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bennerman
06-07-2009, 21:09
Because of a couple learning disorders, I need extra time to learn stuff, so does anyone know a website which would allow me to brush up on some of the basics before I actually take the course. I would go to the dive shop to pick up a manual, but I have yet to raise the course cost and they will most likely expect me to pay for the course first.

fisheater
06-07-2009, 21:28
Which agency are you taking the course through? PADI? NAUI? SSI? Other?

bennerman
06-07-2009, 21:28
Padi, most likely

FishFood
06-07-2009, 21:31
Search the internet for a PADI OW manual and order one (should be cheap off Ebay) Learn the basics and most importantly the math. Make sure you can work all the multidive table calculations. This will make the course much easier.

Also, I take that to mean you aren't OW certified?

bennerman
06-07-2009, 21:32
Not at the present time, no

navyhmc
06-07-2009, 21:34
But make sure you're getting the right manual-some places sell out of date manuals as new. Well, they are new as in never used, but out of date doesn't help you.

chilly willy
06-07-2009, 21:38
Go to PADI.com, there you can get the material in advance of the course. Be sure to take the full course at the LDS and not online e-learning. Nothing can subsitute for a real teaching environment.

mitsuguy
06-07-2009, 22:15
I have had great results from students that have been doing the e-learning... You can have it read to you, or you read yourself... it goes over questions you miss and more...

Or, you can just go buy the book prior to starting the course, tell them you don't want to start the course just yet, maybe even get a copy of the DVD's to watch once or twice...

bennerman
06-07-2009, 22:18
Ah, the dvd, I forgot that that existed... I might have a little luck with a torrent there...

UofTOrange
06-08-2009, 14:25
Ah, the dvd, I forgot that that existed... I might have a little luck with a torrent there...

The DVD I got was basically just the book in a visual form with a few videos, but I did think it was a lot better than the book itself

fisheater
06-08-2009, 15:13
I was impressed with and learned a lot from the PADI OW DVD. The imbedded videos and the quizes helped reenforce the academics.

reactive
06-08-2009, 16:50
Most places will allow you to purchase just the book/kit without paying for the entire course. I wouldn't hurt to call your LDS and ask if they'll sell it to you seperately and put the cost towards your future class.
My LDS did this for me when I took my Nitrox class.

bennerman
06-08-2009, 22:27
Having watched part one of the dvd (part 2 is still downloading), here are my notes so far, can anyone tell me if I have anything incorrect, and of so, what?

Buoyancy
Buoyancy: Equal to the Weight of the water which the object displaces.
Weighs less than water = Float = Positively buoyant
More than water = Sink = Negatively Buoyant
Equal = Doesn't Move = Neutrally Buoyant


Air Pressure:
On gas:
0m/0ft = 1 bar/atmosphere 100% surface air volume 100% Surface air density
10m/33ft = 2 bar/atmosphere 50% '' 200% ''
20m/66ft = 3 bar/atmosphere 33% '' 300% ''
30m/99ft = 4 bar/atmosphere 25% '' 400% ''


On the Human Body
Equalization:
-Increased Pressure in Ear = Discomfort/Pain/Injury “Squeeze”
-Add air to fix this. “Equalization”
-Plug nose, breathe gently/Wiggle jaw/Swallow
-Equalize frequently
-Surface if completely unable to equalize. Trying too hard can cause injury
-Never Dive with congestion.
-Exhale through nose to equalize mask.


Expansion:
-Exhale regularly, otherwise lung rupture may result. As will an air embolism.
-Reverse Block: Congestion blocks escape of air. Descend a few feet.


Equipment:
Mask:
-Airspace allows you to focus your eyes.
-Non gel toothpaste to remove manufacture chemicals.


Snorkel (useless piece of crap):
-Less waste of air.
-Attach to left side of mask.


Fins:
-Large surface area to propel the diver through the water.


BCD (Buoyancy Control Device):
-Adjust buoyancy by adding/removing air.




Scuba Tank:
-Holds compressed air.
-Aluminium or steel
-Yoke Valve: Hose attaches via yoke system.
-DIN Valve: Screws in.
-O-Ring: Maintains airtight seal.




Regulator:
-Provides air at the ambient pressure.
First Stage:
-Reduces air from tank to intermediate pressure.
Second Stage:
-Reduces air pressure further for safe breathing.
Submersible Pressure Gauge:
-Shows how much air is left
Alternate Air Source:
-Used for sharing air, or when second stage regulator is inoperative.
Low Pressure Inflater:
-Used for inflating the BCD.

mitsuguy
06-08-2009, 22:33
definitely on the right track...

