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Chilkie
06-03-2009, 15:23
I see all of these painted aluminum tanks in shiny bright colors and I was wondering if there is any particular method for painting a tank if I bought one and decided to "jazz it up" a bit?
It seem to me that chipping and flaking off of aluminum would be really problematic. Any ideas, tips or general knowledge you folks care to pass along? Thanks!

bennerman
06-03-2009, 15:45
Without any knowledge of the subject, I would say car paint would be your best bet. House paint and painter's paint would just wash off. Of course, this is simply a guess, I wouldn't trust me if I were you trusting me :)

mike_s
06-03-2009, 16:34
several threads on Scubaboard about people that have painted tanks, what to do, what kind of paint to use, issues, etc....

do a search over there....

UCFKnightDiver
06-03-2009, 17:15
whatever you do dont use heat to bake/cure the paint, personally I would rather strip the tank and just have the silver aluminum, luxfer I know recommends a particular paint stripper on their website

cummings66
06-03-2009, 17:58
Also keep your dive shop informed, many shops won't do a VIS or fill painted cylinders unless they know it's been done safely. That means, get a copy of Luxfers specs they have on their site and share it, have a bill of materials and do it as described.

ReefHound
06-03-2009, 18:45
Without any knowledge of the subject, I would say car paint would be your best bet. House paint and painter's paint would just wash off. Of course, this is simply a guess, I wouldn't trust me if I were you trusting me :)

Isn't car paint usually baked on?

chilly willy
06-03-2009, 18:51
Personally I prefer non painted tanks. As previously stated, you might have trouble getting the tank tested if its been painted, not to mention that it can hide corrosion and flaws from view.

in_cavediver
06-03-2009, 21:42
Personally - I don't like re-painted tanks. Its a red flag to most tank inspectors and unless they personally know the history, they may not want to sign off on it. As for the case of your local shop knowing, what happens when you move or want to sell it? I personally steer clear of re-painted tanks - too many unknowns and not worth the risks.

With that, I ask the question of why? I understand steels needing this at times (cold galavining paint is the way to go there) but Al tanks don't need paint. Why complicate your life later?

bennerman
06-03-2009, 21:55
Perhaps a decal if you are looking for a specific design? I am sure you can find a place that makes custom decals

ReefHound
06-03-2009, 22:06
Check out Scuba Hides (http://www.scubahides.com/) if you are looking for a tank decal to dress it up.

mike_s
06-04-2009, 11:17
Without any knowledge of the subject, I would say car paint would be your best bet. House paint and painter's paint would just wash off. Of course, this is simply a guess, I wouldn't trust me if I were you trusting me :)

Isn't car paint usually baked on?


maybe at the factory, when they paint it as parts...

but I would think that although most paint shops have "paint booths", I doubt there are that many with "drive in ovens". That and I imagine that all the rubber hoses and tires wouldn't fare that well from being baked. :smiley2:

Chilkie
06-04-2009, 14:46
No real reason. I was just curious about the process because I see the colorful ones around. I am going to buy a tank and was just trying to figure out what could be done to personalize it a little bit. After doing a bunch of reading I think I'll purchase new anyway. I'm more comfortable with a new tank than a pre owned one.
I just purchased a custom colored Zeagle Ranger so why stop there? :smiley2:







Personally - I don't like re-painted tanks. Its a red flag to most tank inspectors and unless they personally know the history, they may not want to sign off on it. As for the case of your local shop knowing, what happens when you move or want to sell it? I personally steer clear of re-painted tanks - too many unknowns and not worth the risks.

With that, I ask the question of why? I understand steels needing this at times (cold galavining paint is the way to go there) but Al tanks don't need paint. Why complicate your life later?

bennerman
06-04-2009, 14:53
I plan to decal my first tank with several mythologic water beasts. The first of which is my avatar

fire diver
06-04-2009, 15:33
I'm sorry, but I see those pretty, candy-colored tanks as signs of novice or once a year divers. Tanks get beat up, scrathed, nicked etc every time they they are used. A gnarly tank is a badge of honor (or a cheap ebay sale LOL).

bennerman
06-04-2009, 15:50
is midgardsormr a sign of a noob? He will kill you

Chilkie
06-04-2009, 15:58
If I'm buying a new one anyway it might as well look good when I pick it up even if it won't look good after the first trip out.....






