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doimber
08-20-2009, 17:30
i couldn't tell if you have to be able to swim twenty meters or if it's two hundred. could some one tell me?





super noob

mrmccoy
08-20-2009, 18:19
I'm assuming your talking about for an open water certification.....most agencies it is 200 meters

cmburch
08-20-2009, 18:51
20M is not even the one length of a 25yd wide pool. I assume it is 200M so 4 lengths of a 50M pool.

It would not hurt to hop in a pool and practice. 200yd x 3 should be an easy warm-up. 200yd freestyle, 200yd flutter kick with a board, and 200yd freestyle pull with a pull buoy.

You will pass with ease!

comet24
08-20-2009, 19:05
20M is not even the one length of a 25yd wide pool. I assume it is 200M so 4 lengths of a 50M pool.



Most pools are not 50M and most that are have bulkheads in them set at 25M unless hosting a swimming event. Most community pools are 25 Meters or Yards depending on the age of the pool.

cmburch
08-20-2009, 19:36
20M is not even the one length of a 25yd wide pool. I assume it is 200M so 4 lengths of a 50M pool.



Most pools are not 50M and most that are have bulkheads in them set at 25M unless hosting a swimming event. Most community pools are 25 Meters or Yards depending on the age of the pool.


Thanks for the info. Olympic pools in my area generally are 25yd by 50M. There are longer pools at some institutions that are longer than 50M that use a bulkhead to set the length at 50M. I have never swam in a 50M pool with bulkheads set to 25yd or in a pool that is 25M in length. If the lane lines are not in for the 25yd width then at certain times during the day swimmers can swim the 50M length and not wait for a special event. Swimmers need to practice some before a Meet.

comet24
08-20-2009, 19:43
20M is not even the one length of a 25yd wide pool. I assume it is 200M so 4 lengths of a 50M pool.



Most pools are not 50M and most that are have bulkheads in them set at 25M unless hosting a swimming event. Most community pools are 25 Meters or Yards depending on the age of the pool.


Thanks for the info. Olympic pools in my area generally are 25yd by 50M. There are longer pools at some institutions that are longer than 50M that use a bulkhead to set the length at 50M. I have never swam in a 50M pool with bulkheads set to 25yd or in a pool that is 25M in length. If the lane lines are not in for the 25yd width then at certain times during the day swimmers can swim the 50M length and not wait for a special event. Swimmers need to practice some before a Meet.

I wish most of our pools where 50M. People here also call 25M pools Olympic pools but I just don't know why. I guess it bothers me because I used to swim when I was younger.

navyhmc
08-20-2009, 22:50
When I swam league, the pool was a 50yds x 25 yd "L" and the lines were on the 50 yd length. We couldn't do the young swimmer relays and short lengths because they were to be 25 yrd events. But most ools were 25 yds.

Vlane
08-20-2009, 23:12
Dang, am I one of the few people here who sucks at swimming? Stick me underwater and I can hang but on the surface I'm struggling after a few laps.

CompuDude
08-21-2009, 12:58
Dang, am I one of the few people here who sucks at swimming? Stick me underwater and I can hang but on the surface I'm struggling after a few laps.

I'd seriously consider some swimming lessons. They're not terribly expensive, and can save your life.

If you have the basics down, it's just a matter of refining technique. A halfway decent swimming instructor should be able to make swimming a LOT more relaxing for you... the reason you're working too hard is because you're not doing it right. Once you learn to do it correctly, swimming is easy and relaxing.

Scuba Pete
08-21-2009, 13:26
I was on the team in High School. You never forget the technique no matter how long you have been out of the water. I can always tell when i see someone swimming that swam competitivly. Seriously take some lessons and get better technique, swimming will become extremly easy and you will find your self floating along enjoying the sights and sounds. You could also join an adult league and get free lessons and get in alot better shape at the same time. I remember losing around 20-30 lbs the first 2 weeks I was on the team.

scubadiver888
08-21-2009, 14:32
Being a strong swimming can get you in trouble. I surfaced at the bow of the boat and started swimming to the stern. Unknown to me I had hooked the anchor line (from the bow of the boat to the mooring buoy) to my first stage. Stared swimming for the stern and swimming and swimming. I knew there was a little bit of current but this seemed ridiculous. Wasn't until the boat drifted into me that I realized I was towing the thing. :smilie39:

Scuba Pete
08-21-2009, 14:46
We swam the entire length of the Speigel grove from stern to bow and back at about 70-90 feet, We had enough time to screw around at the bow and take some pictures from about 10-12ft infront and we screwed around the entire dive looking in holes and mounting the mounted guns. I have a picture of that somewhere. The DM didnt beleive us until we showed him the picture of the bow. This was a few years ago and I hadnt gotten into diving doubles yet. I did get bit by the cavern/cave bug on that trip though.

