time.

skdvr
03-12-2009, 08:33
I would state again that repetitive aerobic (such as a treadmill or jogging every day) AND anaerobic (such as a bench press or squat) done over and over will continually produce diminished returns when it comes to fat burning (and muscle strengthening). Changing up your aerobic is as important as changing up your anaerobic. A good workout for fat burning uses BOTH in a longer session at a lower heart rate. 30 minute high intensity workouts aerobic or anaerobic are not good fat burners by comparison. Pushing your limits in long sessions is not efficient to destroying fat cells either (hour long spin class for example).

Pilates and yoga are successful at dropping weight because they often keep the heart rate in zone 1 or 2 for extended periods of time.

We are going to have to agree to disagree:smiley2:

Just my opinion from what I have seen work and not work.

The obvious is also a good diet which I did not mention previously but I think that is just understood. No matter what kind of workout you are doing, if you are eating junk your body will be junk...

Phil

Straegen
03-12-2009, 09:51
There certainly is room for debate. The problem for me is telling someone to avoid aerobic for weights. Both have their place and a good workout in my book will have you doing both throughout a workout. Weight training alone does not build cardiovascular health and in the end a persons health is measured more by their cardio fitness compared to their PB on a bench aside from the fact that a consistently changing cardio at least while you are exercising burns more fat.

Get your heartrate up doing about 15 minutes on a cardio machine, do your weight sets on a yoga ball/balance board and perform a cardio exercise between sets to keep your heart rate up (jumping jacks, squat thrusts, etc). Followed by 5-10 minutes of crunches. Finish off with 10-15 minutes in the pool or on a cardio machine. Do that three times a week targeting different muscle groups each day during the weight portion (upper front, lower, upper back). Watch your food intake by calorie counting staying under 2k calories per day (3 meals 2 snacks no exceptions and no saving up for a big meal)... you will loose weight, your balance will improve, your VO2 max will increase, your core will be stronger and your cardio health will be much better. Remember to vary your exercises. Add an activity such as cleaning the house or washing the car with a weight pack on and you can always replace one or two workout sessions (try to keep it to just one) with an outdoor activity such as hiking, kayaking, etc.

cummings66
03-12-2009, 10:14
Something I should clarify. I agree that doing a workout on things like treadmills can be good, long workouts are not necessary. If you look at medical studies which can be found on places like the mayo clinic, and other known sites similar to that you will see that they have shown that long sessions are no more productive than a shorter session as long as the short session meets certain criteria. The short sessions must push you to work, you can't baby your body.

If you look at sites which discuss the zone system you will see that they are not advocating a long slow workout, they start with zone 1 until you can do 2 until you can do 3 and then 4 or 5 as you progress. Zone 3 is considered the highest you can do and burn fat, once you pass zone 3 you burn glucose and that isn't what you want if fat burning is your goal. Passing it is good for the heart and increasing strength, but it's not what your goal is to lose fat.

The theory is that you start with 1 and warm up, move to 2 and increase the workout until you can hit 3. Move there and keep it there for about 20 minutes. The first one is normally a 5 minute run, the second 5 to 10 and the third 20 minutes. This is not an hour upon hour deal, nor do any of them advocate that from what I've read. If you're going to do the zone system you need to know what heart rates to target for each zone. The maximum heart rate is the one where you start to produce and introduce into the blood stream lactic acid (I think they call that point LT). You'll know that rate because it will be where you start to breathe heavy, can't carry on a conversation easily, and your muscles will burn, feeling is subjective. That's the point you never exceed because if you do you start burning glucose instead of fat. Zone 3 bumps up against that point and zone 3 is the fastest fat burn. Or you can pay $150 or so, get hooked up to a mask and machine which gets that point figured out easily. Bear in mind as you increase your strength that point goes up so you eventually after a couple months will need to up your routine. The body gets used to any point eventually and it takes more to get the same results, it's how we work. So if your target heart rate is 140 after a couple months it might be 150, and so on.

IMO only, I'm not a PT, I think a combination of the two is what helps. Use the zone system to finish off the strength training. That's what I'm doing and I am seeing results. I haven't lost weight yet, but I have lost a pant size. My back feels better and I can carry my double steel cylinders easier, and I don't hurt after multiple dives like I used to. Strength training gets you the higher RMR which burns calories even just setting there. Lose fat alone and your RMR does nothing to increase which doesn't help you in the long run. Long term results have always been best when you add muscle. So I think, diet first, strenth training second, fat burning third. Programs that do all of that work the best. Like Phil said, I see many more obese people on the treadmills like hamsters plugging away at a plodding pace, never doing anything to lose weight. It takes variability in the program to do that. Go fast, then slow, lift weights etc. The easiest way to do the zone system is by sprints outside up a hill. Sprint up, jog down. Repeat. There is no need to spend hours upon hours doing any one program, after a point the returns go away and you just waste valuable time doing nothing. Ask any trainer, if I do this 6 hours a day every single day will I lose weight faster than 1 hour a day every other day. You might be surprised to find they won't tell you to do it every single day for long periods of time. The new guys anyhow. Conventional wisdom is changing in this area. High Fruitose Cornsyrup products in particular should be avoided like the plague. There are charts that show the rise in obesity coinciding with the introduction and increase in usage of that one product. It's in lots of stuff, read the labels.

