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neogeo
04-25-2009, 16:39
Dives were great! Just DW and I... Cant tell you about the others but there were several different OW classes out today.

http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa114/neogeo_14/P4250009.jpg
myself and Dark Wolf

http://i201.photobucket.com/albums/aa114/neogeo_14/P4250010.jpg
Dark Worf, KennyD, medicdiver, and myself

plot
04-25-2009, 18:37
looks like a good time. havnt been around lately cause of work and other things, after next month i should be ready to go again though :D

Dark Wolf
04-25-2009, 19:38
Thanks for posting pics, neo. Had two good dives today. First dive was 99' for me with a run time of about 24 minutes. Vis was 10-15', temp was about 52. Second dive was 100' for me and a run time of about 29 minutes. Vis was 5-7, temp was 52. I think neo beat me by a few feet on each dive. Two BIG classes had the vis a little stirred up, but manageable. Both dives were very nice, both to the Cabin Cruiser. Was nice to catch up with some friends after being out of the water for so long! Neo, thanks for posting the pics......

DW

texdiveguy
04-25-2009, 19:47
Thanks for the snaps,,,I noted you run your DS inflator hose under your R arm.

neogeo
04-25-2009, 20:25
Yes I run it under my right arm I have my inflator, my spg, and secondary on the left post. So on the right I run my primary and ds I have mant more additions to make to my rig. But I am sitting break tired as ever! Can't wait to dive tomorrow!

texdiveguy
04-25-2009, 21:43
Yes I run it under my right arm I have my inflator, my spg, and secondary on the left post. So on the right I run my primary and ds

Note the differences as listed, this is the more common configuration for doubles. Just thought I would provide this as a guide. Keep up the diving!! :)

Right post (as you wear them).........
Longhose
Wing inflator

Left post (as you wear them)..........
Pressure gauge
Backup reg
Optionally drysuit

plot
04-25-2009, 21:54
also, if you're wearing split fins, make sure your left fin is on your left foot, and your right one on your right foot. makes a big difference, otherwise you lose alot of power. common mistake i see all the time... like people dont even know they go on certain feet.

















;) :D

Splitlip
04-25-2009, 22:03
Yes I run it under my right arm I have my inflator, my spg, and secondary on the left post. So on the right I run my primary and ds

Note the differences as listed, this is the more common configuration for doubles. Just thought I would provide this as a guide. Keep up the diving!! :)

Right post (as you wear them).........
Longhose
Wing inflator

Left post (as you wear them)..........
Pressure gauge
Backup reg
Optionally drysuit
Hi Tex!

Glad to see you back with both feet!:smiley20:

I've come to find that Neo marches to the beat of a different drummer. He may yet re-invent the wheel. :)

Hope all is well.

Tim

texdiveguy
04-25-2009, 22:19
Yes I run it under my right arm I have my inflator, my spg, and secondary on the left post. So on the right I run my primary and ds

Note the differences as listed, this is the more common configuration for doubles. Just thought I would provide this as a guide. Keep up the diving!! :)

Right post (as you wear them).........
Longhose
Wing inflator

Left post (as you wear them)..........
Pressure gauge
Backup reg
Optionally drysuit
Hi Tex!

Glad to see you back with both feet!:smiley20:

I've come to find that Neo marches to the beat of a different drummer. He may yet re-invent the wheel. :)

Hope all is well.

Tim

THANKS Tim for the kind thoughts! I am up and moving and gaining endurance, yet to be released for diving, just have to be patient....and to be honest I am yet to that point.

Yea just noticed this on Neo's photo and was curious......he may yet re-invent the wheel---I love that. :)

Hope all is well for you and your's these spring days....hope your diving is going great and fun!! Best to you always.