Vlane
08-21-2009, 16:11
I'd seriously consider some swimming lessons. They're not terribly expensive, and can save your life.

If you have the basics down, it's just a matter of refining technique. A halfway decent swimming instructor should be able to make swimming a LOT more relaxing for you... the reason you're working too hard is because you're not doing it right. Once you learn to do it correctly, swimming is easy and relaxing.
I took swimming lessons when i was little and in grade school but i think the main problem is i'm lacking in the muscle department. I'm 5'6" and about 115, not a lot of muscle on me. Once school starts back up i plan on working out again to try and fix this, i'm sure my technique could use some work though.

cmburch
08-22-2009, 00:11
Yeah, the wife is 5' 7" 115lb. She use to come and swim off to the side during waterpolo practice. I thought she knew how to swim until she sighed us up for a SCUBA class at school. She was only able to do some lopsided modified breaststroke. They offer swim courses at many colleges. The beginners start in the shallow end and by the end of the session are swimming freestyle, breaststroke, and backstroke. I see a few that can barely make it across one length without stopping the first week of class, swimming laps without stopping by week 5 or so.

Vercingetorix
08-22-2009, 08:40
During class, one of the requirements is to tread water for 20 minutes without your face touching the water. I was surprised by the number of folks who struggled with this.


... But most ools were 25 yds.and on a side note, I noticed navyhmc's spelling of "ool". I'm glad to see there is no "p" in his "pool"; makes for a more pleasant, and healthier, experience.:smiley36:

doimber
08-22-2009, 13:15
hahahahahahahahahahaha some little kid came over yesterday and put the p in my pool but now my ool is clean. i had to clean it he also but the poop in my pool

BRsnow
08-22-2009, 23:11
I hit the gym, 5 or so days a week and get do some serious mountain biking here in CO, 30-40 miles or tough terrain...I decided to start swimming at the gym as I have had some back issues as of late....well I did 8 laps, and was done...I can swim fine, but endurance was an issue...will keep at it though, was a bit humbling...BR

inventor
09-21-2009, 09:15
In my Open Water class, there was a doctor that ran marathons. We were all amazed that he didn't seem to blow bubbles but about every two minutes. That's an exagerration, but his air use was unbelievalble compared to ours.

That, and generally not being that great at moving around in water, and only lasting 30 mins on an Al 80, got me thinking. So, going to be taking swim lessons at local rec center here. Part of town I just moved from had three competing rec center systems, two cities and the county. They offer tons of programs and instruction. Doing this because manuevering in water is not easy, and surface swims kill me. That and I'm out of shape.

Those wanting to learn or improve their technique or stamina, or just get in shape should try this also. The regular swimmers at the rec center can seemingly just swim and run forever.

TJDiver
09-21-2009, 10:06
I'd seriously consider some swimming lessons. They're not terribly expensive, and can save your life.

If you have the basics down, it's just a matter of refining technique. A halfway decent swimming instructor should be able to make swimming a LOT more relaxing for you... the reason you're working too hard is because you're not doing it right. Once you learn to do it correctly, swimming is easy and relaxing.
I took swimming lessons when i was little and in grade school but i think the main problem is i'm lacking in the muscle department. I'm 5'6" and about 115, not a lot of muscle on me. Once school starts back up i plan on working out again to try and fix this, i'm sure my technique could use some work though.

