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Beefcake
09-21-2009, 12:08
Alright, I know "fad" diets aren't the best way to achieve true health, but I have been struggling with my weight a little bit for the last 8 years or so, so I am currently on one of the protein diets. My weight used to regulate itself pretty well when my lifestyle was more active (I used to be a ski instructor and play tournament softball), but a long-term relationship and raising her kids got in the way of my old activities and my six-pack stomach became a full case. I'm not orca-fat, but I had reached the point where my weight was affecting my energy levels, fitness, and overall sense of well-being. I'm 6'2" and started the diet weighing approx 265# two weeks ago. I started with the goal of getting below 240#, but I quickly adjusted that goal to 220# (if I'm going to do it, I might as well become a Beefcake once again).

I have done this program in the past, and I know that it works for me, but I also know the pitfalls. It was encouraging this morning to see the scale stop at 250#, but one of the effects of this diet is that it knocks off a bunch of water weight first, so I have really only lost about 8# so far (still not bad for 2 weeks). There will be more substantial weight loss over the next month to six-weeks, then there will be a serious plateau, but I have placed a scale next to my refridgerator to remind me of my goal.

The good part of this diet for me is that it is somewhat self-regulating. I don't have to count calories; I can eat all I want as long as I stay under a certain number of carbs per day and over a certain minimum amount of protein. The major change that I am making this time from my previous experience with this program is that I am eating leaner, lower-fat proteins and more fiber (dietary fiber can be reduced from the number of carbs eaten, so I can still eat some vegetables). According to research I've read and discussions with a few medical professionals, this should have the added benefit of actually lowering my cholesterol (amazing that I can eat steak and eggs and lower my cholesterol, but it appears to work - the reason that some doctors are against this diet is that most people either live on sausage and cheese or cheat with too many carbs and never train their bodies to metabolize the protein and fat properly).

Anyway, I'm not trying to convert anyone here; I just figured the more people I tell about my goal, the more likely I am to stick to it. If anyone else decides to look into this, I would strongly recommend reading the book "Protein Power" first. Also, pay attention to the information about required supplements... without taking Potassium supplements, this diet can literally kill you.

So long to the old me:smiley30:

kwigleydownunder
09-21-2009, 13:45
Oh man . . . I thought you were going to say that you were using "Weight Gain 4000."
But seriously, good luck with your diet. I had good results with the Atkins diet several years ago, and have not put back on any of the weight, although I'd still like to lose a few more. I think the protein diets get a bad wrap cause everyone assumes you're just gorging on bacon all day, but if you do it smart it is a good diet. In recent years I have become a vegetarian and have trouble getting enough protein period, so if I tried a protein diet now I'd probably lose plenty of weight . . . from sheer starvation.
Anyway, best of luck and keep us posted on your progress. This seems to be a theme here lately.

PTAaron
09-21-2009, 13:58
I tend to lean towards extremely high protein intake myself. Protein has an interesting trait of requiring a fairly large amount of energy to break down - so it actually helps ramp up the metabolism (think "meat sweats"). At one time I was actually eating more than 5000 calories a day with 500g of protein ... and while doing this (with an intense workout program) managed to lose nealy 2" off my waist while also gaining 8lbs! (my goal was to lose fat and gain muscle)

Beefcake
09-22-2009, 00:15
Oh man . . . I thought you were going to say that you were using "Weight Gain 4000."
I am. Well, GNC Whey Protein, but the jug looks the same. That's actually how I got my monniker; when I was on this diet the first time, my girlfriend's kids thought my protein drink looked like WG4000.

"You guys are just jealous 'cuz I'm gonna be on TV lookin' all buff and everything... Beefcake! Beefcake!"

Zenagirl
09-22-2009, 13:21
If you approach this as a "diet" and something temporary, the minute you go back to your regular way of eating, you'll gain everything back. I've done exactly that far too many times in the past, which is why now I look at low carb as my lifestyle....something I'll never stop doing.

I also don't follow any particular low carb diet plan and instead have simply eliminated sugar completely from my life, severely reduced the amount of processed foods I eat, and severely restrict flour, pasta, and rice. I mostly eat meats, eggs, cheese, veggies, nuts, and a limited amount of fruits (berries mostly) and keep my alcohol consumption to a minimum.

