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View Full Version : Anyone every heard of this tank rated to 4350 psi



comet24
09-15-2009, 14:26
Looking at XSSCUBA site and saw this. I have no interested in this tank myself but found the design and ratings interesting. Anyone every see one or use one.

http://www.xsscuba.com/tank_lux_limited106.html

This is a special cylinder manufactured by Luxfer. It is a composite cylinder manufactured of both aluminum and fiberglass. It starts out as a standard scuba 80 cuft cylinder. Hoop-wrapped fiberglass and resin is added to strengthen
the side walls. This allows for an increased service pressure to 4350 psi and a capacity of 106 cubic feet. This cylinder falls under DOT Special Permit 12479. Requirements of SP12479 is a hydro re-test each three years and a fifteen year service life. The inlet to this cylinder is unlike most other scuba cylinders, utilizing 7/8" x 14 UNF threads (a smaller hole). The choice of valves is restricted to a 300 bar DIN valve with the correct 7/8" x 14 UNF threads.

turnpikemike
09-15-2009, 14:54
Yeah, I've heard of that. Sounds pretty crazy, and obviously the hydro every 3 years and 15-year service life seem bad. I always thought they were just made of fiberglass, which would probably have been horrible for buoyancy characteristics, but if it's part aluminum, I guess it wouldn't be too bad.

fisheater
09-15-2009, 15:02
And you're going to fill it where?

turnpikemike
09-15-2009, 15:32
I have no idea how many shops fill to such a high pressure, but it is just a standard din valve (all 4 of my steel tanks have the 300-bar valve). So they probably could fill it most places, right? I also have no interest in purchasing one of these. It's an interesting idea, though.

CompuDude
09-15-2009, 15:39
I have no idea how many shops fill to such a high pressure, but it is just a standard din valve (all 4 of my steel tanks have the 300-bar valve). So they probably could fill it most places, right? I also have no interest in purchasing one of these. It's an interesting idea, though.

Putting some air in it and actually filling it are different matters. Few shops will go that high... it's really tough on the compressors.

Fire departments use them, sometimes, and have fill stations that can go that high. Easier with a government budget. Joel, the owner of TDL, has a few of the carbon fiber tanks from Faber that he bought to try out, but rarely uses them... they're easily damaged, expensive to fill, and have lousy buoyancy characteristics.

Jack Hammer
09-15-2009, 15:55
Basically what everyone already said, expensive, difficult to get filled, hard on regs, high maintenance. Probably better for the paintball crowd than the diving crowd.

I look at it as a specialized tool that I'll likely never have a need for.

Smashee
09-15-2009, 15:56
300 bar steels are sort-of common in the UK and semi-rare over here. There's a couple of LDS around here that will do a 300bar fill. Never seen a 300bar composite outside of a hospital.
Interspiro Divatorlite (http://www.interspiro.com/product-divatorlite.htm) are supposed to be neutrally buoyant. Seem a bit delicate to me.

cummings66
09-15-2009, 22:31
Actually as I've posted a couple years back it seems, these have rather good buoyancy characteristics, not at all like some think.

But, as has been said, try to get a full fill on them. I can't get full fills most of the time on my 3500 psi cylinders, these would be a joke.

scubastud
09-15-2009, 22:52
"How much oxygen does it hold and how long can you stay underwater with it?"

:smiley2:

navyhmc
09-16-2009, 00:02
"How much oxygen does it hold and how long can you stay underwater with it?"

:smiley2:


Did you.....?

No....!


Wha.......?



You did NOT just say "How much OXYGEN does it hold"!.....?



If you say flippers, I swear........!!!!!:smiley36:

CompuDude
09-16-2009, 00:16
"How much oxygen does it hold and how long can you stay underwater with it?"

:smiley2:


Did you.....?

No....!


Wha.......?



You did NOT just say "How much OXYGEN does it hold"!.....?



If you say flippers, I swear........!!!!!:smiley36:

Next he's going to start talking about his goggles... :smilie39:

navyhmc
09-16-2009, 00:35
Don't encourage him CD!!!! :smilie39: Don't encourage him!!!!

scubastud
09-16-2009, 04:07
Oh cmon.. I put a little "winky" smiley afterwards..

navyhmc
09-16-2009, 05:54
You did what with your winky?????? :smiley36:


Oh, I didn't see the :smiley2: !!!!

cummings66
09-16-2009, 10:16
Jeeze, what some people don't know. Who's his instructor anyhow, somebody should get his name.:smiley36:

WD8CDH
09-16-2009, 16:30
Around here where most dive shops fill paintball tanks too, you can easily get 4500 psi fills on tanks that have that service pressure.

The tank mentioned has very similar but slightly better buoyancy characteristics than a AL80.

comet24
09-16-2009, 16:43
I just found it interesting as I had never seen a composite type tank using Aluminum and fiberglass. While I don't think I would ever buy one I like to see the innovation. New tank design can only help the industry. I don't like the idea of a hydro every three years. Wonder how much of that is regulations. The 15 year service life doesn't bother me as much. I mean if I am still diving the same tank in 15 years I will feel lucky. Heck if I'm still diving then I will feel lucky.

I could likely get a 4300 full at my shop if the banks where full or I left it there but for now I am happy with my steels.

acamato
09-17-2009, 13:36
The fiberglass/alum tank design has been around for a long time. About 10 years ago fiberglass overwrapped alum cylinders were common on SCBA's. Then the full composite cylinders came out and that put an end to the fiberglass/alum cylinders. The DOT dictates the 15yr service life and 3 year hydro. Luxfer and SCI are the two main manufacturers of the composite SCBA cylinders. Composite cylinders used to have a 3 year hydro, but that changed in 2001 to 5 years for certain Special Permits. Most breathing air compressors should be able to fill 4500 PSI. In the fire service 6000 psi is the storage bank pressure.

Here is a link to the DOT Special Permit:
http://www.phmsa.dot.gov/staticfiles/PHMSA/SPA_App/OfferDocuments/SP12479_2006111134.pdf