Need to focus more on technique than muscle. My son is about the same build...but, 3" taller at 5'9", and only weighs 115...and, he swims like a fish. Seeing as we live lake front, he's had plenty of opportunity to get in the water and is very comfortable. Nothing wrong with working out too, but just know that's not going to automatically improve your swimming skills.

urdiving
10-18-2009, 02:32
I know diving you technically do more kicking with your fins than anything. It really makes you a lazy swimmer. I have to do 400 meters for Asst Instructor I think it was the same for my rescue diver cert (that was in 1999 so Im older now!) For two weeks before I started I swam at the pool at my local gym and did weights to nearly two a day for the whole time. My stomach muscles and the shoulders were sore but I watched the other swimmers under water and watched them to. I do better stretching and kicking on one side at a time also kick off the wall and swim under water as long as you can this will cut the 50 meter way down to what you actually have to push through too! Watch the olympic swimmers online you will find some techniques that your are better at. Invest in some goggles target about 4 to 6 bucks, and a nose plug this increased my time! Invest in deep conditioners for the hair and lotion and massage oil daily after showers my skin got really dry fast! lol hope this helps
My metabolism increased greatly and i have lost 6 pounds!!! I only have 5 more to go to get back to my weight 15 years ago!

ScubaGir1
10-18-2009, 03:34
Yes, no matter how long its been since you've swam competively, it never leaves your system. I swam competitely for 13 years and I love it. I highly recommend getting more comfortable in the water...just takes some quality time in the pool. :)

Lulubelle
10-18-2009, 08:50
Most US pools are 25 yards or 50 yards. My brother had to do some pretty significant adjustments to his best event (50M freestyle) when he made the change to the big leagues. Going from 50yards to 50meters changed his time from 19 secs to 21 secs (plus whatever crazy fraction they can now capture)

Agreed with advice to get swimming lessons Vlane. Even strong and experienced swimmers often get help with their stroke. I also agree that it is not your height/weight that is the issue. The best swimmers tend to be skinny, skinny. Fit yes, but thin. But you don't need to be a speed demon with your swimming, just strong and confident. I don't swim terribly fast, but I can power through any current pretty much. Good luck.

clavicl3
10-18-2009, 23:56
I too am a weak swimmer. My legs sink and also, let's just say I cause more drag in the water than most. Maybe it's lack of technique, but I think the problem is my breathing technique. I find myself not able to get into rhythm so that I can breathe normally so holding my breath, and then trying to breathe in a lot of air quickly causes me to become exhausted quickly.

CompuDude
10-19-2009, 14:27
I too am a weak swimmer. My legs sink and also, let's just say I cause more drag in the water than most. Maybe it's lack of technique, but I think the problem is my breathing technique. I find myself not able to get into rhythm so that I can breathe normally so holding my breath, and then trying to breathe in a lot of air quickly causes me to become exhausted quickly.

The #1 rule of scuba for new divers, of course, is NEVER HOLD YOUR BREATH.

So stop that. You'll hurt yourself badly.

clavicl3
10-19-2009, 14:33
I too am a weak swimmer. My legs sink and also, let's just say I cause more drag in the water than most. Maybe it's lack of technique, but I think the problem is my breathing technique. I find myself not able to get into rhythm so that I can breathe normally so holding my breath, and then trying to breathe in a lot of air quickly causes me to become exhausted quickly.

The #1 rule of scuba for new divers, of course, is NEVER HOLD YOUR BREATH.

So stop that. You'll hurt yourself badly.

I'm fine when I'm diving. Regulator in my mouth is just fine. I have the above problem when swimming.

CompuDude
10-19-2009, 15:34
I too am a weak swimmer. My legs sink and also, let's just say I cause more drag in the water than most. Maybe it's lack of technique, but I think the problem is my breathing technique. I find myself not able to get into rhythm so that I can breathe normally so holding my breath, and then trying to breathe in a lot of air quickly causes me to become exhausted quickly.

The #1 rule of scuba for new divers, of course, is NEVER HOLD YOUR BREATH.

So stop that. You'll hurt yourself badly.

I'm fine when I'm diving. Regulator in my mouth is just fine. I have the above problem when swimming.

Ah, gotcha. :smiley20:

ccoceangirl
10-19-2009, 17:55
With Padi its 200 meter swim or a 300 meter swim with mask, fins and snorkle. You dont have to be a strong swimmer just an ok swimmer if that. I am horrible at swimming. I had to take lessons to do my divemaster.

clavicl3
10-19-2009, 18:04
With Padi its 200 meter swim or a 300 meter swim with mask, fins and snorkle. You dont have to be a strong swimmer just an ok swimmer if that. I am horrible at swimming. I had to take lessons to do my divemaster.

