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Darthwader
06-26-2009, 09:12
these are just questions that have been percolating for some time now but I'm not having any luck getting answers online.

How does one go about getting qualified for independant servicing of your gear?

For example:
Can I do my own Viz on my cylinders? (more importantly, can I certify the viz on my own cylinders)

How does one get training/authorization for regulator servicing?

My reasoning is about the same for my wanting a home fill station; Self-sufficiancy and convinience. (and, as I've stated before, my nearest LDS is now an hour's drive away)

MSilvia
06-26-2009, 09:33
How does one go about getting qualified for independant servicing of your gear?

It depends on the gear, and on what you mean by "qualified". Becoming knowledgable and having the right tools for the job is not the same as being factory authorized.


Can I do my own Viz on my cylinders? (more importantly, can I certify the viz on my own cylinders)

Sure, if you get trained as a VIP inspector. I'm not sure where you would do that, but in my area a class is offered annually at the Boston Sea Rovers conference.


How does one get training/authorization for regulator servicing?

Usually through a LDS, working as a gear tech. If that isn't your speed, and you don't care about warranty issues, there's an excellent book on regulator repair and maintainance from AirSpeed Press.

Darthwader
06-26-2009, 09:44
How does one go about getting qualified for independant servicing of your gear?

It depends on the gear, and on what you mean by "qualified". Becoming knowledgable and having the right tools for the job is not the same as being factory authorized.


Can I do my own Viz on my cylinders? (more importantly, can I certify the viz on my own cylinders)

Sure, if you get trained as a VIP inspector. I'm not sure where you would do that, but in my area a class is offered annually at the Boston Sea Rovers conference.


How does one get training/authorization for regulator servicing?

Usually through a LDS, working as a gear tech. If that isn't your speed, and you don't care about warranty issues, there's an excellent book on regulator repair and maintainance from AirSpeed Press.

thanks matt, you've come through again! (and I'm ordering that DIR book by Jarod Jablonski)

one thing that sparked my curiosity was a comment someone made about cylinders coming into a shop with homemade stickers on them. it cause me to wonder, If I'm authorized to do my own cylinder Vips, how do I communicate this to the Dive shop?

UCFKnightDiver
06-26-2009, 09:52
show them your vip card TDI or PSI

Recon
06-26-2009, 10:02
ST is about 1 hour, if not more due to traffic from my house, but there is no way that I would stop going in there :), unless wayne trys to sell me that darn DPV again LOL :smilie39::smilie39:

~Recon

Jack Hammer
06-26-2009, 13:11
As far as servicing your own gear goes, I'll put it how it was explained to me by several experienced technicians. Most of your gear isn't all that difficult to "service" for mechanically minded folks, the trouble is in properly servicing and adjusting your gear and most importantly recognizing and dealing with irregularities that may be overlooked by people not fully experienced and familiar with it.

Point being if you want to service your own gear, fine, learn to do it properly and learn all the subtle nuances (if any) of your gear. Basically, just don't go into it half-assed.

Jack

navyhmc
06-26-2009, 14:50
Point being if you want to service your own gear, fine, learn to do it properly and learn all the subtle nuances (if any) of your gear. Basically, just don't go into it half-assed.

Jack

That is the most important qualifier!!! Don't go into it half-assed! Don't start a service project when you're rushed or can't give it 120% on your attention and concentration. And absolutely, positively know what your doing!!!

CompuDude
06-26-2009, 15:47
If you want to viz your own tanks, and have any shot of a local shop honoring your vis sticker (if you EVER get your tanks filled anywhere other than your own home fill station), you'll want to get PSI certified.

PSI / PCI (http://www.psicylinders.com/)

Follow the links to find out where the closest classes to you are being held.

Factory-authorized service certifications are very difficult to come by outside of employment at a dive shop. Not impossible, but difficult nonetheless.

IMO, unless you are servicing lots of your own regs, you may do better to just use ScubaToys for reg service and mail them in.

Factory service for BCs is not generally required. Some good basic training from a mentor and a dollap of common sense should take care of most needs like that.

awap
06-26-2009, 16:46
IMO, unless you are servicing lots of your own regs, you may do better to just use ScubaToys for reg service and mail them in.


If you start servicing your own regs, you will probably end up with lots of regulators as service costs are no longer a problem.

And it is not so much the economics (but you will save $$ in time) as the satisfaction of knowing your gear and that it was serviced the way you want it.

in_cavediver
06-26-2009, 18:49
IMO, unless you are servicing lots of your own regs, you may do better to just use ScubaToys for reg service and mail them in.


If you start servicing your own regs, you will probably end up with lots of regulators as service costs are no longer a problem.

And it is not so much the economics (but you will save $$ in time) as the satisfaction of knowing your gear and that it was serviced the way you want it.

There does come a point when economics sets in - usually after the 6th or 7th regulator. I wouldn't pay someone do mine - 9 of them.

Darthwader
06-27-2009, 00:11
If you want to viz your own tanks, and have any shot of a local shop honoring your vis sticker (if you EVER get your tanks filled anywhere other than your own home fill station), you'll want to get PSI certified.

PSI / PCI (http://www.psicylinders.com/)

Follow the links to find out where the closest classes to you are being held.