I'm sorry, but I see those pretty, candy-colored tanks as signs of novice or once a year divers. Tanks get beat up, scrathed, nicked etc every time they they are used. A gnarly tank is a badge of honor (or a cheap ebay sale LOL).

FroggDVR
06-05-2009, 11:30
Paint away.
Who really cares if someone thinks you are a newb diver. ARE YOU??? Why should it matter. Dress in all black if you want.
People look at me strange when I show up in my oms gear and everyone dives dive right or halcyon. Jump in the water and show em what ya got.

Tooooo many people are pushed into doing one thing or another because they think what other people think matters..

As for painting cylinders. I have done many. All my Alums are painted Yamaha blue. The same that is on my sleds.

USE NO HEAT TO CURE!!!!! If you have a paint that needs to cure sun light is the old fashoned way of doing it Still works today.
Look for appliance paint. Very tough paint. Resists chips and scratches and does not need heat to cure.

If you have a favorite LDS let them know what you are doing so when it comes time for a vis they do not reject the tank because it has some paint on it

Do not apply the paint so thick that the DOT#'s and serial # is covered. That goes for the Hydro stamp also.

Have fun with em.

diverdan_51
06-05-2009, 12:14
I think the factory finish on most tanks is actually a powder coating vs. paint.

Chilke, what is the "S" logo on your BC? Is it for a college team? If so, you might want to check out ebay and do a "football helmet decal" search there. You can find the helmet decals of many college teams. Football helmet decals are tough as nails and would stick well to a tank.

cummings66
06-05-2009, 17:49
Different powder materials require different cure temperatures, commonly in a range between 350 F and 400 F and if you hit those temps the cylinder is scrap metal. So, it's not powder coating on AL cylinders as we're discussing here. If a shop ever saw one that was they would not fill it.

Zeagle Eagle
06-07-2009, 12:45
I see all of these painted aluminum tanks in shiny bright colors and I was wondering if there is any particular method for painting a tank if I bought one and decided to "jazz it up" a bit?
It seem to me that chipping and flaking off of aluminum would be really problematic. Any ideas, tips or general knowledge you folks care to pass along? Thanks!
I bought 3 used tanks from my local LDS and painted one for my fiance. My local LDS will not fill it now because it is painted. The other two had "scuba hides" on them and I have to take them off to get them filled.

UCFKnightDiver
06-08-2009, 08:16
I see all of these painted aluminum tanks in shiny bright colors and I was wondering if there is any particular method for painting a tank if I bought one and decided to "jazz it up" a bit?
It seem to me that chipping and flaking off of aluminum would be really problematic. Any ideas, tips or general knowledge you folks care to pass along? Thanks!
I bought 3 used tanks from my local LDS and painted one for my fiance. My local LDS will not fill it now because it is painted. The other two had "scuba hides" on them and I have to take them off to get them filled.

as long as you know you didnt heat that one tank and its aluminum I would just strip the paint the lds shouldnt know the difference, if its steel strip it and cold galvanize it

cummings66
06-08-2009, 17:42
I'd strip the paint, go into the dive shop with Luxfer's guide on cylinders and how to paint them and paint it with them present. Then there's no argument. One other possibility, you obscured the numbers on the cylinder. Do that and it's an automatic failure.

Chilkie
06-09-2009, 10:30
I asked my local LDS and they said that they would have no problem filling a tank if I painted it provided that they were able to Hydro and VIS it prior to my going ahead with painting it. They want to make sure that they can see the markings prior clearly just in case it is more difficult to do so following.
I guess it is another reason to have a good relationship with an LDS.





I see all of these painted aluminum tanks in shiny bright colors and I was wondering if there is any particular method for painting a tank if I bought one and decided to "jazz it up" a bit?
It seem to me that chipping and flaking off of aluminum would be really problematic. Any ideas, tips or general knowledge you folks care to pass along? Thanks!
I bought 3 used tanks from my local LDS and painted one for my fiance. My local LDS will not fill it now because it is painted. The other two had "scuba hides" on them and I have to take them off to get them filled.