Alan

neogeo
04-25-2009, 22:22
Thanks for the advice tex... As I said I have many more changes to make. I'm thinking I'm going to buy a 6cuft tank or a 13 for drysuit inflation on my next check.

navyhmc
04-26-2009, 06:40
I'd recommend the 13 cu ft. Not too much bigger than a 6 and you get more dives out of a fill. (I know; says the guy without a dry suit. :smiley36: )

texdiveguy
04-26-2009, 09:00
I'd recommend the 13 cu ft. Not too much bigger than a 6 and you get more dives out of a fill. (I know; says the guy without a dry suit. :smiley36: )

I too use a 13cf cylinder for my ds.

plot
04-26-2009, 09:40
i think you should go with twin 3cu's

Rileybri
04-26-2009, 09:46
i think you should go with twin 3cu's

now would you have them on an isolator manifold or rigged for independent twins?

plot
04-26-2009, 09:50
i wouldnt even do an isolator manifold, just a straight manifold. :)

Dark Wolf
04-26-2009, 20:06
How about side mount? :)

DW

KennyD
04-26-2009, 20:16
Neo is something like 22yrs. old.....Think back when we were that age and how our track of mind was and what we thought when other people gave us advice. He is a good kid and with alot more time in the water and around good divers he will eventually drink the Kool Aid and go DIR I'm sure... I was talking to him alot and doing my "Jedi Mind Tricks"..
Good to meet you Neo!

Dark Wolf
04-26-2009, 21:15
Neo is something like 22yrs. old.....Think back when we were that age and how our track of mind was and what we thought when other people gave us advice. He is a good kid and with alot more time in the water and around good divers he will eventually drink the Kool Aid and go DIR I'm sure... I was talking to him alot and doing my "Jedi Mind Tricks"..
Good to meet you Neo!

Very well said, Kenny and I agree completely. "Jedi Mind Tricks"? Is THAT what you were doing?! :)

Was good to see you all this weekend. Wish we could have got a dive or two in, Kenny. Maybe next time. Thanks to you all....

DW

neogeo
04-27-2009, 02:24
I was great to meet you as well Kenny. hmmm idk about the mind tricks... Too bad I didn't have the camera out when you did your little ballerina pose in your boxers out side the dressing room. You can ask DW I am open to advice if its given in the proper manner...

Wow never thought about double 3's before lol nice on plot you do it first

KennyD
04-27-2009, 07:04
I was great to meet you as well Kenny. hmmm idk about the mind tricks... Too bad I didn't have the camera out when you did your little ballerina pose in your boxers out side the dressing room. You can ask DW I am open to advice if its given in the proper manner...

Wow never thought about double 3's before lol nice on plot you do it first

DINS= Doing It Neo Style...Alot of people have forgot why they started Diving. Your having fun and not doing anything to put yourself or anybody else in harms way. Keep diving with the people you trust and the rest will follow.
I'm out for a month or so.. I've got a perforated eardrum and need to let it heal up.

neogeo
04-27-2009, 12:12
Thanks Kenny hope that ear heals quickly. Maybe ill get a dive in with you one of these days!

bennerman
04-27-2009, 18:32
Neo is something like 22yrs. old.....Think back when we were that age and how our track of mind was and what we thought when other people gave us advice. He is a good kid and with alot more time in the water and around good divers he will eventually drink the Kool Aid and go DIR I'm sure... I was talking to him alot and doing my "Jedi Mind Tricks"..
Good to meet you Neo!

*Waves hand*
You don't think there is anything wrong with kool-aid. You will send me 500 dollars... and some liquor

Brandon Belew
04-27-2009, 21:49
DW - funny you should mention two classes having the vis stirred up :P - during one 'tour' back to the entry area I noticed about 3 or 4 guys in doubles playing in the silt right to the east of the training platforms ;)

I can assure you the students behind me didn't stir that up - they were 5+ off the bottom. hah

Dark Wolf
04-28-2009, 05:38
5 feet off the bottom and a good flutter kick can still stir things up. :)

DW

Brandon Belew
04-28-2009, 08:24
5 feet off the bottom and a good flutter kick can still stir things up. :)

DW

Not as bad as 3-4 guys digging for treasure in 4ft of silt :smiley36:

neogeo
04-28-2009, 14:20
5 feet off the bottom and a good flutter kick can still stir things up. :)

DW

Not as bad as 3-4 guys digging for treasure in 4ft of silt :smiley36:


