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chet
04-20-2009, 21:08
Occasionally I over exert myself at work or diving... and I suffer from mild asthma. I was diving the other day and felt a mild attack coming on at 30' so I surfaced and swam to shore..took off my gear , went up to my vehicle and got my ventolin puffer to relive the congestion. By the time I was able to relieve the asthma symptoms I was very exhausted. If I could have kept the puffer in my BCD I could have just surfaced..used the puffer, waited a few minutes and perhaps continued to dive. Even if it is not possible to continue a dive it would have been much better if I had the ventolin puffer to use as soon as I surfaced. Does anyone know how to carry this product in a Bcd up to a depth of perhaps 50- 100'? The puffer is under pressure(like an aerosol can) I would need something to keep it dry and at surface pressure even at depths. Is there a cannister or something on the market that I could put it in to accomplish this so that I can keep it on my person for emergencies? I would greatly appreciate any in put from somebody that has this problem and has found a way to deal with it. Bye the way....This was the first time this has happened to me in over 35 dives (this type of asthma does not happen very often) but when it does it would be nice to have my puffer with me. The doctors refer to it as SPORT ASTHMA (type of asthma that occurs under over exertion) Has anyone ever used an inhaler while underwater?

Lulubelle
04-20-2009, 21:37
I'm sorry I do not know of any suitable containers.

But I am concerned that anyone who would need "rescue" inhalers during a dive is diving at all. I hear you when you say that in 35 dives you have not needed a rescue inhaler, but you needed it on this dive. What happens if you have a more serious attack when you are underwater?

Do take a look at the DAN guidelines for diving with asthma and consult a suitable physician. It may be that you are guided to take your rescue inhaler prior to diving, or that you are cautioned not to dive until you no longer require such medication. Without looking at you and your pulmonary function under exertion, it is hard to say.

I do understand that it is only active when you are under exertion, but diving can be one of those times. In the meantime, I would indeed caution you to stay shallow enough that you can do a CESA without high likelihood of harm.

chet
04-20-2009, 22:00
this is a very mild form of asthma or ..you're right ...I wouldn't be diving at all!! My doctor is very aware of the situation and he is a diver as well...I get plenty of warning time with out it being anywhere near life threatening It's more of an annoyance than anything. I just wish there was a way of carrying the inhaler on my person so that if I need it I can use it when I surface rather than making my way all the way back to my vehicle to get it!! I do however thank you very much for your concerns..and yes maybe I should take it before diving...I am going to see my doctor again on Wednesday this week to question him on this...

MxDiver
04-20-2009, 22:04
This container may work:
OMS Water Proof Canister reviews and discounts, OMS (http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=OMS_Water_Proof_Canister)

Lulubelle
04-20-2009, 22:05
this is a very mild form of asthma or ..you're right ...I wouldn't be diving at all!! My doctor is very aware of the situation and he is a diver as well...I get plenty of warning time with out it being anywhere near life threatening It's more of an annoyance than anything. I just wish there was a way of carrying the inhaler on my person so that if I need it I can use it when I surface rather than making my way all the way back to my vehicle to get it!!

I'm happy to hear that your doc knows you are diving and is giving you advice. Whew!

Couldn't you float it at the surface in something waterproof? Something tells me you will not be able to find a pressurized container that will work. Alternatively, why not take a puff before you go? Might increase your heart rate/breathing rate/SAC rate, the beta agonists like this do, but better than having to make an emergency ascent.

chet
04-20-2009, 23:26
This container may work:
OMS Water Proof Canister reviews and discounts, OMS (http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=OMS_Water_Proof_Canister)
unfortunately one of the cannisters is slightly too small and the other one is far too big...I need one about 4""x1" ...the smaller 5.5" x .83" cannister is about .15" too small in diameter or it would be perfect!!

wgt
04-21-2009, 07:20
See my post at:

http://forum.scubatoys.com/fitness/19899-diving-asthma-2.html



This container may work:
OMS Water Proof Canister reviews and discounts, OMS (http://www.scubatoys.com/store/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=OMS_Water_Proof_Canister)
unfortunately one of the cannisters is slightly too small and the other one is far too big...I need one about 4""x1" ...the smaller 5.5" x .83" cannister is about .15" too small in diameter or it would be perfect!!

Rileybri
04-21-2009, 07:43
I am no going to comment one way or the other on divign with asthma as there has been and will continue to be plenty of that with out my comments. As to the OP's request for a container to keep the inhaler close by in, my first thought was to use a good qualit positive sealing dry bag attached to the flag line. You will have to surface to use the inhaler regardless and that way you are only contending with 1 ATA worth of water and pressure....

TommyB
04-21-2009, 10:57
Occasionally I over exert myself at work or diving... and I suffer from mild asthma. I was diving the other day and felt a mild attack coming on at 30' so I surfaced and swam to shore..took off my gear , went up to my vehicle and got my ventolin puffer to relive the congestion. By the time I was able to relieve the asthma symptoms I was very exhausted.

Might be a good idea to read this
DAN Divers Alert Network : Asthma & Diving (http://www.diversalertnetwork.org/medical/articles/article.asp?articleid=22)

The bronchial narrowing in asthma has two effects: one is to decrease the amount of air that can be moved in and out of the lungs. This can reduce exercise capacity — especially for a diver, who already has reduced breathing capacity due to the external resistance of his breathing apparatus and the increased internal resistance due to higher breathing gas density at depth. Secondly, reduced airway caliber could cause trapping of gas in the lung during ascent. If trapped gas expands at a rate greater than it can be exhaled through the narrowed airways, lung rupture can result, causing arterial gas embolism or pneumothorax (collapsed lung).
Information from the DAN database on divers with asthma suggests that there may be a slight increase in the risk of decompression illness, but there are insufficient numbers as yet to assess the risk accurately.






Perhaps the most liberal guidelines are from the United Kingdom, which states that well-controlled asthmatics may dive — within two guidelines:

provided they have not needed a bronchodilator within 48 hours; and
if they do not have cold-, exercise- or emotion-induced asthma.Obtain additional information from:
UHMS “Are Asthmatics Fit to Dive?” Workshop Report April 1996; UHMS 10531 Metropolitan Ave., Kensington, MD
UK Sports Diving Medical Committee Report 1995 British Sub-Aqua Club (BSAC), Telford’s Quay, Ellesmere Port, South Wirral, Cheshire L65 4FY
South Pacific Undersea Medical Society Workshop Report (SPUMS) 1995; SPUMS c/o Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthestists, 630 Saint Kilda, Melbourne, Victoria 3004 Australia
Global Initiative for Asthma 1995 Report (NIH 95-3659)
From the January/February 1997 issue of Alert Diver.

I found this quote somewhere about this subject on another forum (not my quote, just something I saw. (Don't kill the messenger


If it is cold, stress related, or exercise related asthmatic, then he will be treated as if he were a dead man walking.