For what it's worth, I think it's about 120 lbs for the double steel cylinders and BP/W setup. I find it easier to carry those now. Phil has seen me minus the dive gear, I'm not fat nor am I skinny. I've got a gut I'm working on losing through diet and upping my RMR. It is going away now slowly and I have added a bit to my bulk but not much. More definition mostly, not bulk. Before I wasn't fat, but you couldn't see the muscles if I wanted to show you. Now you can. Just not like a body builder.

Straegen (http://forum.scubatoys.com/../members/straegen.html) didn't I see you lost a lot of weight.

mm2002
03-21-2009, 19:01
Just thinking about all this makes me tired. :smiley36:

cummings66
03-22-2009, 10:22
I have increased the weight I can handle with my legs by 50 lbs, that's repetitive not max single weight. I can walk farther than before at a quicker pace and I can lift my doubles more easily and not hurt when I'm done after a day of diving.

So the regime is working for me. I have not lost weight though, 1 lb doesn't count IMO. I have lost a pant size which says something is working.

setesh
03-22-2009, 11:31
Another one for jogging/running. I also lay off weightlifting for a week or so before.

fanatique
03-24-2009, 17:49
Google the Tabata method of interval training. Most efficient method to improve both aerobic and anaerobic fitness.

cummings66
03-24-2009, 19:45
Very similar to what I was saying earlier, didn't know it had a name. The key thing being most of the studies are saying the same thing, long continuous duration exercise such as what you get by jogging is not as effective as a shorter duration event such as this. Sprinting and then walking is what I was referring to, the various rates have been shown scientifically to be better than just jogging or running.

fanatique
03-24-2009, 23:42
Not just shorter duration, the key is to do short burst followed by even shorter rest period. Killer workout, especially if you consider time spent to results achieved ratio. And the 20:10 of the Tabata method is scientifically proven to be the optimum if you already have a constance cadence jogging/running regime already.

mksmith713
03-26-2009, 12:53
[quote=CompuDude;279566]S*x. Lots and lots of it.

Oh, and eat well.

;)[quote]

Don't the two go hand in hand?

fanatique
03-30-2009, 14:56
S*x. Lots and lots of it.

Oh, and eat well.

;)

Don't the two go hand in hand?Depends. Are you a diver? :smiley2:

mm2002
03-30-2009, 19:57
Depends. Are you a diver? :smiley2:

Actually, I can't imagine diving while wearing depends. They add a lot of buoyancy. Just sayin'.

aperkins
04-02-2009, 09:00
Depends. Are you a diver? :smiley2:

Actually, I can't imagine diving while wearing depends. They add a lot of buoyancy. Just sayin'.

You are obviously not a female drysuit diver:smiley36:

mm2002
04-02-2009, 19:02
Depends. Are you a diver? :smiley2:

Actually, I can't imagine diving while wearing depends. They add a lot of buoyancy. Just sayin'.

You are obviously not a female drysuit diver:smiley36:


Touche' !!! :smiley20:

CompuDude
04-02-2009, 19:06
Depends. Are you a diver? :smiley2:

Actually, I can't imagine diving while wearing depends. They add a lot of buoyancy. Just sayin'.

You are obviously not a female drysuit diver:smiley36:


Touche' !!! :smiley20:

The fairer sex now has options other than Depends.

mm2002
04-02-2009, 19:15
Depends. Are you a diver? :smiley2:

Actually, I can't imagine diving while wearing depends. They add a lot of buoyancy. Just sayin'.

You are obviously not a female drysuit diver:smiley36:


Touche' !!! :smiley20:

The fairer sex now has options other than Depends.


...and that's got to be good news for those under the age of 70 who still want to "look good". Any figures as for the differences in buoyancy characteristics?
Just wondering.

CompuDude
04-02-2009, 21:06
Depends. Are you a diver? :smiley2:

Actually, I can't imagine diving while wearing depends. They add a lot of buoyancy. Just sayin'.

You are obviously not a female drysuit diver:smiley36:


Touche' !!! :smiley20:

The fairer sex now has options other than Depends.


...and that's got to be good news for those under the age of 70 who still want to "look good". Any figures as for the differences in buoyancy characteristics?
Just wondering.

I'm talking about diving, bud, what you are on about? :P

It's just an "adapter" that allows normal use of a pee valve.