IDK viz was alright then a group came down the and it turned to silt real quick... there were 3 guys in doubles DW, KennyD, and I. I was 5-6 feet from the bottom frog kicking. Kenny was going in and out of the air cavern. DW was staying stationary in the same place. Its okay to admit that 15 OW students siltled the place up.... Kenny was even saying he got flutter kicked in the face a few times....

plot
04-28-2009, 21:18
i told you not to kick kenny in the face neo...


when me and BB did our dive, i plowed that quarry like it was a one night stand with jessica alba.

neogeo
04-28-2009, 21:21
haha no no it wasn't I who kicked him lol

i was wondering why the dive was only 2 minutes...

plot
04-28-2009, 22:16
it only lasted that long because i spent 30 seconds wondering where you went...

neogeo
04-28-2009, 23:02
Sorry I didnt have 120's on to make me sink like a rock! I had those al72's on lol I guess I owe you 30 seconds with Jessica Alba

cummings66
04-29-2009, 10:39
30 seconds, get real. I couldn't finish slobbering in that length of time. You got to give a guy a fighting chance before you offer that.

So how many dives do you have on your doubles now neogeo? I saw you post about the double HP100's, they'd go real sweet on you. What you saw me wear at Oronogo was the PST double HP100's, so it'd be the same setup.

medicdiver
04-29-2009, 10:58
I didn't think the viz was that bad at 170' but it was dark and cold.

neogeo
04-29-2009, 13:26
6 dives on the lp108's.
Yeah I am looking at some 100's, 104's and 108's...

plot
04-29-2009, 17:00
who's tanks are you currently diving?

neogeo
04-29-2009, 17:06
who's tanks are you currently diving?

Renting from John... but looking to buy a set of 104's very soon

Splitlip
04-29-2009, 20:30
who's tanks are you currently diving?

Renting from John... but looking to buy a set of 104's very soon

Just a warm water diver here, but curious.

I see by your profile you are a new diver. I also saw in another thread you are looking forward to your AOW and deep dives.
Mightn't doubles at this stage of your diving career be a bit much? Task over loading may be a consideration.

As I said, I am a Blue water diver and most here hold off on doubles until they have had some tech training.

neogeo
04-29-2009, 21:17
who's tanks are you currently diving?

Renting from John... but looking to buy a set of 104's very soon

Just a warm water diver here, but curious.

I see by your profile you are a new diver. I also saw in another thread you are looking forward to your AOW and deep dives.
Mightn't doubles at this stage of your diving career be a bit much? Task over loading may be a consideration.

As I said, I am a Blue water diver and most here hold off on doubles until they have had some tech training.

I see what your saying but I think I am moving at a safe and comfortable level for me. My first few dives it was a bit of over tasking but not bad. I'm taking proper instruction from highly qualified instructors. Yes I am taking my PADI AOW and PADI Deep Diver courses.

cummings66
04-30-2009, 07:08
There isn't many around here that dive doubles, but a few of us do. Mostly it seems that the ones that do are getting ready for a technical course. I think any diver can master them given proper instruction. When you think of it, outside of the valve drills they're not a lot different. They'll flip you over faster, make the buoyancy control more difficult because you have to think in advance of what you want to do, but in the end they're really not that hard to master. Of course you have steel vs al, drysuit vs wetsuit and which goes with what, lift bags as well.

neogeo is diving with some good buddies so they'll watch over him as well and other than being young and full of vigor he's got natural talent on his side. His buddies down there are taking care of him I'm sure, and if you knew John you'd know he's got an eye out too.

For most people though, doubles can be a big handful to tackle when they're new to the sport.

Splitlip
04-30-2009, 17:58
When you think of it, outside of the valve drills they're not a lot different. They'll flip you over faster, make the buoyancy control more difficult because you have to think in advance of what you want to do..For most people though, doubles can be a big handful to tackle when they're new to the sport.

LOL. Is that all?

Seriously, though, I'm glad he has a mentor.

We lost a new diver a while back who tackled doubles without experience or training. He had the valve on the manifold shut. SPG was reading 3000 psi off the full cylinder and primary was on the empty cylinder as was his inflator.

Dark Wolf
04-30-2009, 20:25
When you think of it, outside of the valve drills they're not a lot different. They'll flip you over faster, make the buoyancy control more difficult because you have to think in advance of what you want to do..For most people though, doubles can be a big handful to tackle when they're new to the sport.