Since changing my lifestyle 6 months ago, I've lost 27 pounds (25 more to go!), my cholestrol has gone down nearly 200 pounds, with a big drop in Triglicerides as well. I have no plans to ever return to eating the "typical" American diet of sugar and flour!

Good luck with your journey, I hope you find success!

petronius
09-22-2009, 14:08
Wow, this thread has been a huge boon to my vocabulary - "orca-fat" and "meat sweats" are going into immediate rotation! :rofl:

I've had family members see great results from protein-heavy diets, especially when the foods are chosen carefully. I do think you should focus on long-term behavior changes; It's easy to have a 'successful' diet but a permanent change requires new food habits (and lots of diving)...

Good luck!

PTAaron
09-22-2009, 17:32
Worst meat sweats ever: started 3/4 through eating a 32oz sirloin - lasted for almost 2 hours!

Beefcake
09-23-2009, 00:52
Wow, this thread has been a huge boon to my vocabulary - "orca-fat" and "meat sweats" are going into immediate rotation! :rofl:
I can't take credit; I stole the phrase "Orca-fat" from Kevin Spacey in The Usual Suspects.

Beefcake
09-23-2009, 00:57
Zena- Good job! I agree about the lifestyle change. My big problem throughout my adult life hasn't been sugars / starches but rather massively fatty fast food. Through college an into my career, I was single and busy and didn't know how to cook, so the golden arches was easier than grocery shopping. Fast forward 20 years, and I'm surprised my heart can pump all the sludge that must be inside me. I'm ready to do this right.

Lulubelle
09-24-2009, 01:50
If you approach this as a "diet" and something temporary, the minute you go back to your regular way of eating, you'll gain everything back. I've done exactly that far too many times in the past, which is why now I look at low carb as my lifestyle....something I'll never stop doing.

I also don't follow any particular low carb diet plan and instead have simply eliminated sugar completely from my life, severely reduced the amount of processed foods I eat, and severely restrict flour, pasta, and rice. I mostly eat meats, eggs, cheese, veggies, nuts, and a limited amount of fruits (berries mostly) and keep my alcohol consumption to a minimum.

Since changing my lifestyle 6 months ago, I've lost 27 pounds (25 more to go!), my cholestrol has gone down nearly 200 pounds, with a big drop in Triglicerides as well. I have no plans to ever return to eating the "typical" American diet of sugar and flour!

Good luck with your journey, I hope you find success!

+ 1. First of all, good luck Beefcake and we want before and after pictures. Everyone's path to weight loss may be different, our bodies certainly are. But personally, I'm with Zena. I'm for lifestyle changes that you can commit to for life. Eat real food in moderate portions. By real food, I too mean nothing processed. Eat things that came out of the ground, off of the tree, out of the ocean, off of the ranch, etc. Caveman food. People sometimes don't realize that even white rice, bread, pasta, etc are "processed". And I'm a bit "granola" and buy organic when possible. The trick with carbs is to know which ones are complex and have a high glycemic index and which ones do not. The fruits vary widely in this regard.

Our bodies need all of the food groups, albeit in moderation, to be the most healthy.

scubarobin
09-30-2009, 11:55
If you approach this as a "diet" and something temporary, the minute you go back to your regular way of eating, you'll gain everything back. I've done exactly that far too many times in the past, which is why now I look at low carb as my lifestyle....something I'll never stop doing.

I also don't follow any particular low carb diet plan and instead have simply eliminated sugar completely from my life, severely reduced the amount of processed foods I eat, and severely restrict flour, pasta, and rice. I mostly eat meats, eggs, cheese, veggies, nuts, and a limited amount of fruits (berries mostly) and keep my alcohol consumption to a minimum.

Since changing my lifestyle 6 months ago, I've lost 27 pounds (25 more to go!), my cholestrol has gone down nearly 200 pounds, with a big drop in Triglicerides as well. I have no plans to ever return to eating the "typical" American diet of sugar and flour!