I think I have something that can help even more... PM or e-mail me (mitsuguy@gmail.com) and I'll let ya know...

bennerman
06-08-2009, 22:55
kk, pmed you

Quero
06-09-2009, 07:02
It looks like you are doing very well there, bennerman. Kudos to you for knowing how to work through your challenges to get the results you want. I know what an achievement it is to learn how to manage reading when your brain works differently (one of my sons has a reading issue and learned to deal with it through specific resource training).

I just finished certifying a student who left school when he was 12, so every concept was difficult. He had no understanding of science in any abstract way, for one thing, and for another, his reading skills were/are quite limited. As a result we spent hours on every chapter of the book, even with the help of the video, the video clips on the teaching DVDs, etc. So I suspect that getting through the academics was an even greater challenge for him than it is for you.

I'm also pleased to say, though, that this guy is an absolute FISH in the water. He had nailed buoyancy before we even left the pool to go to open water. I've never seen his equal in the ease he has had in mastering the motor skills needed to dive.

Whenever he would get upset with himself and frustrated at his "slowness" with the learning materials I would remind him that he was stellar in other areas where "smart" people typically struggle in the beginning--in the water.

bennerman
06-09-2009, 16:22
Thanks everyone for your help :). I will post the rest of the stuff "Dat I dun learnded from dat dare Day-Vay-Day" when I have finished my notes.

bennerman
06-09-2009, 17:40
Here is what I have learned so far. Everything else can really be learned on the fly. If a point is listed as needing clarification, please, be nice and help :)

If starred: (*) = Being left handed, should I reverse this?

PS: While my humourous remarks might be distracting, I find they help me learn better, so please, humour my humour :)


Confined Water Dive 1 Skills:
Assembling the Gear:
Adding the Tank to the BCD:


Wet nylon strap.
Slide BCD over the tank.
Adjust tank so valve faces head.
Secure by tightening the band as far as I can. Lock in place with mechanism.
See if band can slide at all. Lift slightly to see if it falls out. Return to Step 3 if so.
Attaching the Regulator:


Remove plastic cap or tape (if applicable).
Check O-ring, see instructor if damaged or missing.
Open tank valve to clean valve opening.
Remove dust cap buy loosening the yoke (Yoke) or unscrewing (DIN).
Place tank between legs for leverage. Put first stage on the tank so that the valve meets the first stage opening. Make sure second stage goes over right* shoulder.
Tighten the yoke (yoke) or screw in (DIN).
Attach the low pressure hose to the low pressure inflator.
Turning on Scuba Unit:


Hold SPG with left* hand facing away from me (in case it explodes!!!)
Open valve slowly. If I hear a small leak, turn off and report to the instructor.
Assuming no leaks, open fully.
Check SPG and compare it to pressure in tank.
Test regulator by purging it. It should start when the button is pressed, and stop when the button is released
Exhale through it. If exhalation is difficult, the exhaust valve may be stuck. Report to instructor.
Assuming all is well, take a breaths from the regulator.


Weight Belt:


Have instructor explain the approximate amount of weight to use.
Distribute weight as evenly as possible.
Adjust to about 15-20cm larger than waist circumference.


Donning the Equipment:
Donning the Wetsuit (Sounds fun...)


Put on wetsuit pants (I thought that they are one piece...).
Struggle with boots. Tuck under pant cuffs.
Put on jacket one arm at a time. Make sure arm is in full before starting on the next one.
Donning the Weight Belt:
Crappy wording... someone please explain this, if at all possible :).



Donning the Unit:


Make sure BCD shoulder releases (if present) are connected.
Have buddy hold it.
Slip into it like a jacket.
Straighten any straps and make sure all hoses and accessories are free.
Have buddy let go of the unit.
Bend forward and balance the tank on my back.
Make sure that the waist belt release opens to the left.
When feel secure, stand upright and lean my head back. If I touch the tank, its too high. If so, go all the hell back to the start of the “Assembling the Gear”... &%$^
Donning the Mask:


I am too cheap to buy defog, so spit on the expensive equipment... (someone explain to me how to do this, please)
Hold mask against face while pulling the strap back with the other hand.
Donning the Fins:
Note: If I have to walk, walk backwards...


Wet fins and boots.
Have buddy hold me up (yeah right) and balance me.
Put on fins one at a time.
Work foot into fin and pull the strap.
Can someone help me with this endeavor, or will the fins I order come with instructions?