LOL. Is that all?

Seriously, though, I'm glad he has a mentor.

We lost a new diver a while back who tackled doubles without experience or training. He had the valve on the manifold shut. SPG was reading 3000 psi off the full cylinder and primary was on the empty cylinder as was his inflator.

There are so many things here that I could say, and perhaps I should just pass on saying them. Sounds to me like the problem was not a new diver tackling doubles. There is a huge difference between a new diver deciding to switch to doubles, and a new diver who spends time and money on gear, and talking and learning all the why's and where-for's. Neo has done a great job in his transition to doubles. He has also spent a lot of time talking with Tec divers and Tec instructors with many years of experience.

DW

plot
04-30-2009, 21:41
When you think of it, outside of the valve drills they're not a lot different. They'll flip you over faster, make the buoyancy control more difficult because you have to think in advance of what you want to do..For most people though, doubles can be a big handful to tackle when they're new to the sport.

LOL. Is that all?

Seriously, though, I'm glad he has a mentor.

We lost a new diver a while back who tackled doubles without experience or training. He had the valve on the manifold shut. SPG was reading 3000 psi off the full cylinder and primary was on the empty cylinder as was his inflator.

his octo should've been on the other cylinder, he should've had two forms of bouyancy (ie: drysuit or liftbag), and more importantly... he should've known if his guage isn't going down, something is wrong... he didn't grow gills all of a sudden.

the first two are forgivable as a mentor or instructor is needed to really know how to rig it and what you need extra on you. the last one though, isn't. i don't get why people think their SAC rate will magically improve 10 fold between dives...

DW helped me get started with them... neo's in good hands.

Splitlip
04-30-2009, 21:50
When you think of it, outside of the valve drills they're not a lot different. They'll flip you over faster, make the buoyancy control more difficult because you have to think in advance of what you want to do..For most people though, doubles can be a big handful to tackle when they're new to the sport.

LOL. Is that all?

Seriously, though, I'm glad he has a mentor.

We lost a new diver a while back who tackled doubles without experience or training. He had the valve on the manifold shut. SPG was reading 3000 psi off the full cylinder and primary was on the empty cylinder as was his inflator.

There are so many things here that I could say, and perhaps I should just pass on saying them. Sounds to me like the problem was not a new diver tackling doubles. There is a huge difference between a new diver deciding to switch to doubles, and a new diver who spends time and money on gear, and talking and learning all the why's and where-for's. Neo has done a great job in his transition to doubles. He has also spent a lot of time talking with Tec divers and Tec instructors with many years of experience.

DW

Your point being.....?

The diver who died owned his rig. And in truth was relatively experienced.

I have something like a thousand dives and I get heads down with cave divers everyday (I work with one). Will I enter a cave without training? No. Plenty of links here on this forum about "qualified" divers who have died by going beyond their skill level without training.

I have checked out in a 152. I don't expect I can fly an A-6, F-4 or 767 even though my friends fly or have flown them and I have spent many hours talking to them about the aircraft.

Not trying to start a war, but I don't want to see the kid as a statistic. I've seen pictures of his rig and have read some of his posts from which I infered he is going to "do it his way".

Please amplify your response.

plot
04-30-2009, 22:15
he also does all his dives with DW or someone that DOES have alot of experience in doubles, so if he does have some failure, he'll have someone closeby to bail him out. best way to practice is with a competent trusted diver next to you.

neo's got a cool head, he can handle it. i've dove with plenty of people and after one dive you can always tell which ones were made for it and which ones you gotta really keep an eye on... there's people that will deal with what comes there way, and people that are easily panic'd.

with experience, he should've known how much air he normally breaths. like i already stated, there's no excuse for checking your guage and thinking that you're using zero air.

also, i think a more proper analogy would be, i can drive a stickshift car, and my friends have talked to me alot on how to drive a semi. i'm pretty sure i could jump in and get it rolling, and after a few miles be moving along just fine. especially when one of those friends is in the passenger seat.