Factory-authorized service certifications are very difficult to come by outside of employment at a dive shop. Not impossible, but difficult nonetheless.

IMO, unless you are servicing lots of your own regs, you may do better to just use ScubaToys for reg service and mail them in.

Factory service for BCs is not generally required. Some good basic training from a mentor and a dollap of common sense should take care of most needs like that.

Thanks CD, appreciate the links.
2nd echelon maintenence was an area that interested right from the very beginning. It just seem natural to me that a conscientious diver would want to know the gear he dives.

navyhmc
06-27-2009, 07:33
If you want to viz your own tanks, and have any shot of a local shop honoring your vis sticker (if you EVER get your tanks filled anywhere other than your own home fill station), you'll want to get PSI certified.

PSI / PCI (http://www.psicylinders.com/)

Follow the links to find out where the closest classes to you are being held.

Factory-authorized service certifications are very difficult to come by outside of employment at a dive shop. Not impossible, but difficult nonetheless.

IMO, unless you are servicing lots of your own regs, you may do better to just use ScubaToys for reg service and mail them in.

Factory service for BCs is not generally required. Some good basic training from a mentor and a dollap of common sense should take care of most needs like that.

I do so wish they were coming to KS for a class.:smiley20:

Darthwader
06-27-2009, 08:19
If you want to viz your own tanks, and have any shot of a local shop honoring your vis sticker (if you EVER get your tanks filled anywhere other than your own home fill station), you'll want to get PSI certified.

PSI / PCI (http://www.psicylinders.com/)

Follow the links to find out where the closest classes to you are being held.

Factory-authorized service certifications are very difficult to come by outside of employment at a dive shop. Not impossible, but difficult nonetheless.

IMO, unless you are servicing lots of your own regs, you may do better to just use ScubaToys for reg service and mail them in.

Factory service for BCs is not generally required. Some good basic training from a mentor and a dollap of common sense should take care of most needs like that.

I do so wish they were coming to KS for a class.:smiley20:

I see that I'm out of luck for anything this far north. I was hoping there'd be something around Green Bay/Milwaukee area at least.

awap
06-27-2009, 11:44
If you want to viz your own tanks, and have any shot of a local shop honoring your vis sticker (if you EVER get your tanks filled anywhere other than your own home fill station), you'll want to get PSI certified.

PSI / PCI (http://www.psicylinders.com/)

Follow the links to find out where the closest classes to you are being held.

Factory-authorized service certifications are very difficult to come by outside of employment at a dive shop. Not impossible, but difficult nonetheless.

IMO, unless you are servicing lots of your own regs, you may do better to just use ScubaToys for reg service and mail them in.

Factory service for BCs is not generally required. Some good basic training from a mentor and a dollap of common sense should take care of most needs like that.

I do so wish they were coming to KS for a class.:smiley20:

I see that I'm out of luck for anything this far north. I was hoping there'd be something around Green Bay/Milwaukee area at least.

That course just may not be worth it for you unless you have quite a few tanks that you want someone else to fill. I believe the course runs runs about $200 and is only good for 3 years. And if you are running your own compressor, you don't need the VIP sticker.

navyhmc
06-27-2009, 13:31
True awap, but I'm interested for the fine points of tank maintenence. Kind of like taking a specialty course. No matter what I still have the added knowledge.

awap
06-27-2009, 13:55
True awap, but I'm interested for the fine points of tank maintenence. Kind of like taking a specialty course. No matter what I still have the added knowledge.

I suspect, as with so many things in scuba, you can acquire the knowledge without taking the course if certification is not your goal.

navyhmc
06-27-2009, 14:04
True awap, but I'm interested for the fine points of tank maintenence. Kind of like taking a specialty course. No matter what I still have the added knowledge.

I suspect, as with so many things in scuba, you can acquire the knowledge without taking the course if certification is not your goal.

True, but I have learned that there are some nuances of the topic that are lost without taking the desired course(s) no matter what they are. Also any questions will hopefully be answered and hoepfully avoid misinterpreting some of the information.:smiley20:

in_cavediver
06-28-2009, 07:33
The course and certification really aren't required since VIP is an industry thing not a force of law. That said, its a really really good idea to do them and its a really really good idea to take a formal course in this. If nothing else, a competent class will have example tanks on how/why things failed (or should fail) the inspection.

My class wasn't PSI but it was pretty good. About 1.5 hours classroom and 3-4 hours practicals. We saw tanks with SLC, bad exemption numbers, pits, bows, bad liners, bad rust, dings, damaged threads etc. It was well worth the money.

navyhmc
06-28-2009, 07:40
And that's what I'm looking for in_cavediver.

Darthwader
06-28-2009, 21:50
The course and certification really aren't required since VIP is an industry thing not a force of law. That said, its a really really good idea to do them and its a really really good idea to take a formal course in this. If nothing else, a competent class will have example tanks on how/why things failed (or should fail) the inspection.

My class wasn't PSI but it was pretty good. About 1.5 hours classroom and 3-4 hours practicals. We saw tanks with SLC, bad exemption numbers, pits, bows, bad liners, bad rust, dings, damaged threads etc. It was well worth the money.
That's why I would like a formal class, so I can better understand and evaluate my gear. I think it's worth the $$, and it's broad enough;it's not like factory certs for each branded Regulator.