The Actual Dive:
(De/In)flating the BCD:


Press the inflation button.
Press and release the above in short bursts until neutrally buoyant.

mitsuguy
06-09-2009, 17:59
Gonna add two key things to the regulator assembly area...

When you first get the tank, might not be a bad idea to check that it is within it's hydrostatic test date and verify max operating pressure. Also, once the regulator is installed, prior to breathing off of it, you might smell it first. A malfunctioning compressor or filter that is worn out may not be doing its job resulting in a foul smell. Also, growth / bacteria inside a regulator that has not been cleaned recently is not good and may produce a foul odor as well.

Weight belt (if used):

once assembled with proper weights, the easiest way to put it on is to hold the buckle in your left hand, the free end in your right hand while holding it in front of you... step into it, then lift it up til it's around your waist - now lean forward so that the weight is on your back - slide the free end into the buckle, tighten snugly... observe that it is in the "right hand release" position...

no need to change things for right vs left hand - regs always on the right - if you were to try and reverse it on a standard rig, you would have your low pressure inflator hose for the BC on the opposite side as where it needs to be... as far as the opening of the tank valve and holding the pressure gauge - feel free to do whatever works for you there - I like to teach students to hold the pressure gauge up against the BCD while opening the tank valve - this would go a little further in preventing harm to anyone should the SPG shatter (that being said, a SPG shattering is pretty uncommon event) - I've probably witnessed over 5,000 (maybe even significantly more) tanks being turned on and never once a failure

bennerman
06-09-2009, 18:03
Gonna add two key things to the regulator assembly area...

When you first get the tank, might not be a bad idea to check that it is within it's hydrostatic test date. Also, once the regulator is installed, prior to breathing off of it, you might smell it first. A malfunctioning compressor or filter that is worn out may not be doing its job resulting in a foul smell. Also, growth / bacteria inside a regulator that has not been cleaned recently is not good and may produce a foul odor as well.

Weight belt (if used):

once assembled with proper weights, the easiest way to put it on is to hold the buckle in your left hand, the free end in your right hand while holding it in front of you... step into it, then lift it up til it's around your waist - now lean forward so that the weight is on your back - slide the free end into the buckle, tighten snugly... observe that it is in the "right hand release" position...

Thanks, the dvd sounds awful, so I thought she was saying "the free and" instead of end.

plot
06-09-2009, 18:13
Turning on Scuba Unit:

Hold SPG with left* hand facing away from me (in case it explodes!!!)
Open valve slowly. If I hear a small leak, turn off and report to the instructor.
Assuming no leaks, open fully.
Check SPG and compare it to pressure in tank.
Test regulator by purging it. It should start when the button is pressed, and stop when the button is released
Exhale through it. If exhalation is difficult, the exhaust valve may be stuck. Report to instructor.
Assuming all is well, take a breaths from the regulator.


As for which hand to use, depends on if you're standing in front or behind your tank.

Typically you turn your tank on before you put your gear on, so you stand behind it if it's on the ground. If you're standing behind it, the tank valve will be on your right side, so naturally you will hold the SPG with your left hand while you turn the valve on with your right hand.

If you're standing in front of your tank when you turn it on (for example, if you're on a diveboat and your gear is sitting on a bench), when you're facing the tank the valve will be on the left side, so you can hold the SPG in your right hand while turning the tank on with your left hand.

plot
06-09-2009, 18:18
Also, instead of spitting on your mask, get some baby shampoo and water it down, put it in a squirt bottle, and use that. You can also use this mixture to spray yourself down to slip into your wetsuit easier. Baby shampoo is good to soak your gear in too for cleaning purposes.

If you really wanna go the spit route, you basically hock a loogie in your mask, rub it around, then lightly rinse it out... basically you want a spit/snot film on your mask.


the fins are self explanatory. you'll see when you get them.

bennerman
06-09-2009, 18:34
Also, instead of spitting on your mask, get some baby shampoo and water it down, put it in a squirt bottle, and use that. You can also use this mixture to spray yourself down to slip into your wetsuit easier. Baby shampoo is good to soak your gear in too for cleaning purposes.

If you really wanna go the spit route, you basically hock a loogie in your mask, rub it around, then lightly rinse it out... basically you want a spit/snot film on your mask.


the fins are self explanatory. you'll see when you get them.

Now if you hadn't used "Loogie" or "Snot", it wouldn't have been a problem... thanks alot!... seriously... thanks for the idea :). Why Baby shampoo as opposed to regular shampoo?

mitsuguy
06-09-2009, 18:36
baby shampoo doesn't burn your eyes

bennerman
06-09-2009, 18:58
Ah, no tears :)