I opted for the 300 meter swim with the mask, fins, and snorkel. As I have stated above, my main difficulty with swimming is my breathing, which obviously the snorkel fixed. I have to ask though, what kind of pool did you guys do your swim in? I was in a pool that I literally kicked off the wall from one side and reached the other side just from the momentum alone. I know it doesn't take a great swimmer to scuba dive, but I just can't see using that short of a distance as a means of judging whether someone is a decent enough swimmer or not.

comet24
10-19-2009, 18:10
Technique matter more then anything else when swimming. Take anyone who has swam competitively as some point in their life and throw them in the water with someone in great shape but doesn't really know how to swim and the swimmer will put then to sham, doesn't matter if they are overweight and out of shape.

What I'm am trying to say is find someone that knows how to swim well and have them teach you a few things. Good stroke and rhythm are everything.

I am out of shape, have knee issues but can still swim very well because I once swam competitively(almost 20 years ago) and learned very good strokes.

FWIW the PADI swim test is not all that hard. Very few people fail it. If you can swim down the length without stopping you should be fine.

CompuDude
10-19-2009, 19:57
With Padi its 200 meter swim or a 300 meter swim with mask, fins and snorkle. You dont have to be a strong swimmer just an ok swimmer if that. I am horrible at swimming. I had to take lessons to do my divemaster.

I opted for the 300 meter swim with the mask, fins, and snorkel. As I have stated above, my main difficulty with swimming is my breathing, which obviously the snorkel fixed. I have to ask though, what kind of pool did you guys do your swim in? I was in a pool that I literally kicked off the wall from one side and reached the other side just from the momentum alone. I know it doesn't take a great swimmer to scuba dive, but I just can't see using that short of a distance as a means of judging whether someone is a decent enough swimmer or not.

I agree, they did you a disservice by letting you take the test in a pool that small, whether or not the rules let them get away with it.

That said, as long as you can swim well enough, it doesn't really matter.

The key to the swim test (at the OW level), is to remember that there is no time limit, and no speed limit. Swim slow, take it easy. You should be able to dog paddle it if you have to, the point is you can cover distance without drowning, not win a race. Do the breast stroke, if you can, and your head is above water most of the time... breathing is not an issue. Switch it up... can you do the back stroke? Or breast stroke laying on your back? Take a break and do that one for a while. Then you're face up and breathing normally the whole time.

emt
10-19-2009, 20:31
20M is not even the one length of a 25yd wide pool. I assume it is 200M so 4 lengths of a 50M pool.

It would not hurt to hop in a pool and practice. 200yd x 3 should be an easy warm-up. 200yd freestyle, 200yd flutter kick with a board, and 200yd freestyle pull with a pull buoy.

You will pass with ease!


I thought the same as you 28 years ago. Unfortunately a friend of mine proved me wrong and could not swim 100 yards with BC & go to bottom (15ft) & pick up a rock & swim back to shore... He did 3 things well 1. work in an indoor environment 2. play cards 3. sit in his chair & watch Miss America pageants...

WASP7000
12-04-2009, 12:55
200. I almost died (not really), I suck at swimming I guess. But the only way to get better is to swim I suppose. I kinda sink like a rock so it was especially hard for me, and I'm not a swimmer so I used a lot of muscles I don't normally use.

Filippo
01-05-2010, 04:24
I've met several divers who cant swim. Pretty amazing IMO.

scubagirlj
01-05-2010, 08:13
i used to swim competatively as a kid(400 IM and backstroke leg of relay) but since having double rotator cuff surguries(sp?) i can't use my arms to stroke(settle down boys) very much-i do do about 800 yards a day 2-3 times a week by laying on my back and just kicking,adding in some backstroke when i feel comfortable enough-all the people in the lap lanes use these little "fitness fins" that have a really short wide blade-i went to lds and got a kids pr of split snorlke fins so i am really stylin"!-the main thing to do is just get in the pool and keep trying until you feel absolutely comfortable in the water

dkh6070
01-05-2010, 11:44
I'm a swimmer. Best way to become comfortable in the water and a better swimmer is to get in the water and swim. Technique can be learned by taking a class or self taught with books and video. Once you have good technique, all you need to do is swim using that same technique. Don't be sloppy. Swimming is not really rocket science. There is a reason swimmers practice 7-12 times a week with multi practice days. Endurance and speed is gained and lost extremely fast in swimming. Just because you could swim 400 meters last month does not mean you can do it today if you have not been in the water for 30 days. If you are not good at distance then you should swim distances. If you are not fast, you should swim fast. This and this alone will get you better.


