PDA

View Full Version : Fiji F11 - First time with Strobe



Reg
03-23-2009, 05:03
I've borrowed a friends D2000 Strobe to try it out with my F11.

This the first time i've used a strobe with this camera and normally I only use the camera with manaual white balance.

To start, i've left the camera on automatic with the flash on. (i'm covered the internal flash with gaffer tape so the light doesn't get through.) I've found i'm getting good results from Macro shots, but shooting fish and sharks...I'm still getting back scatter and really 'green' shots.

Any suggestion with using this strobe with a compact digital?

CompuDude
03-23-2009, 14:20
There is a limit to a strobe's range and effectiveness. Go beyond that, and you'll still have green pictures... PLUS backscatter.

Generally you'll want to pull the strobe arm to the side so as to NOT light the subject head on. Sometimes you may even want to point the strobe dead ahead so only the edge of the light hits the subject, which is centered. That's the best way to help reduce backscatter.

Generally, when using a strobe I set my white balance to cloudy.

Reg
03-28-2009, 17:45
I've been using the camera on Auto, which doesn't let me change the white balance. If i switch to manual I use my slate to calibrate the white balance. Do i still need to do this using a strobe?

Nemrod
03-28-2009, 18:15
I would not put any sort of "gaffer" tape over the camera strobe. This could very likely damage the strobe. Instead use exposed color positive (slide film) as a light shield. The exposed film lets infrared through and the Inon strobes trigger fine on infrared only.

N

Reg
04-25-2009, 17:31
Thanks for your comments. Through trial and error, things have improved. See Attached.

gee
04-25-2009, 18:00
Reg,

I was interested in seeing your improved images but your attachments are missing.
Thanks for your comments. Through trial and error, things have improved. See Attached.

Nemrod
04-26-2009, 00:29
I've borrowed a friends D2000 Strobe to try it out with my F11.

This the first time i've used a strobe with this camera and normally I only use the camera with manaual white balance.

To start, i've left the camera on automatic with the flash on. (i'm covered the internal flash with gaffer tape so the light doesn't get through.) I've found i'm getting good results from Macro shots, but shooting fish and sharks...I'm still getting back scatter and really 'green' shots.

Any suggestion with using this strobe with a compact digital?

A wide angle Inon lens or similar will do wonders by allowing you to actually get within strobe range.

Formula:

Distance to subject = f stop / GN (strobes underwater guide number)

Example:

DTS = f4 / 20

DTS = 5 feet

You are to far away, that is why your photos are green. By not educating consumers to the reason they actually need wide angle lenses they sell a bunch of people cameras who then produce a bunch of washed out blue green photos.

N

Reg
05-09-2009, 05:02
Reg,

I was interested in seeing your improved images but your attachments are missing.
Thanks for your comments. Through trial and error, things have improved. See Attached.

Here they are. I'm finding Macro and close shots a lot easier. I've learned that getting as close as possible gives the best results. Except if its a photo weedy then you can sometimes end up cropping his tail out of the picture.

gee
05-09-2009, 10:33
Thanks for reposting. I agree, there is a big improvement in your photos. Nice sea dragon!

Reg,

I was interested in seeing your improved images but your attachments are missing.
Thanks for your comments. Through trial and error, things have improved. See Attached.

Here they are. I'm finding Macro and close shots a lot easier. I've learned that getting as close as possible gives the best results. Except if its a photo weedy then you can sometimes end up cropping his tail out of the picture.

CompuDude
05-10-2009, 00:13
Nice shots!

Two tips good for anyone shooting underwater, but perhaps particularly germane to this discussion:

1) Get close. Then get closer. Especially for things that don't swim away, you should really get as close as possible.

2) When at all possible (obviously you can't touch coral or do anything that could hurt anything living), brace your camera (or more likely, YOU) against something to be as still as possible when shooting. I try to put two elbows down where possible, or at least one fist to use as a makeshift tripod. A rock solid still camera, especially for fine macro work, really brings out the detail.

jugglematt
05-10-2009, 01:21
Yeah What Compudude said.
good rule of thumb i use , if you cant reach out and touch the subject

you cant light it . so Get closer and fill the frame with the subject .

i would tape over the flash window on the front of your housing,, insert your fibre optic cable under this tape to fire the strobe , this will help to reduce backscatter.
some nice shots

Regards
Matty