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Nuts4koi
08-31-2009, 21:45
I just completed my OW certification dives on Aug 23:smiley20:. My primary instructor convinced me to go ahead and take the AOW class. She said there is no reason a new diver shouldn't take advantage of the education offered by the AOW class. I am really looking forward to it. We will be diving at the Blue Hole in New Mexico. I have heard nothing but good things about the Blue Hole. I also want to take the Peak Performance Buoyancy specialty class. I know my buoyancy control isn't what it should be. The AOW class should help, but I think the specialty class wil lbe even more helpful.

Largo
08-31-2009, 21:58
The 'Advanced' course should be all about your interests.
You should learn about navigation, and do a deep dive.
But, the instructor should structure the rest of the course around your interests.
In my opinion.

Vercingetorix
08-31-2009, 22:00
I took AOW immediately after OW. Actually, there was a three-month break between OW and AOW in which I did not dive (Texas quarries are COLD). You'll do fine, learn some stuff, explore a bit, and gain more confidence.

Have fun!!!

//FYI...like you, I started this hobby late in life. I was 55.

//On a side note, I see you're from Centennial. Did you ever read the book or see the mini-series? Both were pretty good.

Largo
08-31-2009, 22:06
I saw it. Andy Griffith found a skeleton near a road.

Television was VERY boring in the 1970s.

Also, Arthur Fonzarelli jumped over a shark using waterskis.

Nuts4koi
08-31-2009, 22:08
I took AOW immediately after OW. Actually, there was a three-month break between OW and AOW in which I did not dive (Texas quarries are COLD). You'll do fine, learn some stuff, explore a bit, and gain more confidence.

Have fun!!!

//FYI...like you, I started this hobby late in life. I was 55.

//On a side note, I see you're from Centennial. Did you ever read the book or see the mini-series? Both were pretty good.


I will have about a two month break. My AOW class is Oct 23-24, with the 20th being the classroom and pool session. I am hoping to dive the aquarium here in Denver before the AOW class.

I did a little better than read the book or see the mini-series. While it was being filmed here in Colorado, I got to work security for the film as an off duty State Trooper. Retired from that in 01.

Jay

Largo
08-31-2009, 22:13
Did you get to meet Andy Griffith?

Vercingetorix
08-31-2009, 22:14
My class room session was about 30 minutes long. We were told to show-up at the lake. We had no pool session.

State Trooper, eh? We have a number of representatives from law enforcement here on the forums. A few, I think, are public safety divers as well.

Nuts4koi
08-31-2009, 22:25
Did you get to meet Andy Griffith?
Nope. But I did get to meet Robert Conrad. Really nice guy:smiley20:. by the time I got to the site, most of the actors had left to get drunk.

Largo
08-31-2009, 22:29
I would have kicked his butt.

That battery commercial really left a bad taste in my mouth.

YouTube - 1977 Eveready Robert Conrad "Boxing" Commercial (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-IkulPFMxs&feature=PlayList&p=FF6C0E851676A532&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=5)


I H8 bullies. I also H8 1970s calculators and cassette players.

BubblesMcCoy
08-31-2009, 22:57
Blue hole is a fun dive. A bit chilly but definitely worth it. Good visibility for freshwater and fairly deep. Not sure how a navigation dive would work as there isn't much room to navigate. My buddy I try to do a long weekend there every year. Good luck on your class. It's also an altitude dive so I'd see if you're instructor will let you finnish that specialty as well.

navyhmc
08-31-2009, 23:44
The bonus of blue hole is that if you play your cards right, you can come away with an Altitude cert.

Okc_diver
09-01-2009, 01:55
when I did my AOW last year my instructor told me that diving at tenkiller or elmer thomas (for examples) was doing an altitude dive because we are not at sea level.

mitsuguy
09-01-2009, 02:25
when I did my AOW last year my instructor told me that diving at tenkiller or elmer thomas (for examples) was doing an altitude dive because we are not at sea level.

not sure of the altitudes there, but anything over 1000' amsl requires special procedures...

so, 500' amsl, not at sea level, but also, not an altitude dive... 1500' amsl, not at sea level, IS an altitude dive...

Smashee
09-01-2009, 02:38
so, 500' amsl, not at sea level, but also, not an altitude dive...

It can be, depending on the weather, your training and the tables you work from.

If the atmospheric pressure is less than about 990 millibar, then a dive 100m above sea level would fall into level 2 on the BSAC 88 tables and is classed as diving at altitude.

mitsuguy
09-01-2009, 02:51
so, 500' amsl, not at sea level, but also, not an altitude dive...

It can be, depending on the weather, your training and the tables you work from.

If the atmospheric pressure is less than about 990 millibar, then a dive 100m above sea level would fall into level 2 on the BSAC 88 tables and is classed as diving at altitude.

I don't know about the BSAC tables, only PADI and US Navy...

Strictly from a recreational sense, according to the US Navy and PADI, 1000' is the limit, however, from a technical diving aspect, the US Navy goes a little more in depth - a dive deeper than 145' can be considered diving at altitude, when you are more than 300' amsl...

navyhmc
09-01-2009, 03:04
when I did my AOW last year my instructor told me that diving at tenkiller or elmer thomas (for examples) was doing an altitude dive because we are not at sea level.