i can't use my arms to stroke

SGJ, No arms needed. It the same as giving a women a vacuum for her birthday.

scubagirlj
01-05-2010, 11:56
SGJ, No arms needed. It the same as giving a women a vacuum for her birthday.[/quote]

getting into dangerous water(no pun intended)

dkh6070
01-05-2010, 12:00
getting into dangerous water(no pun intended)


Then you should definitely NOT read my comment on the other thread any time soon. I'm a great swimmer but not comfortable with a revengeful predator circling.:smiley31:

Blowin Bubbles
01-13-2010, 19:24
Relatively new diver here. My endurance in the water is pretty low. I'm an average type of guy (not fat or chubby, but i'm not super fit). Anyhow, was wondering on some in-water/on-land exercises to improve my situation.

Also, I've noticed that my ankles are often sore while diving. To the point of needing to stop and rest them. Was wondering if more exercise with fins on would strengthen my ankles? or should i try another form of exercise?

Anyways, I've bantered enough. Any help would be awesome.

Thanks

-Coop

dkh6070
01-14-2010, 08:34
... I've noticed that my ankles are often sore while diving. To the point of needing to stop and rest them. Was wondering if more exercise with fins on would strengthen my ankles? or should i try another form of exercise?

Hey Coop, When I first started I had the same problem. At teh end of my last cert dive they told us we could swim around the pier area to practice more bouyancy control and navigation. I wanted to get out because my ankle and feet were so sore. To the point I went back to my LDS and asked if I had wrong size fins or something. They let me try others but I stayed with the origanal fins and honestly they fit perfect. Also had a very sore nose because of equalizing by pinching my nose to clear my ears. You will get used to it. I'm a good swimmer and do long ditance swims 3-5 miles, so I don't think it was becasue I'm a bad or weak swimmer, only becuause you are not used to the force the fins puts on that joint. Your body will adjust. With more diving you will get more efficient at it as well. Make sure you are using good kick movements and your ankles will adapt to fins. :smiley20:

CompuDude
01-14-2010, 10:24
... I've noticed that my ankles are often sore while diving. To the point of needing to stop and rest them. Was wondering if more exercise with fins on would strengthen my ankles? or should i try another form of exercise?

Hey Coop, When I first started I had the same problem. At teh end of my last cert dive they told us we could swim around the pier area to practice more bouyancy control and navigation. I wanted to get out because my ankle and feet were so sore. To the point I went back to my LDS and asked if I had wrong size fins or something. They let me try others but I stayed with the origanal fins and honestly they fit perfect. Also had a very sore nose because of equalizing by pinching my nose to clear my ears. You will get used to it. I'm a good swimmer and do long ditance swims 3-5 miles, so I don't think it was becasue I'm a bad or weak swimmer, only becuause you are not used to the force the fins puts on that joint. Your body will adjust. With more diving you will get more efficient at it as well. Make sure you are using good kick movements and your ankles will adapt to fins. :smiley20:

Yup. Practice makes perfect. The particular movement used just doesn't happen outside the water, so it takes time and practice to get those muscles used to moving that way. Dive dive dive!

cmburch
01-14-2010, 11:01
Take it easy kickiing if haven't been diving in a while.

Do not try to race or keep up with someone. Ask them to slow down.

I grab on to bull kelp to rest if I am in a current rather than continuosly kicking against it.

I get in the pool with a kickboard and exercise those muscles and joints a few days before the dive if I haven't been in a couple of weeks.

Split fins may help.

cgvmer
01-14-2010, 11:23
Even though diving and swimming seem almost mutually exclusive, I found that spending some time in the pool definitely helps my air consumption. I'm not fast but I try to do 2000-2400 yds 3 times a week. Takes me an hour but after wards I can stay under much longer, its more than just exercise, it's the rhythmic breathing and comfort in water that helps, this is just my opionion

Blowin Bubbles
01-15-2010, 12:30
Thanks guys.

I figured it was just a lack of muscle strength, but just wanted some other opinions on it.

To the pool I go.

dkh6070
01-18-2010, 06:55
Thanks guys.

I figured it was just a lack of muscle strength, but just wanted some other opinions on it.

To the pool I go.

Do you feel wierd going to the pool all bundled up from the cold weather? I always do.