Dark Wolf
04-30-2009, 22:21
When you think of it, outside of the valve drills they're not a lot different. They'll flip you over faster, make the buoyancy control more difficult because you have to think in advance of what you want to do..For most people though, doubles can be a big handful to tackle when they're new to the sport.

LOL. Is that all?

Seriously, though, I'm glad he has a mentor.

We lost a new diver a while back who tackled doubles without experience or training. He had the valve on the manifold shut. SPG was reading 3000 psi off the full cylinder and primary was on the empty cylinder as was his inflator.

There are so many things here that I could say, and perhaps I should just pass on saying them. Sounds to me like the problem was not a new diver tackling doubles. There is a huge difference between a new diver deciding to switch to doubles, and a new diver who spends time and money on gear, and talking and learning all the why's and where-for's. Neo has done a great job in his transition to doubles. He has also spent a lot of time talking with Tec divers and Tec instructors with many years of experience.

DW

Your point being.....?

The diver who died owned his rig. And in truth was relatively experienced.

I have something like a thousand dives and I get heads down with cave divers everyday (I work with one). Will I enter a cave without training? No. Plenty of links here on this forum about "qualified" divers who have died by going beyond their skill level without training.

I have checked out in a 152. I don't expect I can fly an A-6, F-4 or 767 even though my friends fly or have flown them and I have spent many hours talking to them about the aircraft.

Not trying to start a war, but I don't want to see the kid as a statistic. I've seen pictures of his rig and have read some of his posts from which I infered he is going to "do it his way".

Please amplify your response.

Ok, you start out by saying that this was a new and inexperienced diver. Then you say that actually the diver was experienced and owned his own gear. I am sensing something here. After looking through your posts in the DDCN, it appears that a lot of your posts are nothing more than looking to stir things up.

Basically, if the diver was experienced he would have known to go to his reg that was hanging around his neck. After switching to the secondary, he should have checked the isolator. Now really, how experienced was this diver. We have already had two different responses from you on this. Just wondering what the real story is.......

DW

cummings66
05-01-2009, 06:56
his octo should've been on the other cylinder, he should've had two forms of bouyancy (ie: drysuit or liftbag), and more importantly... he should've known if his guage isn't going down, something is wrong... he didn't grow gills all of a sudden.


He was rigged correctly, the longhose and BC inflator were on the right post with the left one having the backup regulator, spg, and drysuit if you use it. His failure was to not check his backup as I think you might be saying because that would have supplied air, or more accurately his failure was his buddy who wasn't there for him. If you lose your right post in a wetsuit you need to be capable of swimming it up or you need to use your lift bag. I wonder if he had a lift bag? I assume he was in a wetsuit because it was in Florida, as far as I know unless you're in a spring the temps are never what I would call drysuit temps. But we dive cold water year round, half of it in a wetsuit. My tech instructor told me, with doubles you have at least a 60lb lift bag, drysuit, and bc. Always 3 forms of lift, without fail.

But with doubles you always separate the regulators and inflators, never have all your eggs in one basket. However, there is more risk to doubles because this is an example of what can happen if you're not familiar enough with valve drills, or worse yet can't do them.

My procedure is to always do a valve drill, every single dive I do I run through at least one, sometimes two depending on the dive. I do it to stay in touch with it and keep at the speed. I practice the emergency skills like my life depends on it, because it may.

Splitlip
05-01-2009, 17:08
When you think of it, outside of the valve drills they're not a lot different. They'll flip you over faster, make the buoyancy control more difficult because you have to think in advance of what you want to do..For most people though, doubles can be a big handful to tackle when they're new to the sport.

LOL. Is that all?

Seriously, though, I'm glad he has a mentor.

We lost a new diver a while back who tackled doubles without experience or training. He had the valve on the manifold shut. SPG was reading 3000 psi off the full cylinder and primary was on the empty cylinder as was his inflator.

There are so many things here that I could say, and perhaps I should just pass on saying them. Sounds to me like the problem was not a new diver tackling doubles. There is a huge difference between a new diver deciding to switch to doubles, and a new diver who spends time and money on gear, and talking and learning all the why's and where-for's. Neo has done a great job in his transition to doubles. He has also spent a lot of time talking with Tec divers and Tec instructors with many years of experience.