Good luck with your journey, I hope you find success!

good going girl!!! :smiley31:

Our food plans - my hubby tends to do that stupid low-carb diet about once a year, drops 25lbs and then gradually adds it right back on. Repeat cycle. :smiley11: It makes me crazy! Especially because this means I have to prepare 2 meals every meal - one for him and one for me and daughter!

The daughter and I tend to slack off on the meat thing, we like beans, fish, eggs, and nuts for protein (although we both love the occasional gyro or tandoori chicken, etc.). We do still have an issue with carbs - we love brown rice and wheat bread but we have cut way back on both. We would both rather do a vegetarian diet if we could get away with it. There are so many amazing foods (fruits, veggies, grains) out there and we love them!

I agree with you about the American diet of carbs and fats - yuck! We used to do that and weaned ourselves off, now we don't even like french fries as all we can taste is grease. Ron and I just spent a weekend in Vegas and it was impossible for me to eat vegetarian other than salads or eggplant parmesian (on every freakin' menu as their veg option!). Come on folks!

robin:smiley20:

Beefcake
10-02-2009, 14:27
248 this morning (broke the first plateau)!

PS. Lulu- Sorry, no before pics... Actually, I could post some way before - like before my hair loss! The rest of me looks good, but I'm a little touchy about my fivehead.

Lulubelle
10-02-2009, 14:41
248 this morning (broke the first plateau)!

PS. Lulu- Sorry, no before pics... Actually, I could post some way before - like before my hair loss! The rest of me looks good, but I'm a little touchy about my fivehead.

I've recently dropped about 8 pounds, but I would NOT recommend my strategy.

As for hair loss, men without hair have more testosterone than those without (given the same genetic predisposition), so consider that feature to be a positive advertisement!

Beefcake
10-02-2009, 21:29
I was kidding. I'm really not shy; I'm just too lazy to upload photos.

Beefcake
11-14-2009, 00:13
Alright, I fell of the wagon for about a month, but now I'm back on track and rollin' about 245#.

Beefcake
12-11-2009, 02:36
I haven't been very serious about this lately, but I did hit 240 at the beginning of the week. Hopefully I can keep the downward trend rolling. Beefcake! Beefcake!

Filippo
01-05-2010, 04:23
Keep up the good work!
I'm back on reduced carbs/high protein diet, though my goal is to GAIN weight :)

clavicl3
01-05-2010, 14:36
Sigh. I guess since it's the new year, it's time to get back to hitting the gym. No upcoming excuses to stop going.

krakilin
01-14-2010, 12:23
Check out a user on youtube called liferegenerator. I've been following his program of green juice and such and I feel great! You want amino acids not protein! :smiley20:

CaughtSteelin
03-10-2010, 21:48
So Beefcake-You still doing it???:smiley36:

neugierig
03-11-2010, 04:21
beefcake, you gotta tell me more about this low carb thing man.

i go low carb most of the time. and try to work out at least 3x a week. but my weight stays at around the same level. any details on your diet?

Noob
03-11-2010, 08:26
beefcake, you gotta tell me more about this low carb thing man.

i go low carb most of the time. and try to work out at least 3x a week. but my weight stays at around the same level. any details on your diet?


Drop the sugars. You will see alot of benefit. More energy, weight loss, better all around attitude. You will go through a couple weeks or maybe less of sugar withdraws though. I rarely have much sugar anymore and work out about 3 times a week. I feel better now then when I was in my 20's.

PTAaron
05-29-2010, 12:57
beefcake, you gotta tell me more about this low carb thing man.

i go low carb most of the time. and try to work out at least 3x a week. but my weight stays at around the same level. any details on your diet?
If you're not dropping weight and you are trying to then you need to do one of 2 things: decrease your calories, or increase your activity level.
A decrease of 250-300 calories a day below whatever you are currently taking in and adding 30 minutes of cardio a day will create a slight deficit and over the course of a week, 2 weeks, month you will see results. Decreasing by more will create faster results - but decreasing too fast will possibly cause your body to react by slowing your metabolism and making fat loss even harder.

bigman241
05-30-2010, 19:44
I started my deit with three days of protein drinks. one each meal for three days. Then went to eatting once or twice a day last monday. I lost 20 pounds in 10 days. Though my doctor told me to stay away from the protein drinks and go with ensure as the protein drinks and powders have high level of heavy metals and stuff that is unhealthy.

