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BubblesMcCoy
10-05-2009, 13:31
I've got a al80 that isn't painted but instead has the polished exterior. Most of my dives this season were freshwater and my tank is starting to tarnish a bit. It's not a huge deal, but I really liked the polished look of the tank when I got it new. Anyone have any idea on what kind of polish or cleaner might be helpful to restore it?

CompuDude
10-05-2009, 13:45
I've got a al80 that isn't painted but instead has the polished exterior. Most of my dives this season were freshwater and my tank is starting to tarnish a bit. It's not a huge deal, but I really liked the polished look of the tank when I got it new. Anyone have any idea on what kind of polish or cleaner might be helpful to restore it?

An aluminum tank isn't going to stay "shiny" without some sort of clearcoat, which frankly could cause future corrosion problems as they'll never stay perfectly sealed over time.

Any sort of aluminum polish should shine things up in the short term, but the problem isn't going to go away, it's just the nature of metals in water.

TurtleWax may actually be a decent option, but it'll need regular reapplication.

No Misses
10-05-2009, 13:58
That dull gray oxidation is what protects the AL. I prefer the dull gray look. That way I do not look like a large Rapala (sans trebel hooks)swimming through the water.

awap
10-05-2009, 14:10
Take it out and roll it around in you driveway. I will grip the cam bands better.

BubblesMcCoy
10-05-2009, 21:44
I've got a al80 that isn't painted but instead has the polished exterior. Most of my dives this season were freshwater and my tank is starting to tarnish a bit. It's not a huge deal, but I really liked the polished look of the tank when I got it new. Anyone have any idea on what kind of polish or cleaner might be helpful to restore it?

An aluminum tank isn't going to stay "shiny" without some sort of clearcoat, which frankly could cause future corrosion problems as they'll never stay perfectly sealed over time.

Any sort of aluminum polish should shine things up in the short term, but the problem isn't going to go away, it's just the nature of metals in water.

TurtleWax may actually be a decent option, but it'll need regular reapplication.


TurtleWax sounds like a good place to start. I really don't care if it's a permanent change, it would just be nice to shine it up a bit and have it ready for next season.

CWSWine
10-06-2009, 08:31
If you want something that will last a while stop by your local Ace Hardware store and look in the Auto department for a product called “Rejex”. It was developed for the Air Force to keep exhaust residue from sticking to the jet aircraft. This stuff will last 6 to 12 months on your car and one of the more durable car products on the market. Also a great product for you car and makes clean up on wheels from brake dust a snap. Turtle wax is good for about 6 weeks to 3 months at the most.

CompuDude
10-06-2009, 13:01
If you want something that will last a while stop by your local Ace Hardware store and look in the Auto department for a product called “Rejex”. It was developed for the Air Force to keep exhaust residue from sticking to the jet aircraft. This stuff will last 6 to 12 months on your car and one of the more durable car products on the market. Also a great product for you car and makes clean up on wheels from brake dust a snap. Turtle wax is good for about 6 weeks to 3 months at the most.

But is it safe for the fishies, or is a simpler wax product a more environmentally-friendly option?