DW

Your point being.....?

The diver who died owned his rig. And in truth was relatively experienced.

I have something like a thousand dives and I get heads down with cave divers everyday (I work with one). Will I enter a cave without training? No. Plenty of links here on this forum about "qualified" divers who have died by going beyond their skill level without training.

I have checked out in a 152. I don't expect I can fly an A-6, F-4 or 767 even though my friends fly or have flown them and I have spent many hours talking to them about the aircraft.

Not trying to start a war, but I don't want to see the kid as a statistic. I've seen pictures of his rig and have read some of his posts from which I infered he is going to "do it his way".

Please amplify your response.

Ok, you start out by saying that this was a new and inexperienced diver. Then you say that actually the diver was experienced and owned his own gear. I am sensing something here. After looking through your posts in the DDCN, it appears that a lot of your posts are nothing more than looking to stir things up.

Basically, if the diver was experienced he would have known to go to his reg that was hanging around his neck. After switching to the secondary, he should have checked the isolator. Now really, how experienced was this diver. We have already had two different responses from you on this. Just wondering what the real story is.......

DW

No, I said "new" diver. By my standards the dead diver was. And compared to Neo's experience, the guy was a "relatively" experienced diver.
And yes, experienced divers die pushing the envelope. And less experienced divers IMO are just as likely (if not more) to experience catastrophe.

As for stirring things up in DDCN, you are incorrect. I love these guys and one of them I count as a friend. I have a lot of respect for them too as divers. Unless it is my stick "phobia" of which you're speaking, LOL.

DW, I have heard from two DDCN divers who were happy I made the post as they honestly worry that Neo is going too far too fast. No, I won't say who as they have chosen not to post here.

I have no hidden agenda. I did not flame him. I only made informative posts with what I know to be valuable information. This is a discussion forum.

Peace.

plot
05-01-2009, 17:27
he switched to a drysuit out of neccessity of where he dives.

switching to doubles, imo, isn't moving to far to fast. not sure what more he is pushing.

Dark Wolf
05-01-2009, 17:34
That is just it, plot. He is NOT pushing anything. Unless you consider "Pushing it" hitting the water every chance you get and upgrading gear to accommodate the diving that he will be doing in the future instead of buying gear two or three times. Yes, he wants to advance but is taking the proper approach to do so.

I really am not concerned with who said what. As I said in an earlier post, he is talking and training with some very respected Tec divers and instructors.

DW

Splitlip
05-01-2009, 17:46
Training is the key. 'nuff said.

Brandon Belew
05-01-2009, 22:54
I had not a single problem strapping on a set of doubles.

navyhmc
05-02-2009, 07:56
I had not a single problem strapping on a set of doubles.

Yes, but have you had a single problem walking up the hill with doubles? :smiley36:

Brandon Belew
05-02-2009, 20:47
I had not a single problem strapping on a set of doubles.

Yes, but have you had a single problem walking up the hill with doubles? :smiley36:

Not due to doubles. Due to me being a fat ****

navyhmc
05-03-2009, 12:29
I had not a single problem strapping on a set of doubles.

Yes, but have you had a single problem walking up the hill with doubles? :smiley36:

Not due to doubles. Due to me being a fat ****


:smilie39:I wasn't going to go there. :smiley36:

When is the Mrs. going to start diving with us? Are you ashamed of us?:smiley36:

Brandon Belew
05-03-2009, 14:50
I had not a single problem strapping on a set of doubles.

Yes, but have you had a single problem walking up the hill with doubles? :smiley36:

Not due to doubles. Due to me being a fat ****


:smilie39:I wasn't going to go there. :smiley36:

When is the Mrs. going to start diving with us? Are you ashamed of us?:smiley36:

She's afraid of lakes. She never finished her PADI OW course. If she would have she would never dive where we dive anyways. She'd dive in hawaii later this month and then probably never again.

plot
05-03-2009, 21:22
my only real issue with doubles has been the fact that they weigh as much as me.

neogeo
05-07-2009, 21:19
my only real issue with doubles has been the fact that they weigh as much as me.

an al80 weighs as much as you do! but seriously how much do those tanks effect your gas milage in that little neon