Straegen
05-31-2010, 06:56
A couple of big studies have shown dieters who go on low carb diets generally tend to fail sooner and gain more when they come off the diet than those who do it the old fashioned way.

Decreasing sugar levels is a big thumbs up from me.

Best thing a person can do IMO, is to eat less proportions and eat more times per day. At least five times and eat fresh food with no preservatives and as little salt as possible. A persons total caloric intake should be balanced probably somewhere around 50% carbs, 20% protein and 30% fat.

Other tips:


Cook all your own food. Cooking takes time and you will better know what you are putting in your mouth.
When you do slip (and most will), don't be hard on yourself. This isn't a race with the scale. Your goal should be more good days than bad ones. That isn't an excuse but forgive your own excesses.
fiber. Fiber. FIBER! Fiber is the regulator on your digestion. It makes your body work for those nutrients and allows your body to process foods better. Natural foods are often high in fiber compared to their processed counterparts .
Sauces on the side please. Salads are good for you until many are coated in fatty sugary crap. Gravy? Fat in a bowl.
Long grains either baked yourself or from the bakery. If you are buying your bread in the bread isle in pre made packages, stop and go to a bakery. If you hate wheat... learn to love it. Good wheat bread doesn't have to taste like butt and a good bakery will often have wheat better than the tasteless white from the bakery isle.
Nuts are great when you have to pull them out of the shell. That shell slows down the delivery of a food that is high in fat and fiber.
No more juice... all the sugar none of the fiber
Avoid the gym... unless you love it. Far better to find an activity that moves your body in all three planes, utilizes cardio and engages the brain. Consider a sport like tennis or basketball. They are more fun so you are more likely to want to do it. They engage muscles in a chain rather than isolating them. An executed movement in the body is only as strong as its weakest link. Isolation training for stronger "arms" in a machine at the gym will yield stronger muscles in the arm but it is unlikely to engage the other couple dozen muscles needed to say lift something heavy onto a shelf. Throwing/catching a medicine ball with a friend is a far more productive workout.


IMO of course.

bigman241
06-02-2010, 20:17
bing. Right now we are running around. Monday morning class, monday afternoon homeowork WORK, tuesday morning work, tueday afternoon class, wensday work maybe some homework, thursday work thursday afternoon classes. Friday WORK and more WORK sat sunday i spend in a coma recovering from 4 hours of sleep and 20 hour days 5 days a week.

TOday I hate left over italitn brats from yesterday's pizza. Both lunch and dinner though I skipped breakfest and swam a mile so guess it evened out.


Zena- Good job! I agree about the lifestyle change. My big problem throughout my adult life hasn't been sugars / starches but rather massively fatty fast food. Through college an into my career, I was single and busy and didn't know how to cook, so the golden arches was easier than grocery shopping. Fast forward 20 years, and I'm surprised my heart can pump all the sludge that must be inside me. I'm ready to do this right.

Straegen
06-02-2010, 22:10
TOday I hate left over italitn brats from yesterday's pizza. Both lunch and dinner though I skipped breakfest and swam a mile so guess it evened out. Pizza, Brats, skipped breakfast... the only thing that sounds health-wise OK in that is swimming 30 laps which is good, very good if you didn't use fins and awesome if you varied your stroke and ran timed laps.

PTAaron
06-03-2010, 08:14
I started my deit with three days of protein drinks. one each meal for three days. Then went to eatting once or twice a day last monday. I lost 20 pounds in 10 days. Though my doctor told me to stay away from the protein drinks and go with ensure as the protein drinks and powders have high level of heavy metals and stuff that is unhealthy.
I'd love to see where your doctor got that information.
Whey protein is a byproduct of manufacture of cheese and milk - I'm curious where the unhealthy stuff and heavy metals could come from.
Also - 20lbs in 10 days = not healthy and not likely to be a lasting change.