Elmer Thomas at 1350' asml would be an altitude dive for rec limits whereas Tenkiller at 650' amsl would be condsidered a sea level dive. My understanding is that anything under 1000' is sea level.

The caveat that Samshee brings up with barometric pressure can influence things too. I have been diving during the summer where the water is at 870' and my computer is saying a morning dive is sea level. The last dive of the day had a thunderstorm rolling in south of us and the computer was advising it was a "Alt 2" dive-above 2000'. So the weather will definitely affect the altitude reading.

Smashee
09-01-2009, 03:07
I don't know about the BSAC tables, only PADI and US Navy...

Strictly from a recreational sense, according to the US Navy and PADI, 1000' is the limit, however, from a technical diving aspect, the US Navy goes a little more in depth - a dive deeper than 145' can be considered diving at altitude, when you are more than 300' amsl...

The BSAC tables cover diving up to 2500-3200m, depending on local air pressure. You're not really going to get much done at those heights, though. :smiley36:They treat altitude as air-pressure, so you can be classed as diving at altitude even at sea-level if the weather is particularly crap. Not unusual in the UK or here in Oz.

mitsuguy
09-01-2009, 03:16
The BSAC tables cover diving up to 2500-3200m, depending on local air pressure. You're not really going to get much done at those heights, though. :smiley36:They treat altitude as air-pressure, so you can be classed as diving at altitude even at sea-level if the weather is particularly crap. Not unusual in the UK or here in Oz.

I completely understand the reasoning behind the barometric pressure defining your table conversion factors to use, but at the same time, not many people carry around barometers with them while diving, which makes their version a little impractical for the majority of the diving public...

PADI's tables go up to 10,000 ft, or, roughly 3000m amsl, which, assuming clear skies, is .714 ata...

Smashee
09-01-2009, 03:38
[quote=Smashee;328981]
I completely understand the reasoning behind the barometric pressure defining your table conversion factors to use, but at the same time, not many people carry around barometers with them while diving, which makes their version a little impractical for the majority of the diving public...


You might want to have a look at them. It's a lot easier than the way I'm explaining it. I suck at explaining stuff like this. :smiley36: There's a few copies floating around on the net, if you don't mind a little copy-vio.
Impractical's not the way I'd describe them, compared to the eyestrain inducing layout of the PADI tables, but yeah, they probably are a bit much for the majority of the diving public. A lot of Brit divers swear by them. Or at them. Or something.

mitsuguy
09-02-2009, 01:55
I completely understand the reasoning behind the barometric pressure defining your table conversion factors to use, but at the same time, not many people carry around barometers with them while diving, which makes their version a little impractical for the majority of the diving public...


You might want to have a look at them. It's a lot easier than the way I'm explaining it. I suck at explaining stuff like this. :smiley36: There's a few copies floating around on the net, if you don't mind a little copy-vio.
Impractical's not the way I'd describe them, compared to the eyestrain inducing layout of the PADI tables, but yeah, they probably are a bit much for the majority of the diving public. A lot of Brit divers swear by them. Or at them. Or something.

It would seem there is a lot of talk about those tables actually... some say they are conservative on the recreational side, and it sounds to me like they are almost dangerous on the decompression side when you compare their numbers to the software that is out there...

CompuDude
09-02-2009, 02:42
I just completed my OW certification dives on Aug 23:smiley20:. My primary instructor convinced me to go ahead and take the AOW class. She said there is no reason a new diver shouldn't take advantage of the education offered by the AOW class. I am really looking forward to it. We will be diving at the Blue Hole in New Mexico. I have heard nothing but good things about the Blue Hole. I also want to take the Peak Performance Buoyancy specialty class. I know my buoyancy control isn't what it should be. The AOW class should help, but I think the specialty class wil lbe even more helpful.

Be sure to take a night dive, as well!

Quero
09-02-2009, 12:55
<snip> I also want to take the Peak Performance Buoyancy specialty class. I know my buoyancy control isn't what it should be. The AOW class should help, but I think the specialty class wil lbe even more helpful.
IMO, the PPB class as part of the AOW is a great choice. Once you have the information the strategies for buoyancy control seem pretty obvious and intuitive, but for a new diver still dealing with task loading, it's very helpful to have it all spelled out and to have an instructor coach you so you can get it right. The PPB specialty is only one additional dive beyond the PPB Adventure dive, so essentially it ends up being another chance to put the skills to work under supervision.

I echo CompuDude's advice about the night dive as being a useful one as part of an AOW cert. And I'll add that here in the tropics at least, Fish ID or Underwater Naturalist may seem like "fluff" dives, but they are far from it. Most divers are there to see the wildlife, so it's quite useful to know the basics of how to figure out what you've seen. In your case, you might consider a Drysuit dive, or as mentioned above, an Altitude dive.

Nuts4koi
09-02-2009, 17:53
Be sure to take a night dive, as well![/quote]

The LDS I am taking the AOW course thru, almost requires a night dive:smiley32:. I realize I have the choice, but my choice would be for the night dive.