PTAaron
06-03-2010, 08:18
A couple of big studies have shown dieters who go on low carb diets generally tend to fail sooner and gain more when they come off the diet than those who do it the old fashioned way.

Decreasing sugar levels is a big thumbs up from me.

Best thing a person can do IMO, is to eat less proportions and eat more times per day. At least five times and eat fresh food with no preservatives and as little salt as possible. A persons total caloric intake should be balanced probably somewhere around 50% carbs, 20% protein and 30% fat.

Other tips:

Cook all your own food. Cooking takes time and you will better know what you are putting in your mouth.
When you do slip (and most will), don't be hard on yourself. This isn't a race with the scale. Your goal should be more good days than bad ones. That isn't an excuse but forgive your own excesses.
fiber. Fiber. FIBER! Fiber is the regulator on your digestion. It makes your body work for those nutrients and allows your body to process foods better. Natural foods are often high in fiber compared to their processed counterparts .
Sauces on the side please. Salads are good for you until many are coated in fatty sugary crap. Gravy? Fat in a bowl.
Long grains either baked yourself or from the bakery. If you are buying your bread in the bread isle in pre made packages, stop and go to a bakery. If you hate wheat... learn to love it. Good wheat bread doesn't have to taste like butt and a good bakery will often have wheat better than the tasteless white from the bakery isle.
Nuts are great when you have to pull them out of the shell. That shell slows down the delivery of a food that is high in fat and fiber.
No more juice... all the sugar none of the fiber
Avoid the gym... unless you love it. Far better to find an activity that moves your body in all three planes, utilizes cardio and engages the brain. Consider a sport like tennis or basketball. They are more fun so you are more likely to want to do it. They engage muscles in a chain rather than isolating them. An executed movement in the body is only as strong as its weakest link. Isolation training for stronger "arms" in a machine at the gym will yield stronger muscles in the arm but it is unlikely to engage the other couple dozen muscles needed to say lift something heavy onto a shelf. Throwing/catching a medicine ball with a friend is a far more productive workout.
IMO of course.
Great advice!

Only differences in what I recommend are higher percentage of protein vs carbs - I tend to reverse them and go 50% protein, 20% carbs. I also, being a bodybuilder, feel differently about the "avoid the gym" tip - but do agree that for your average person trying to lose weight it is very important to find an activity that you enjoy rather than forcing yourself to go to the gym... so that is an excellent point for the average person.

Straegen
06-03-2010, 09:41
Bumping up your proteins can really work if you know what you are doing (and it sounds like you do). You have to really up your water intake since protein rich diets can be harder on the kidneys and often high protein diets cut fiber which if not monitored can be counter productive.

I put the avoid the gym comment in there with the disclaimer about loving it. My wife works out 6 days a week with a trainer at the gym and LOVES it. If you love it, do it. However, most people don't know how to get good value out of a gym and grow to dislike going as it often becomes a job.

In the last couple years, I have become disillusioned with isolation training. I think the fitness world is on the edge of a revolution and that is seeing fitness as only one part of improving a persons health. Multi-plane movement engaging the brain for exercise, working out the mind followed through with quality food and stress reduction is the next "big thing". Movement with purpose if you will. I think trainers who move down this path today will be in higher demand in the next few years.

scubaman450
06-16-2010, 10:55
I do a protein drink I make in the AM it's two scoops of whey powder that is call Supper Advanced Whey Protein I get it a wal-mart for $16 last me about 10 days (lot cheeper then meat,fish,ect) I add one ege one banna and low fat powder milk. I have a complete multivitamin, omega 3 fish oil,MSM and glucosamine.
I left wieghts, Run, swim,bike and hike to stay in shape. At 52 I will never "look" like a poster boy....Being that I'm a Man, I don't wish to look like a boy.
We don't have to "look" like some kid of greek god to be fit. Fit is state of mind as well as a state of health. If we have a good outlook of ourselfs and can do the what we wish to do then we are already fit. the hardest part of being "fit" is being stright up with ourselfs about what we NEED to do not what we CAN do. Only you can make that call or if your under some one eleis call then you do as they call or get out.